SPY Act
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Thread: SPY Act

  1. #1

    SPY Act

    Full article at http://www.securityfocus.com/news/8941

    The SPY Act, for "Securely Protect Yourself Against Cyber Trespass," would oblige companies and individuals to conspicuously warn consumers before giving them a program capable of automatically transmitting information gathered from a user's computer. Though the bill carries no criminal penalties, and doesn't allow users to sue spyware merchants, anyone in the U.S. caught uploading such a program without obtaining the consumer's consent could face civil prosecution by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).
    Well, at least it's a start. Could be interesting?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Maybe a foot in the door to some action, but why not.......

    Better yet, let's go old school on them.

    "Bosun, seize them to the mast and give 'em a taste of the Cat of Nine Tails!" or "Keel haul the vermin!"

    Arggggggggg,

    ehhh mate
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  3. #3
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    this will be nice and will definately discourage ppl who make keyloggers
    [gloworange]find / -name \"*your_base*\" -exec chown us:us {} \\;[/gloworange] [glowpurple]Trust No One[/glowpurple][shadow] Use Hardened Gentoo [/shadow]
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  4. #4
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    it's not always the developer's fault. keyloggers are usually designed for legitimate reasons, like the FamilyKeyLogger by kmint21 is used to check what employees or family members are doing online, but people may decide to use it maliciously. That's a big no-no.

  5. #5
    this will be nice and will definately discourage ppl who make keyloggers
    Not really, they are commercial products, people sell them.

    but people may decide to use it maliciously. That's a big no-no.
    No ****, using anything maliciously is a big no-no.

    -Cheers-

  6. #6
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    whoa, someone has an anger problem...

  7. #7
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    Sounds like a one inch bandaid for a slit throat how useful.
    Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.
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    -- true colors revealed, a brown shirt and jackboots

  8. #8
    whoa, someone has an anger problem..
    Whoa, someone has an ignorance problem.

    -Cheers-

  9. #9
    oldie ric-o's Avatar
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    Yep, it is a start but most likely IMO it will just remove some of the _legitimate_ spyware/adware. Legitimate spyware? That's a good one.

    Anyway, it wont help as much as the intent due to international jurisdictions and malicious (illegit) spyware...unless an international law is agreed to.

    I agree with some of the concerns about users presented with the _catch all approval_ upon installation AND an openly worded EULA...which is happening today. In a lot of ways, it's all about the wording of this ACT and let's hope the software lobbies dont get too many caveats into it.

    Wishfull thinking I will go

  10. #10
    I think lumpy hits on a good point though, it's a far cry from really fixing any problems, but at least it's a start. I wonder though, if any legislation will ever have a really significant effect? It seems next to impossible right now...

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