False Domain Info May Mean Jail
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Thread: False Domain Info May Mean Jail

  1. #1
    Senior Member DeadAddict's Avatar
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    False Domain Info May Mean Jail

    Congress may crack down on businesses and people who provide false information when they register a website, proposing huge fines and extra jail time for those who violate copyright and trademark law.

    To read more about it
    http://www.wired.com/news/politics/0...w=wn_tophead_1

  2. #2
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    That is at least stupid....can the congress go after also people who r not american citizens? I just read the article... may be one will say that the motives are good but i think it is just another way to limit freedom..anyway
    Is that the place where I am supposed to say sth clever and brilliant so that everybody understands how clever nice guy I am????
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    I'm wondering how exactly would they define false information. Would you get the ax for mis-spelling a name or location, also, if your information changes, and you don't update it, would that also constitue false information?


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  4. #4
    Senior Member DeadAddict's Avatar
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    I believe it applies to when the person is first registering for the domain name. On one hand I think it is a pretty good idea that they are doing this, because I hope it will make people think twice about setting up Phisher web sites to con information such as credit card numbers Etc from people. But on the other hand anyone with the knowledge and tools can find out the personal information and use it for malicious purposes if it is put there.

  5. #5
    AO übergeek phishphreek's Avatar
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    Backers say the bill, known as the Fraudulent Online Identity Sanctions Act, targets only those who lie when submitting data to domain-registration databases and then go on to break federal laws.
    It looks like the only people targeted will be those who are looking to defraud people and those who setup "phishing" sites.

    I don't see any way they can target fraudulent sites in other countries, unless they have some aggreement with those countries.

    What if a user in the US sets up a site with fraudulent user info using a web host of another country?

    If I'm in another country, then I have to follow their rules.
    If I go to mexico and I'm 18, I can drink. I'm now following their laws... Where I have to be 21 in the US. (at least the state I live in)

    If I'm hosting a site in another country, then I have to follow their laws?

    Or, would it still be unlawful because the communication starts in the US?

    Or, what if I was to use a shell account on a box that is in another country to register my info?
    Then I upload my content from a shell account in another country, and the info was never physically stored on my machine in the US?

    Communication still starts in the US?
    Quitmzilla is a firefox extension that gives you stats on how long you have quit smoking, how much money you\'ve saved, how much you haven\'t smoked and recent milestones. Very helpful for people who quit smoking and used to smoke at their computers... Helps out with the urges.

  6. #6
    Senior Member nihil's Avatar
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    I think this is "secondary offences" legislation?

    You will have to have commited some other offence, and they just add this one to the list? It is pretty easy to prove, so strengthens the primary case, and gives the judge more sentencing power and the DA more bargaining chips?

    It also makes the politicians seem to "be doing something about it".

    I would guess that only inept criminals need to be concerned

    Cheers

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    Originally posted here by nihil
    I think this is "secondary offences" legislation?

    You will have to have commited some other offence, and they just add this one to the list? It is pretty easy to prove, so strengthens the primary case, and gives the judge more sentencing power and the DA more bargaining chips?

    It also makes the politicians seem to "be doing something about it".

    I would guess that only inept criminals need to be concerned
    Yes, I seriously doubt that there is the funding available to check everyone's information... just one more thing to be thrown at you if you've misbehaved. Kind of like the laws adding a separate charge for failure to pay tax on their marijuana for people who are charged as marijuana growers.

  8. #8
    Speaking of Firewalls I was thinking of making a diskless firewall with a junky old box it has 256MB of ram and I am going to use NetBSD, If I administer it right do you guys think it will be just as if not more secure than most CISCO, NetGEAR, DLink, and lynksys Firewalls that are built into there routers?

  9. #9
    Whoops anyways
    Does congress have a say on peoples profiles on the internet?.......
    I have these domain names do you think they are going to come after me?
    shellacct.com, org, net
    aorp.net
    agarb.com
    vb.mdns.org

  10. #10
    AO übergeek phishphreek's Avatar
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    [offtopic]
    VBraga: when you post and you wanted to add more, simply press the "edit" button on your post. that will allow you to modify what you've posted without posting several times.
    [/offtopic]

    if you build your own firewall, there is no reason that it shouldn't be as secure as a hardware solution (cisco, netgear, linksys, etc) most of the home routers just offer NAT with some port forwarding. If you build your own, you can go way further than that. you can tell it who and what to block.

    personally, I use a cisco 806 broadband router, which allows me to create ACLs (send the logs to a log server) so I can do my port forwarding, firewall rules and etc.

    I've recently played with smoothwall and I like that too. It has better features than my current router, but I have to tweak a lot of the .conf files and scripts manually rather than using the web interface. I require more functionality than the interface gives me.
    Quitmzilla is a firefox extension that gives you stats on how long you have quit smoking, how much money you\'ve saved, how much you haven\'t smoked and recent milestones. Very helpful for people who quit smoking and used to smoke at their computers... Helps out with the urges.

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