user and share level security
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Thread: user and share level security

  1. #1
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    user and share level security

    Is user level security more secure or the share level? What is the real difference?

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    Aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at an Elingsh uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht frist and lsat ltteer is at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae we do not raed ervey lteter by itslef but the wrod as a wlohe
    Keeping that in mind...
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  3. #3
    T3h Ch3F
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    Hmmmmmmmmmm....

    Anyone logged in including Admin. is a user, and share is part of being a user, unless of course you are logged in as guest, that would normally greatly limit the amount of "elbow room".

    Still a little confused by the question, can you give a little more detail regarding the situation?





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  4. #4
    Master-Jedi-Pimps0r & Moderator thehorse13's Avatar
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    I think I may know what the question is all about...

    Share level access is typically associated with the old Win9x "security" model. You had three choices: Read Only, Full, Depends on Password. This model, as you can see, is very limited. Also, these older OSes did not cater to users (as we know it today) because they were not designed to be true multiuser environments.

    When the magic of NTFS came along, user level access was given seven basic options out of the gate. They are: Full Control, Modify, Read & Execute, Read, Write and Special Permissions (which are even more granular). With all of this flexibility, you have *much* better control over exactly who does what on your system. The NTFS permissions are slightly different on NT4 as opposed to W2K and XP but they are close enough that you would be able to understand what each option does.

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  5. #5
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    Share level and user level are 2 diferente instances of security on Windows Network.
    Share level security only applies to user than are logged on other computer and is acessing this folder thru network
    User level security applies in any case (accessing thru network or logged on locally)
    When u are logged on locally, share security has no effect.
    WHen u access files thru network, both security schemas apply. U will have the least privilege access of both.
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  6. #6
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    Thanks the horse...that was what i needed... so share level goes to win9X and user level goes to win2k ans XP.

  7. #7
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    please be aware that share security is still present on NT and above and still need setup when sharing folders thru the network.
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  8. #8
    AO Guinness Monster MURACU's Avatar
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    rajunpl
    Share level security is independant of the version of the OS(windows). As cacosapo states it depends on the method you use to acces your folders. if you connect locally you only have to worry about NTFS or fat security. If you connect to the folder by the network you have to take into account both NTFS and sharelevel security settings.
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  9. #9
    Also, share levels apply to certain folders and drives. For example, you can share a folder on your computer on your local network, or even share your whole hard drive if you're that nuts. User permissions are a little different. Permissions for a user concern everything the user does on the computer, so it's scope is far beyond a specific folder or drive.

    Hoping that's somwhere in the ballpark of what you're asking about...

  10. #10
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    rajunpl,

    thehorse13 is on the right track. I imagine you are using Windows 9x (95, 98, or Me) and are looking in the Networking Properties section. I forget which tab name, but it's the far right-hand tab that lets you choose what type of share access you are going to use: share-level access and user-level access.

    Share-level access is what you want to choose. As thehorse13 correctly stated:
    You had three choices: Read Only, Full, Depends on Password. This model, as you can see, is very limited.
    User-level access is Microsoft's frail attempt to allow Windows 9xto utilize domain accounts for permissions. If a domain was established, you can choose User-level access and direct it to the Primary Domain Controller. Then, when you create a share, you can associate permissions on that share with a domain account or security group (BTW...it was really flakey when used with Active Directory). But remember, this security is only associated with someone connecting to a share you have created on the computer, not any type of actual file-level permission such as NTFS.

    Bottom line Share-level access is cheap, generic Windows 9.x security. User-level access is used in conjunction with a domain.

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