closing ports
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Thread: closing ports

  1. #1

    closing ports

    How do you close a open port?

  2. #2

    opening ports

    How can i open a closed port.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
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    try honeyd or maybe toss a service up (if you wanna open port 80 load up apache or IIS)

    www.honeyd.org
    www.apache.org
    ~THEJRC~
    I\'ll preach my pessimism right out loud to anyone that listens!
    I\'m not afraid to be alive.... I\'m afraid to be alone.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    heh, edit your /etc/inetd, uninstall unnecessary services, use access control lists at your router, firewall your connection

    least those be the quickest and easiest ways....
    ~THEJRC~
    I\'ll preach my pessimism right out loud to anyone that listens!
    I\'m not afraid to be alive.... I\'m afraid to be alone.

  5. #5
    Why though?

  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    he he (this has got to be a terrible joke, but while I sit here and drink my beer... I'll bite)

    The TCP/IP suite of networking protocols is not only divided up into several sub-protocols (udp, tcp, icmp, etc) but most sub-protocols use addressing and port schemes to differentiate traffic (for services, etc). You can check IANA for a listing of registerd tcp/ip ports http://www.iana.org/assignments/port-numbers

    in the short scheme of things, every thing we access online is essentially a service, when you open your web browser and type www.google.com into your address bar your computer does a number of things, it first needs to find out what the actual IP address of www.google.com is to do this it uses a service called DNS (domain name service) DNS operates at UDP port 53, your machine will send a request from what we call a random high number port (a port above number 1024) and send that request to a dns server with a destination port of UDP 53 (for dns of course) the request simply asks "whats the IP address of www.google.com??" the dns server will reply with the appropriate IP and your computer will use that number for it's communications with www.google.com.

    Anyeverwhoooo.... your happy machine then sends out a nifty request (from yet another high number port) to port 80 of www.google.com (via the IP addy of course) asking for the web page info you originally requested from your browser... happens pretty fast considering doesnt it??....

    quick reference bits -- TCP port numbers range from 0-65535 with registered services being on the "low numbered" ports, between 0 and 1024. without delving much deeper tcp itself is a transport protocol which allows other more specialized subsets of TCP/IP to communicate, your web browser most often uses the hypertext transfer protocol or HTTP to pull up web pages most commonly on TCP port 80, mail sending is typicaly the simple mail transfer protocol(SMTP) most commonly on TCP 25, mail receiving is typically the post office protocol (POP) on tcp 110, and so on.... like I said check IANA, read some RFC's, and maybe look into boning up on some good networking books at http://safari.oreilly.com

    by stopping services we no longer answer requests on the services port, thus (most often anyhow) rendering the port closed, firewalls simply block traffic to and from ports and addresses based on policies, access control lists at your router or switch will also block or limit traffic in a similar way (commonly refferred to as choking verses firewalling as firewalls typically add functionality such as stateful packet inspection and the like)
    ~THEJRC~
    I\'ll preach my pessimism right out loud to anyone that listens!
    I\'m not afraid to be alive.... I\'m afraid to be alone.

  7. #7
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
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    27
    good Job THEJRC
    But lets say i have port 139 or 445 open in my pc , and i have win XP pro , how can i close them without using firewall ?

  8. #8
    Senior Member
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    Mar 2003
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    Turn off NetBios/NetBUI. Those aren't used for anything except file/printer sharing and NT domain stuff (none of which needs to be getting out on the internet) anyway.

    -- spurious
    Get OpenSolaris http://www.opensolaris.org/

  9. #9
    Senior Member
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    hackophreak56

    Your other thread was: How do you close a open port?

    Closing Ports
    http://www.antionline.com/showthread...hreadid=258958

    I'm not one that teaches quantum physics here, but I did read the other posts. And to my recollection there was plenty of information passed on to you about closing ports. If you reverse the process provided..... Don't be shy about using the search engine on AO's Main Page.

    Ports generally relate to a service of some sort. Securing the service closes the port, Employing the service opens the port. By your signature it appears that you prefer Linux. Depending on which distro you use, there may be configuration tools to accomplish what you are asking. In SuSE, Yast is one such example. Otherwise -

    edit your /etc/inetd, you can reinstall the services there, or if you commented them out just remove the comment out.

    If you don't know what we are talking about, then do yourself a favor and learn your OS inside and out, front to back. There are gbs of manuals, threads, etc., written on Linux and just about every aspect of it.

    cheers

    Edit: guess I just missed the troll sighting...
    Connection refused, try again later.

  10. #10
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    5
    the softwares are responsible for opening or closing of the ports.until and unless u don't know the software responsible for the opened port you can't close it. u can close ports by uninstalling the softwares which open the ports.

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