what is a bigger problem?viruses or spyware?

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Thread: what is a bigger problem?viruses or spyware?

  1. #1
    Banned
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    what is a bigger problem?viruses or spyware?

    Hi.
    I just came across a forum where someone claimed that spyware is a far bigger problem than viruses.This is what he says:
    I find spyware is more of a problem than virii nowadays. The only virus I ever had was back before the Internet was popular, it killed my doublespace file and hence required a reformat of the HD... that was back when HD sizes were smaller than the average amount of memory now :-)
    That makes me wonder which is really a bigger problem?Spyware,or viruses?

  2. #2
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    I think the biggest problem is the end user. If more people would use a little common sense, many of the problems could at least be held to a minimum.

  3. #3
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    I agree with devpon, nowadays computer noobs have irresisting urge to open every file attachment he gets through email, even from people they dont even know, I dont know why, but its true lol. So if your a computer noob, then I'd say virri are by far more of a problem, but for people who know what happens when you download unknown file attachments I would have to say spyware is the bigger problem. So your question is pretty much answered, it all depends on what kind of computer user you are lol.
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  4. #4
    AO übergeek phishphreek's Avatar
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    Originally posted here by devpon
    I think the biggest problem is the end user. If more people would use a little common sense, many of the problems could at least be held to a minimum.
    I second that.

    However, I was reading an article the other day that makes me think that spyware may be a bigger problem. IMO- Most people have been bitten by a virus and learned from their mistake of not having antivirus.

    Spyware is just annoying... and people don't really know about them as much as they do viruses.

    The average computer is crammed with nearly 28 pieces of spyware, according to a report released this week by Atlanta-based ISP EarthLink andWebRoot Software, a message privacy and protection provider.

    Over the three-month period from 1 January 2004 to 31 March, EarthLink's and WebRoot's spyware and adware detection software sniffed through over a million systems and found more than 29 million instances of spyware.
    http://www.itnews.com.au/storyconten...9&Art_ID=19182

    I've taken home people's PCs (people from work's home computers) and found that most of the time... there is more spyware than anything. They haven't a clue what it is. But, in most cases... these people had updated antivirus. I do send out emails stressing the importance of antivirus and warnings of new viruses and the like. I don't do the same for spyware...
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  5. #5
    Newbies have what I call the 'click' syndrome. They love to just click click click on everything. I have worked on 10 computers in the past week, and all contained spyware and adware. There are several "free" programs available to help remove and prevent the installation of these threats. Some examples are: Spybot, Ad-aware, SpywareGuard, SpywareBlaster, Keylogger Hunter. But the most impressive program of all time bar none, and is free: COMMON SENSE.

    If security is a huge issue as it is with myself, you may follow my choices, as I have Never had a threat make it onto my box: Two Linksys routers (different models), ZoneAlarm Pro, Norton 2004, Sygate free, and all the above free anti-spyware and anti-adware programs. I update them everyday, run them everyday, and use common sense.

  6. #6
    Super Moderator: GMT Zone nihil's Avatar
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    I would say that spyware/adware is more likely to be a problem to private and home office users, particularly ones who are not clued up.

    Viruses/worms are the greater problem to business/corporate users as they can be very disruptive and cost them serious money.

    Remember that Corporations frequently have properly configured firewalls and block a lot of spam and non-business web access, and do not allow viewing of private e-mail accounts. This tends to reduce the exposure to spyware/adware.

    On the other hand, they have a lot of machines, are bound to have their quota of id10ts, and tend to have their machines on longer than the average home user. They also run networks which allows network aware stuff to spread rapidly.

    Just a slightly different slant?

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  7. #7
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    Grim_reaper1, lol I like that term you used..."click syndrome" haha, Im going to start using that one. Good analysis on the subject Nihil, I forgot all about the business/corpoprate world!! They definitly have it bad with virri.
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  8. #8
    I must ad two things to my previous statement.
    1). Simply installing any of the above programs will not do. They must be configured properly.
    2). I agree with nihil in that each domain(home/corporate) has it's own advantages and disadvantages. Home users are more at risk for spyware and adware. Businesses are more at risk from DoS attacks through email exploits and viruses, and are breeding grounds for DDoS attacks as well.

  9. #9
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    Ask yourself this simple question....what will shut down your computer, destroy data & keep you off line in some cases?
    But really, the original question is quite vague in it's current state.

  10. #10
    AO übergeek phishphreek's Avatar
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    Originally posted here by !mitationRust
    Ask yourself this simple question....what will shut down your computer, destroy data & keep you off line in some cases?
    But really, the original question is quite vague in it's current state.
    I see your point.. but:

    I've seen spyware keep a computer offline. In some cases I'd clasify spyware as a virus.
    I've had to completely reload systems that were FULL of spyware/adware.

    Viruses shouldn't be a huge problem for corp systems. I haven't had a virus infection on my work network in over 2.5 years. The layered defense that I use works quite well. Scan all incoming mail, and norton corp. av on each of my clients updated daily... sometimes more than once a day.

    I don't have a catch all for spyware/adware...

    Speaking of which... are there corporate solutions for spyware/adware?
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