Getting Panther to log into Active Directory
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Thread: Getting Panther to log into Active Directory

  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    Jan 2003
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    Getting Panther to log into Active Directory

    Ok, so my wife got herself a powerbook last Friday.

    She got it for work, and where she works runs Win2k and an Active Directory. At least, that's what I gather from looking at the client of her old Wintel laptop.

    Anyway, she' naturally very, very concerned that it's not going to log in to her network at work, thereby subjecting her to ridicule and finger pointing by the guys she works with. So, in an effort to make her feel better, I took down one of my SuSE boxes this weekend, loaded Win2k on it, and installed AD. <-- I can't even begin to describe how dirty I felt doing that.

    As soon as I created a user for her, she was able to see the server and the shares that I gave her permissions to by simply clicking network -> servers -> server name then entering her user name and password and selecting a mount point . At least....it was something like that, I'm not a mac guy so I don't remember exactly.

    So with fears lain somewhat aside, she goes to work this morning sure that she'll be able to see her business network. Guess what? Panic stricken calls by 9:00 a.m. that when she clicks on servers, all she sees is her local hard drive.

    I don't know what to tell her, I'm a WAN engineer for crying out loud.

    So, though this is only dubiously security related, I'm hoping that someone can shed some light on what she needs to do to actually log into her network. I mean....windows is actually keeping someone out for once.

    Oh, and her boss is getting great pleasure out of her not being able to log on, because he said she wouldn't be able to. If she comes home from work tonight unable to log on all day, I'm going to get it.

  2. #2
    Junior Member
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    Jun 2003
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    Are they running a DHCP server? If not, she would obviously need to configure her IP and DNS info - That's under System Preferences/Network.
    One other place she can try is in the Application Folder/Utilities/Directory Access. If you open that there are places to configure for Active Directory and also configure for a Domain under SMB.

    I run Panther on a Win2k Domain, and as long as all of the IP/subnet info is correct I've never had a problem seeing any of the other machines on the network.

    Hope those help.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
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    Jan 2003
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    Yep, they're running DHCP.

    I'll tell her to look under directory access. Thanks.


    --edit: He he....guess what the problem was?

    Well, I fired it up last night determined to log onto the AD server I set up, and I look at how she had been trying to log in. She had smb://server ip address /Name of the forest . As soon as I showed her to change it to smb://ip address /share name The little light bulb went off over her head. I just received a very pleased phone call from her telling me that she's looking at her home directory and now she's going to go give her boss the middle finger.

  4. #4
    Just Another Geek
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    Jul 2002
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    Rotterdam, Netherlands
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    Re: Getting Panther to log into Active Directory

    Originally posted here by thread_killer
    Ok, so my wife got herself a powerbook last Friday.

    She got it for work, and where she works runs Win2k and an Active Directory. At least, that's what I gather from looking at the client of her old Wintel laptop.

    Anyway, she' naturally very, very concerned that it's not going to log in to her network at work, thereby subjecting her to ridicule and finger pointing by the guys she works with.
    Not to put down any of your efforts but why doesn't your wife contact the admins at work? And have them fix it for her. It's their network anyway.
    Oliver's Law:
    Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    There are no admins at work. In fact, there are only 3 people who work in the office full time. There are two more who work 30 hours a week each, and my wife and another guy are the sales team and frequently on the road. Not only does my wife do sales, but she also designed and prints their brochures, does all their presentations for clients, and is working on their web site.

    Their normal guy (consultant) that comes in and does their network stuff was unavailable yesterday so they use anyone they might know. Hell, I've been asked to come in and fix their exchange server before and I know only slightly more than nothing about exchange.

    Small business is like that. I'm just trying to help the wife out. I'm sure you know how it is from the friends and family. "Oh, Bob works with computers all day, he must know how to fix it. Give him a call."

    Unfortunately they never believe me when I tell them if it doesn't say Cisco, Foundry, or Extreme on it, I'm not the guy for the job.

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
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    I'll vouch for that - Here at the company I work for, I get everything thrown at me. SQL, Exchange, Domain, Macs, Phone systems, and even a couple old Novell servers. Basically if it's got any kind of electronics inside somehow I must know how to fix it.
    I had one guy ask me last week if I could fix a regular power switch on a piece of production machinery - I referred him to the Electrician section of the phone book.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    421
    Check out AdmitMAC
    http://www.macsense.com.au/software_...y_admitmac.htm is one link I have.

    Works great for Joining a MAC to an NT Domain or AD structure.

    SGS

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