couple of questions about wireless
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Thread: couple of questions about wireless

  1. #1

    couple of questions about wireless

    hi all,

    I've just (yesterday) bought a wireless router (ASUS WL-500G) and it's my first

    now i was configuring it to make it secure: got 3 options for encryption
    1. 64-bit WEP
    2. 128-bit WEP
    3. WPA-PK?

    now for my questions:

    what is WPA, is it more secure then 128-bit WEP? and is it compatible with most wireless cards?

    I've used the 128-bit WEP for now and got a 26 character network key.
    Is it possible to save the key on my network configuration on my notebook (running XP pro) so that i don't have to type it in ( or copy and paste it) every time i want to make a connection?

    another solution i thought about is connecting via the command line, so that i can write a script, which i have to run to make a connection, is this possible?

    I'm pretty new to wireless, the only experience i have with it is testing wireless connections from the customers at work ( i work in a repair center). So maybe these are obvious questions, but not to me...

    i've done research myself and i keep reading this section ( wireless security) on this forum to learn something from it, but these are questions i still don't know how to answer...


    thanks in advance for the replies

  2. #2
    Senior Member Spyrus's Avatar
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    Before anything make sure the default routers login name and password are changed to a strong password!!

    Now I will start with a definition for you before anything else

    WPA's encryption method is the Temporal Key Integrity Protocol (TKIP). TKIP adddresses the weaknesses of WEP by including a per-packet mixing function, a message integrity check, an extended initialization vector, and a re-keying mechanism. WPA provides "strong" user authentication based on 802.1X and the Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP). WPA depends on a central authentication server such as RADIUS to authenticate each user.
    --full source here

    It is slowly being added to everything and you should look for it to be the norm in the near future, especially in the corp world. As far as you using WEP if you install the software that came with your card it should have an option to save the information.

    I would also lock down your router using MAC filtering as well.
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  3. #3
    Before anything make sure the default routers login name and password are changed to a strong password!!
    already did that, but it's too bad that you can only change the password, i would like to change the usernam (admin account) as well.... perhaps if i can get a hold on the source code from the firmware...

    I would also lock down your router using MAC filtering as well.
    forgot to mention it, but i already did that too..

    if you install the software that came with your card it should have an option to save the information.
    if that is the case with this software, then i haven't found it yet, but as far as i saw there were only a couple of options:
    discovery and configuration of the router;
    uninstall the software;
    and some other thing, but that hasn't got the option to save anything, that's for sure...

    as for the WPA, this means i'll have to set up a radius server, i think this is possible within the router, but i'll have to check the manual to be sure..

    but i still don't understand completely how this works, will my WLAN networkcard in my notebook be compatible? it is a 802.11b network card from Intel.. ( My notebook is a Acer TM 291LCi)

  4. #4
    Master-Jedi-Pimps0r & Moderator thehorse13's Avatar
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    You wont find your WAP running a RADIUS server. You'll find a configuration area where you will setup the shared secret between the RADIUS server along with various protocol settings such as CHAP, etc. You're gonna need a separate box (typically a stand-alone but that's not a requirement on a home network).

    RADIUS can be setup on a variety of platforms for free. Win2K has RADIUS support and of course you could use open RADIUS on *nix.

    Your WEP key should be saved in your config. If you are unable to save it, you're doing something wrong.

    Command line scripting in order to connect to a WAP is a recipe for trouble. Try to figure out why your WEP key isn't being saved in your GUI config. Typically, you can create profiles within the card management software that comes with the wireless NIC. Take a closer look.
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  5. #5
    Macht Nicht Aus moxnix's Avatar
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    Typically, you can create profiles within the card management software that comes with the wireless NIC.
    My wireless card hold numerous profiles. I use 3 different wireless networks, one of which that uses wep and I don't have a bit of a problem switching from one to anouther. The only time I have to actually do anything is if I am in an area where I am not authorised on some network. Then I have to manually select it and add the encryption key if I wish to join it.
    \"Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, Champagne in one hand - strawberries in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming WOO HOO - What a Ride!\"
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  6. #6
    Senior Member Spyrus's Avatar
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    [QUOTE] Originally posted here by lepricaun
    [B]already did that, but it's too bad that you can only change the password, i would like to change the usernam (admin account) as well.... perhaps if i can get a hold on the source code from the firmware...

    You may want to try to update the firmware then you should be able to change the login name as well, at least I know you can do that with the linksys routers
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  7. #7
    You may want to try to update the firmware then you should be able to change the login name as well, at least I know you can do that with the linksys routers
    i've got the newest stable version, there is one newer, but it is still betatesting...

    as for the network key, i've found the solution in windows (xp) but not in the software provided with the router, this can't do anything except make a connection to the router on port 80...

    as for the RADIUS server... perhaps i'll set it up one time, for now i believe 128-bit and mac-access should be enough for me, i live at a ranch about 150m from the road, so i doubt that anyone else will have the chance to use my network, at least i hope

  8. #8
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    Hi,
    We really dont need to bother much for home use related to Wireless security.
    As i understand, a gud SSID and 128 bit WEP key with TKIP ( also WPA) and MAC filtering should be sufficient.

    If really worried then there are solutions incorporating RADIUS authentications with RSAs as well costins thousands of $ , but honestly the bugger is acutally our own mind , its only fear.. nothing much.. so dont worry enjoy ur wireless connectivity .

    That said, if someone for any reason, does not wants you to run wireless , he / she will simply bring another wireless gadget ( likely an old wireless phone ) and will simply jam the signal.. but usually people dont bug to that extent.. more over home wireless products are already so cheap why would u or any one bug u with that... live and let live .. :-)

    Lasty , there are sniffers , even if ur secure they will sniff.. so just realx.. use WEP / WPA and stay happy.


    Regards,
    Raja

  9. #9
    it's not that i'm afraid someone would use my network, it's just that i want to be able to secure it as much as possible since i'm learning for network administrator and i'm pretty sure i will get to deal wireless security sometime in the future for my future job... that's the main reason...

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