Outlook Express Gurus... Help Please?
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Thread: Outlook Express Gurus... Help Please?

  1. #1
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    Outlook Express Gurus... Help Please?

    A co-worker has recieved a file with the extention of .csv. We know what the file is and we were expecting it. Due to some security seetings in Outlook, it gives a message:

    "OE removed access to the following unsafe attatchments in your mail:filenamehere.csv"

    She will be recieving these files once a week. How can I allow these?

    Thanks in advance.


    FYI: I did check out the file and it is clean and safe.
    [gloworange]DISLEX[/gloworange]

  2. #2
    Outlook 2003, Outlook 2002 and Outlook 2000 SP3 (but not Outlook 98 or earlier Outlook 2000 versions) allow the user to use a registry key to open up access to blocked attachments. (Always make a backup before editing the registry.) To use this key:

    1.

    Run Regedit, and go to this key:

    HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\10.0\Outlook\Security (change 10.0 to 9.0 for Outlook 2000 SP3 or to 11.0 for Outlook 2003)
    2.

    Under that key, add a new string value named Level1Remove.
    3.

    For the value for Level1Remove, enter a semicolon-delimited list of file extensions. For example, entering this:

    .mdb;.url

    would unblock Microsoft Access files and Internet shortcuts. Note that the use of a leading dot was not previously required, however, new security patches may require it. If you are using "mdb;url" format and extensions are blocked, add a dot to each extension. Note also that there is not a space between extensions.

    If you are using this registry entry, a glance at Help | About Microsoft Outlook will show Security Mode: User Controlled above the license information. See OL2002 You Cannot Open Attachments for more information on this registry entry.

    To force users to save *.zip files to the hard drive before opening, add .zip to the extensions step 3. See How to configure Outlook to block additional attachment file name extensions for more information.

    If you prefer not to edit the registry directly, you can use one of these tools to make the change; not all support both Outlook 2002 and 2000:
    Attachment Options COM add-in by Outlook MVP Ken Slovak that adds an Attachment Security Options page to the Tools | Options dialog in Outlook 2002 to allow you to manage which file attachments are blocked. Only for Outlook 2000 SP3, Outlook 2002, and Outlook 2003. For Also provides a user interface for setting two other Outlook options -- Read as Plain Text (Outlook 2002, SP-1 or later) and Minimize to System Tray. Available in English and German. Shareware.
    Attachments Zip Compressor Automatically compresses outgoing attachments into .zip files. Can extract files from incoming .zip attachments or compress attachments in an incoming message. Can handle incoming files that Outlook blocks and put them into .zip files.
    DetachOL Standalone utility to change the list of blocked file attachments according to the level of risk you're willing to take. Free.
    Outlook Permissions Add-in Add-in for adjusting which attachments you can open under Outlook's increased security, for Outlook 2003, 2002 and Outlook 2000 SP3 or later. Free
    TweakOL Modifies the Windows registry to change the list of blocked file attachments according to the level of risk you're willing to take, always show the Bcc field, minimize Outlook 2002 to the system tray, and disable or enable MSN Messenger. Free. Outlook 2002 only.
    Xenos Outlook Security Extension Utility to manage file attachment blocking in Outlook 2000 SP3, Outlook 2002, and later. Also manages optional settings such as minimize to tray and purge data file on exit. New settings added in new Outlook updates are supported through online updates to the software. (Formerly Xenos Outlook Security Extension)

    After applying this registry fix or using one of the above tools, the user still has to save the attached file to a system drive before opening it. In effect, the fix rolls the attachment behavior back to Outlook 2000 SR-1, with its included Attachment Security Fix. An end-user cannot bypass this "save to disk" behavior and open the file directly from the mail message, though an Exchange administrator can.
    http://www.slipstick.com/outlook/esecup/getexe.htm

  3. #3
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    Ok in outlook express.

    Click Tools>>options>>security. In the virus protection area dialog uncheck the Do not allow attachements to be saved or opened that could potenttialy be viruses.

    Not a good thing to do however. Can your friend not use outlook instead of outlook express. There are more options to secure the email client.
    What happens if a big asteroid hits the Earth? Judging from realistic simulations involving a sledge hammer and a common laboratory frog, we can assume it will be pretty bad. - Dave Barry

  4. #4
    Senior Member DeadAddict's Avatar
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    Open outlook and click on tools then select options then click on the security tab and uncheck the box that reads do not allow attachments to be saved or opened that could be potentially be a virus
    Edit Jinxy beat me to it
    But make sure your coworker rechecks the box.

  5. #5
    1.

    Run Regedit, and go to this key:

    HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\10.0\Outlook\Security (change 10.0 to 9.0 for Outlook 2000 SP3 or to 11.0 for Outlook 2003)
    2.

    Under that key, add a new string value named Level1Remove.
    3.

    For the value for Level1Remove, enter a semicolon-delimited list of file extensions. For example, entering this:

    .mdb;.url

    would unblock Microsoft Access files and Internet shortcuts.
    Dont u guys think thats way better than allowing all attachments ?

  6. #6
    Super Moderator: GMT Zone nihil's Avatar
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    I would be inclined to have the file sent as a .txt, as in get the sender to rename it from ABC.csv to ABC.txt, then download it and rename it back to .csv

    I think that is a pretty secure way of doing things, as if you open a .txt file that is a virus, all that you see is the compiled code. This assumes that you use notepad/wordpad to open .txt extension files.

    Just a thought
    If you cannot do someone any good: don't do them any harm....
    As long as you did this to one of these, the least of my little ones............you did it unto Me.
    What profiteth a man if he gains the entire World at the expense of his immortal soul?

  7. #7
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    Exept it's for outlook express, not outlook
    What happens if a big asteroid hits the Earth? Judging from realistic simulations involving a sledge hammer and a common laboratory frog, we can assume it will be pretty bad. - Dave Barry

  8. #8
    Junior Member
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    Nihil has made the best suggestion. At one of the businesses I support, people can not except .exe files into their email client. So... Anybody that has to send an .exe file has to change the extension (usually recomennd .doc).

    Then the recipient would change the extesion from .doc to exe.

    It is that simple without tweaking the registry or allowing any attachment to come through (possible virus problem)...

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