Unmounting Hard drive
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Thread: Unmounting Hard drive

  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    Unmounting Hard drive

    What exactly would happen if I were to unmount my hard-drive while using Linux? Would I be able to re-mount it? Would the boot sector still work (I'd imagine so.) Would just my personal files be lost, and the core of Linux be remaining?

    Don't want to test it out without having some idea of what'll happen...I don't want to have to do a Rescue or a Re-install..

    Thanks guys. :-)
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  2. #2
    Elite Hacker
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    Don't quote me on this but it should only be unmounted for that session. Once you reboot or something it should remount, unless you change some configurations. I don't think you can do anything if you unmount your hard drive. I'm pretty sure you would just have to reboot.

    edit
    What exactly would happen if I were to unmount my hard-drive while using Linux? Would I be able to re-mount it? Would the boot sector still work (I'd imagine so.) Would just my personal files be lost, and the core of Linux be remaining?

    Don't want to test it out without having some idea of what'll happen...I don't want to have to do a Rescue or a Re-install..

    Thanks guys. :-)
    Just wanted to add something. Why would you want to do this?

  3. #3
    Senior Member
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    Ok. Input from anyone else? :oesn't feel like try it from one piece of advice...that starts with "Don't quote me."::
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  4. #4
    Senior Member Maestr0's Avatar
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    Mounting the drive merely makes a partition available to the operating system after the file system has been determined. Unless you re-partition the drive your data is fine. In linux a CD or tape or harddrive (and pretty much everything else) is all the same, its a device and it just has to be mounted to be used by the OS. There are alot of historical reasons for this system, I'm sure google would reveal much.

    -Maestr0
    \"If computers are to become smart enough to design their own successors, initiating a process that will lead to God-like omniscience after a number of ever swifter passages from one generation of computers to the next, someone is going to have to write the software that gets the process going, and humans have given absolutely no evidence of being able to write such software.\" -Jaron Lanier

  5. #5
    Trumpet-Eared Gentoo Freak
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    My guess is your session or will stall if you succeed, or it will say the device is busy,
    As long os your harddrive or partitions are in /etc/fstab your box will remount it on boot.

    My question too : Why do you wanna do that ?
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  6. #6
    rebmeM roineS enilnOitnA steve.milner's Avatar
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    umount /
    umount / device is busy

    Is what happens.

    One way to handle the device is busy problem is to use umount -l which waits until the device is free and then unmounts it, but that will be when you shutdown in this case.

    Steve
    IT, e-commerce, Retail, Programme & Project Management, EPoS, Supply Chain and Logistic Services. Yorkshire. http://www.bigi.uk.com

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