Microsoft to start developing IE again
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Microsoft to start developing IE again

  1. #1
    AO French Antique News Whore
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    2,126

    Microsoft to start developing IE again

    I donít think it was post. If it was, a mod can merge the topic or delete this one without warning.

    Microsoft has boosted the prospects for some enhancements to Internet Explorer by appointing a new member to its product management team. Some analysts believe the appointment means that the much criticized browser will get a polish before Longhorn is released and IE's importance begins to fade.

    Dave Massy, a technical evangelist at Microsoft, worked on the early development of IE but moved to the Longhorn team a few years ago--around the same time the company won the war against Netscape and appeared to lose interest in dramatically changing its browser. On Massy's Web log on Monday he claimed the move "isn't big news" but confirmed he would be working on providing the development team with requests from customers.

    "At this stage there isn't much more to add other than to reiterate the point that the Internet Explorer team does exist and does care," Massy said.

    "I've really enjoyed working on Longhorn as a technical evangelist and remain very, very excited by the capabilities that Avalon and Longhorn will bring but the time was right for me to return to work on a product team," he said.

    In June 2003, Microsoft announced it would not release any new versions of IE as a stand-alone browser. Instead, the software giant said IE would be an integrated part of Longhorn, the company's next major operating system.

    However, Longhorn is unlikely to appear for another two or three years, and as many companies are slow to upgrade their operating systems, it may not be in widespread use for up to three years after that.

    Microsoft has decided to improve IE because the company wants to protect its virtual monopoly of the browser market, according to Stephen O'Grady, senior analyst at Redmonk.

    "Longhorn isn't going to be delivered in the timeframe Microsoft originally expected and users probably can't wait that long for a stabilized browser. So as a stop-gap move, they are going to shore up IE," O'Grady said.

    O'Grady said that Longhorn will be designed to "blur the lines" between the Internet and the client, which means the browser will no longer be the primary link between the user and the Net.

    "There are a lot of technologies in Longhorn that de-emphasize the importance of the browser," said O'Grady.

    Richard Starnes, vice president of security industry group ISSA UK, welcomed Massy's move but said there is unlikely to be any noticeable changes for a long time.

    "If he can bring back the same innovative spirit running up to IE 5.5, we can look forward to a good product. But the problem is that it will take about 18 months," Starnes said.

    One of IE's competitors in the stand-alone browser sector is Opera, which earlier this year appointed ex-IBM Internet guru John Patrick to its board of directors.

    Patrick told ZDNet UK he is not worried about Microsoft improving IE or the arrival of Longhorn, but he hopes any developments will adhere to industry standards.

    "Microsoft has clearly neglected the browser for quite a long time. If they are going to pay more attention to the importance of standards, it is good news for everybody," Patrick said.
    Source : http://zdnet.com.com/2100-1104_2-5243248.html
    -Simon \"SDK\"

  2. #2
    Just a Virtualized Geek MrLinus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Redondo Beach, CA
    Posts
    7,324
    But the ultimate question is: will they develop it with security in mind or will it be developed with "ease of use" -- again?
    Goodbye, Mittens (1992-2008). My pillow will be cold without your purring beside my head
    Extra! Extra! Get your FREE copy of Insight Newsletter||MsMittens' HomePage

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    11
    Ease of use hopefully!
    What would I do with all my time otherwise? Right now I'm working on a computer that one of my users brought in from home - It had both Sasser and MSBlast on it, a few smaller viruses, and so much Malware/Spyware on it that it's rendered pretty much unbootable.

    M$=Job Security

  4. #4
    PHP/PostgreSQL guy
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    1,164
    In June 2003, Microsoft announced it would not release any new versions of IE as a stand-alone browser. Instead, the software giant said IE would be an integrated part of Longhorn, the company's next major operating system.
    Nothing new there....why would they not release a STAND-ALONE version? Is it because it's WAY too tied into the operating system and can't be backed out or do they just not want to? If I have a SA version, and it takes a dump, then my whole OS won't cascade-fault like IE has done in the past.

    I believe in integration. I do not believe in tying something directly related to the internet directly into your OS. *sigh*

    O'Grady said that Longhorn will be designed to "blur the lines" between the Internet and the client, which means the browser will no longer be the primary link between the user and the Net.
    How and can I get some solid working examples? Does this mean more "integrated" software bundles tied to the OS? How, with MS-anything, when using IE, do you NOT have a primary link between the user and the Net?

    One of IE's competitors in the stand-alone browser sector is Opera, which earlier this year appointed ex-IBM Internet guru John Patrick to its board of directors.

    Patrick told ZDNet UK he is not worried about Microsoft improving IE or the arrival of Longhorn, but he hopes any developments will adhere to industry standards.

    "Microsoft has clearly neglected the browser for quite a long time. If they are going to pay more attention to the importance of standards, it is good news for everybody," Patrick said.
    Hehe, good ol' Opera. I'm fairly sure nobody expected Opera to do as good as it did with the problems it had in the beginning but it goes to show you, fight and prevail can be a good option.

    I hope IE-whatever is standards-compliant. The whole Netscape/IE war sparked off major problems in the internet and places like www.anybrowser.org were started because it getting to the point to where people either had to use IE for everything (because nothing was written to standards, only IE-standards) or they had to have 2-3 other browsers installed. Just standardize! W3C exists for a reason!
    We the willing, led by the unknowing, have been doing the impossible for the ungrateful. We have done so much with so little for so long that we are now qualified to do just about anything with almost nothing.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

 Security News

     Patches

       Security Trends

         How-To

           Buying Guides