Verizon Business DSL
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Thread: Verizon Business DSL

  1. #1
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    Verizon Business DSL

    Does anyone have any thoughts on Verizon Business DSL? On their website it says its only $40 bucks a month for 1.5M/385, which is less than I'm paying now for Earthlink home DSL!!

    I can't seem to find the TOS for Verizon Biz DSL, though, because I want to know if I would be able to run servers, including a mail server..maybe they'll only let you run a server/e-mail server if you buy the static IP too?

    Any opinions?
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  2. #2
    AO Decepticon CXGJarrod's Avatar
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    One thing that you might look out (with business DSL) is that to get business dsl (at least in my area) you have to have a business phone line. (Which means you pay for all local calls) Usually the static IP plans are the ones that they want you to get to host any sort of website. Some companies charge $50 or $100 if you want to host a domain name, but you can get around that. (They dont usually check) That is my experience with SBC at least.

    One thing to look at:

    From http://www22.verizon.com/Business/fy...OrderingId=VOL
    Benefits

    · Experience faster downloads with maximum connection speeds ranging from up to 1.5M/384K to 7.1M/768K (where available).
    · Share your DSL connection by setting up a LAN, allowing multiple users to access the Internet simultaneously.
    · Host your own Web site and/or e-mail and FTP servers with Static IP DSL .
    · Connect to the Internet while using the same phone line to carry voice or fax.
    This makes me think that they want you to buy the static ip to host a server.

    Also here is the terms of service for home users:

    http://www.verizon.net/policies/vzcom/tos_popup.asp

    Check out 3.6E

    Also check out http://www.dslreports.com for reviews on the service.
    N00b> STFU i r teh 1337 (english: You must be mistaken, good sir or madam. I believe myself to be quite a good player. On an unrelated matter, I also apparently enjoy math.)

  3. #3
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    Thanks for your reply, CXGJarrod. I called Verizon about it, and the guy said you don't need to purchase the static IP in order to run your own server, just that it makes it easier to run with the static IP. He also said that the TOS that you posted was not for Business DSL, so I'm guessing that the TOS on the website was referring to Residential DSL.

    I just hope that he knew what he was talking about and did not mislead me...
    Either get busy living or get busy dying.

    -The Sawshank Redemption

  4. #4
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    my companys paying around 75 a month for verizon biz class. depending on the distance from co and other factors. 40 bucks may be just an intro price like the intro for home is 29.95
    Bukhari:V3B48N826 “The Prophet said, ‘Isn’t the witness of a woman equal to half of that of a man?’ The women said, ‘Yes.’ He said, ‘This is because of the deficiency of a woman’s mind.’”

  5. #5
    you don't need to purchase the static IP in order to run your own server, just that it makes it easier to run with the static IP.
    He's right, but it makes it much easier. We almost switched to cable here but decided against for that very reason. With a dynamic IP, we were told our router might work with it (no guarantees), but if it did it would require configuration changes so that it could work with a constantly changing IP, whereas with a static IP it's much simpler. However, to get a static IP with cable, we'd have to pay more, so we politely bade them adue and stuck with DSL.

  6. #6
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    If you want to run a site on a dynamic IP, I'd recommend using a dynamic DNS service like http://no-ip.com .

    Cheers,
    cgkanchi
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  7. #7
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    I've used a dynamic DNS service in the past, and that's what I was planning to use if I got the service from Verizon. I just wanted to make sure that it is legal to run a server with Verizon biz DSL according to their TOS, and that they don't block any ports like my current ISP does (they block port 25, so I can't setup a SMTP server). I guess I'll have to find out when I set it up, and of course I'll let you guys know what happens.

    Thanks guys
    Either get busy living or get busy dying.

    -The Sawshank Redemption

  8. #8
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    To be honest I am not sure. I have used Verizon's wireless card. (Which I will say, was ****ing awesome for area, but the speed, was shitty.)

    Personally I am wondering what, the Downsides to SBC are. I haven't read there User Agreement, or policy.

    Also Cox, has a nice little deal going on right now, atleast in my area. Where you get Cable at 1.5/533 not positive on those numbers. For only 19.99 a month, now you have to sign up for 6 months. It is also only a introductory offer, but still, that is sweet.

    I am debating doing it, I will only be in the area I am in for about another couple weeks, to 2 months. But ****, my dad can use it. (If he ever figures out how to turn the computer on.)

    As far as running a server. Wouldn't the restrictions on that covered by there policy only block incoming trafic on certain ports?

    I can't really see, besides that how they can stop you from running a server.

    If someone has any idea, as to how they would besides that, please share.

  9. #9
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    Well, if the ISP blocks port 25 from getting to your computer, that would mean even though you are running your SMTP server on port 25, no mail is ever going to get to you, since it will be blocked. There is pretty much no way around this, because if you run your SMTP server on a different port, how are the other e-mail servers in the world know that its running on that different port?

    A web server would be slightly different, though, because you can specify the port number in the address, eg, http://whatever.com:81 (so in that instance the webserver is running on port 81). Plus, there are a lot of free web-redirects that you can use that will even foward the user to a different port.
    Either get busy living or get busy dying.

    -The Sawshank Redemption

  10. #10
    AO Decepticon CXGJarrod's Avatar
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    Originally posted here by whizkid2300
    To be honest I am not sure. I have used Verizon's wireless card. (Which I will say, was ****ing awesome for area, but the speed, was shitty.)

    Personally I am wondering what, the Downsides to SBC are. I haven't read there User Agreement, or policy.

    As far as running a server. Wouldn't the restrictions on that covered by there policy only block incoming trafic on certain ports?

    I can't really see, besides that how they can stop you from running a server.

    If someone has any idea, as to how they would besides that, please share.
    Cox (in my area) blocks incoming traffic on the first couple hundred ports. (Tried to run a server with them long ago)

    Downsides to SBC. Home users cannot run a server according to their TOS. (Pretty standard) Business DSL costs a lot to setup because you have to have a tech come out to the house ($250) and there are setup charges. (But they can be waived) Also you cannot have business DSL without a business phone line. (Which means you pay for local and long distance outgoing calls per minute) Also, they state that you have to charge a setup fee for hosting a domain, but they never check it. I am pretty happy with their service. (Business DSL at my house)
    N00b> STFU i r teh 1337 (english: You must be mistaken, good sir or madam. I believe myself to be quite a good player. On an unrelated matter, I also apparently enjoy math.)

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