Multiple (Hardware) Firewalls
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Thread: Multiple (Hardware) Firewalls

  1. #1
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    Multiple (Hardware) Firewalls

    What kind of conflicts would rise if you had your network come into a firewall/router and split to 2 systems and another firewall/router that split to an additional systems?

    Why?

    1.) Because I need another router for this section of the house.
    2.) Because if the secondary network would be more secure, it would work out as a plus since the second router would be installed inside my office.
    3.) If there would be issues, then I would go with a basic switch.

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    Multiple (Hardware) Firewalls

    What kind of conflicts would rise if you had your network come into a firewall/router and split to 2 systems and another firewall/router that split to an additional systems?

    Why?

    1.) Because I need another router for this section of the house.
    2.) Because if the secondary network would be more secure, it would work out as a plus since the second router would be installed inside my office.
    3.) If there would be issues, then I would go with a basic switch.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Spyrus's Avatar
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    As Long as you setup the Ips on the routers properly maybe having a 192 and a 172 or 10. addresses or disable dhcp and use static ips for the network, then the only real things I can think of would be as long as NAT doesnt do something obscurely weird you should be ok. It kind of seems like you will be doing a lot of redundant work though, opening the same ports on both routers. I might almost just run a switch off of it and add a software firewall in your office. just my thoughts though
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  4. #4
    Senior Member Spyrus's Avatar
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    As Long as you setup the Ips on the routers properly maybe having a 192 and a 172 or 10. addresses or disable dhcp and use static ips for the network, then the only real things I can think of would be as long as NAT doesnt do something obscurely weird you should be ok. It kind of seems like you will be doing a lot of redundant work though, opening the same ports on both routers. I might almost just run a switch off of it and add a software firewall in your office. just my thoughts though
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  5. #5
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    a switch would be easier to set up. the only real reason to set up another router and firewall is if you planned to make one of the subnets more of a demilitarized zone. there are serveral reasons you'd want to do this, you can google dmz's to see if one applies to you.
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    a switch would be easier to set up. the only real reason to set up another router and firewall is if you planned to make one of the subnets more of a demilitarized zone. there are serveral reasons you'd want to do this, you can google dmz's to see if one applies to you.
    U suk at teh intuhnet1!!1!1one

  7. #7
    AO Ancient: Team Leader
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    You shouldn't have any issue and no conflicts as long as the "internal internal" network is completely separate from the "internal".

    The master router will provide a 192.168.1.x address to the internal router, you could make the internal router's IP fixed if you want. Both routers can provide IP's in the same subnet and the addresses can even be the same because the two networks will be isolated by the routers. Port forwarding is also possible.

    This is the kind of setup I would recommend if you have a wireless router. The wireless is the master router and any computers in that network would be considered in the DMZ. Then the second router protects your computers from the wireless network.
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  8. #8
    AO Ancient: Team Leader
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    You shouldn't have any issue and no conflicts as long as the "internal internal" network is completely separate from the "internal".

    The master router will provide a 192.168.1.x address to the internal router, you could make the internal router's IP fixed if you want. Both routers can provide IP's in the same subnet and the addresses can even be the same because the two networks will be isolated by the routers. Port forwarding is also possible.

    This is the kind of setup I would recommend if you have a wireless router. The wireless is the master router and any computers in that network would be considered in the DMZ. Then the second router protects your computers from the wireless network.
    Don\'t SYN us.... We\'ll SYN you.....
    \"A nation that draws too broad a difference between its scholars and its warriors will have its thinking done by cowards, and its fighting done by fools.\" - Thucydides

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    As a matter of fact, the router/firewall I am currently using is a US Robotics Wireless. I can honestly say the secondary router (firewall or not) will not be wireless. I just think since the prices are so close to get another router w/ firewall is more realistic.

    What about this situation:

    I have a friend who has a network of five computers in his basement and networked off to one system in the living room, his bedroom, and his roommates room. Since his network comes into a router/firewall and then to a switch to be split thoughout the house. If his roommate wanted to secure his system from the rest or split the connection to more than one computer would they be able to use a firewall/router in the room without any conflict on the primary network?

  10. #10
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    As a matter of fact, the router/firewall I am currently using is a US Robotics Wireless. I can honestly say the secondary router (firewall or not) will not be wireless. I just think since the prices are so close to get another router w/ firewall is more realistic.

    What about this situation:

    I have a friend who has a network of five computers in his basement and networked off to one system in the living room, his bedroom, and his roommates room. Since his network comes into a router/firewall and then to a switch to be split thoughout the house. If his roommate wanted to secure his system from the rest or split the connection to more than one computer would they be able to use a firewall/router in the room without any conflict on the primary network?

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