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  1. #11
    Regal Making Handler
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    You say in your first post that you only notice a loss of performance and pop ups when surfing the internet. This would indecate that your problem is not hardware related.

    This would suggest that your install of McAfee has caused the problem. You say you have tried to reinstall windows but are getting errors, i take it you have tried to reinstall over the original installation and this is where you are getting problems.

    Re-boot to your install disk and choose the option to delete your original partition. Then go through the proccess of recreating a new partition and installation.

    You can check inside your box to make sure that everything is seeted properly befor you do this just to be sure.
    What happens if a big asteroid hits the Earth? Judging from realistic simulations involving a sledge hammer and a common laboratory frog, we can assume it will be pretty bad. - Dave Barry

  2. #12
    HeadShot Master N1nja Cybr1d's Avatar
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    The name is Cybr1d ....everyone gets that wrong lol.

    Ok back to the topic:

    I did a little research on those error messages you posted and here's what MS had to to say about them. Sorry if it looks shitty but this comptuer keeps hangin on me so I had to copy/paste to notepad while rebooting every 5 minutes.

    I'm thinking more of a hardware issue...I.E. Drivers...or even the peripherals. Unplug everything, and then reboot while plugging each thing one by one and test them all. I hope someone can explain the errors a little better.
    SYMPTOMS
    When you first restart your computer during the upgrade to Windows XP or when

    you start Windows XP, you may receive the following error message, where

    aaaaaaaa, bbbbbbbb, cccccccc, and dddddddd are hexadecimal numbers that may

    vary:

    STOP 0x000000ED (0xaaaaaaaa,0xbbbbbbbb,0xcccccccc,0xdddddddd)

    UNMOUNTABLE_BOOT_VOLUME


    NOTE: If you receive this error message when you restart the computer for the

    first time during an upgrade to Windows XP, your original operating system

    still works correctly. In some cases, a message appears on the BIOS report

    screen that states that the wrong cable is in use, but you may not see this

    message on computers that have a fast startup time.
    CAUSE
    This behavior can occur if either of the following conditions is true:
    Your computer uses an Ultra Direct Memory Access (UDMA) hard disk controller,

    and the following conditions are true:
    You use a standard 40-wire connector cable to connect the UDMA drive to the

    controller instead of the required 80-wire, 40-pin cable.
    The basic input/output system (BIOS) settings are configured to force the

    faster UDMA modes.
    The file system is damaged and cannot be mounted.
    RESOLUTION
    To resolve this behavior, use the appropriate method.
    UDMA Controller
    If your computer uses a UDMA hard disk controller, use the following

    procedures:
    Replace the 40-wire cable with an 80-wire UDMA cable.
    In the BIOS settings for your computer, load the 'Fail-Safe' default

    settings, and then reactivate the most frequently used options such as USB

    Support.
    Damaged File System
    If the second parameter (0xbbbbbbbb) of the Stop error is 0xC0000032, then

    the file system is damaged.

    If this is the case, restart the computer to the Recovery Console, and then

    use the chkdsk /r command to repair the volume. After you repair the volume,

    check your hardware to isolate the cause of the file system damage.

    To do this, use the following steps:
    Start your computer with the Windows startup disks, or with the Windows

    CD-ROM if your computer can start from the CD-ROM drive.
    When the Welcome to Setup screen appears, press R to select the repair

    option.
    If you have a dual-boot or multiple-boot computer, select the Windows

    installation that you want to access from the Recovery Console.
    Type the administrator password when you are prompted to do so.

    NOTE: If no administrator password exists, press ENTER.
    At the command prompt, on the drive where Windows is installed, type chkdsk

    /r, and then press ENTER.
    At the command prompt, type exit, and then press ENTER to restart your

    computer.For additional information about how to use the Recovery Console in

    Windows XP, click the article number below to view the article in the

    Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    314058 Description of the Windows XP Recovery Console

    If this procedure does not work, repeat it and use the fixboot command in

    step 5 instead of the chkdsk /r command.
    STATUS
    This behavior is by design.
    MORE INFORMATION
    The purpose of this behavior is to prevent potential data loss due to the use

    of an incorrect IDE cable for the faster UDMA modes or due to continued

    access to a drive on which the file system is damaged.

    Note that a variety of issues can cause file system damage, from faulty

    hardware to software configuration problems or viruses. You can run Chkdsk /r

    at a command prompt to resolve the file system damage, but you may lose some

    data.



    ----------------------------------------

    SYMPTOMS
    If you are running Windows 2000, you may receive the following error message:

    STOP 0x0000001A (parameter, parameter, parameter, parameter)
    MEMORY_MANAGEMENT
    For example:

    Stop 1A (0x00000001, 0x00000043, 0x00024893, 0xffffffff)
    The first parameter is 1, therefore the subtype is "The fork clone block

    reference count is corrupt. Only occurs on checked builds."

    Everything else, must be examined individually.
    CAUSE
    This issue can indicate the existence of a general memory-management problem.

    The error message that is mentioned in the "Symptoms" section of this article

    is a Windows 2000 Executive character-mode STOP error message.
    RESOLUTION
    To resolve this issue, use the appropriate method:
    If this is the first time you have started the computer after you install new

    hardware, remove the hardware and restart your computer.
    View the following Microsoft Hardware Compatibility List Web site to verify

    that the hardware and its drivers are compatible with Windows 2000:
    http://www.microsoft.com/hcl/default.asp

    For more information about your hardware, contact the manufacturer of your

    hardware.
    If you are installing Windows 2000 for the first time, verify that your

    computer meets the Windows 2000 system requirements, including the amount of

    RAM and disk space that are required to install the operating system.
    If Windows 2000 is loaded and no new hardware has been installed, restart

    your computer with the recovery options set to create a dump file. If the

    error message that is mentioned in the "Symptoms" section of this article

    continues to appear, select the Last Known Good option when you restart your

    computer. If there is no Last Known Good configuration, try to use the

    Emergency Repair Disk (ERD).
    For additional information about Emergency Repair Disks, click the article

    number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    231777 How to Create an Emergency Repair Disk in Windows 2000

    For additional information about the Last Known Good configuration and other

    Windows 2000 boot options, click the article number below to view the article

    in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    202485 Description of Safe Boot Mode in Windows 2000

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Stop 0x0000000A or IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL
    The Stop 0xA message indicates that a kernel-mode process or driver attempted

    to access a memory location to which it did not have permission, or at a

    kernel interrupt request level (IRQL) that was too high. A kernel-mode

    process can access only other processes that have an IRQL lower than, or

    equal to, its own. This Stop message is typically due to faulty or

    incompatible hardware or software.

    Interpreting the Message
    This Stop message has four parameters:

    Memory address that was improperly referenced.
    IRQL that was required to access the memory.
    Type of access (0x00000000 = read operation, 0x00000001 = write operation).
    Address of the instruction that attempted to reference memory specified in

    parameter 1.
    If the last parameter is within the address range of a device driver used on

    your system, you can determine which device driver was running when the

    memory access occurred. You can typically determine the driver name by

    reading the line that begins with:

    **Address 0xZZZZZZZZ has base at <address>- <driver name>
    If the third parameter is the same as the first parameter, a special

    condition exists in which a system worker routine, carried out by a worker

    thread to handle background tasks known as work items, returned at a higher

    IRQL. In that case, some of the four parameters take on new meanings:

    Address of the worker routine.
    Kernel interrupt request level (IRQL).
    Address of the worker routine.
    Address of the work item.
    Resolving the Problem
    The following suggestions are specific to Stop 0xA errors. For additional

    troubleshooting suggestions that apply to all Stop errors, see "Stop Message

    Checklist" later in this appendix.

    A Stop 0xA message might occur after installing a faulty device driver,

    system service, or firmware. If a Stop message lists a driver by name,

    disable, remove, or roll back the driver to correct the problem. If disabling

    or removing drivers resolves the issues, contact the manufacturer about a

    possible update. Using updated software is especially important for

    multimedia applications, antivirus scanners, and CD mastering tools.
    A Stop 0xA message might also be due to failing or defective hardware. If a

    Stop message points to a category of devices (video or disk adapters, for

    example), try removing or replacing the hardware to determine if it is

    causing the problem.
    If you encounter a Stop 0xA message while upgrading to Windows XP

    Professional, the problem might be due to an incompatible driver, system

    service, virus scanner, or backup. To avoid problems while upgrading,

    simplify your hardware configuration and remove all third-party device

    drivers and system services (including virus scanners) prior to running

    setup. After you have successfully installed Windows XP Professional, contact

    the hardware manufacturer to obtain compatible updates. For more information

    about simplifying your system for troubleshooting purposes, see "

    Troubleshooting Concepts and Strategies" and "Troubleshooting Startup" in

    this book.
    For more information about Stop 0xA messages, see the Microsoft Knowledge

    Base link on the Web Resources page at

    http://www.microsoft.com/windows/reskits/webresources. Search using keywords

    winnt, 0x0000000A, and 0xA.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Error Message:
    STOP: 0x00000026 (parameter, parameter, parameter, parameter)

    CDFS_FILE_SYSTEM

    Explanation:
    This is a Windows 2000 Executive character-mode STOP message. This indicates

    a CD-ROM file system problem.

    User Action:
    If this is the first time you have booted after installing new hardware,

    remove the hardware and boot again. Check the Microsoft Hardware

    Compatibility List to verify that the hardware and its drivers are compatible

    with Windows 2000. For information about the hardware, contact the supplier.

    If you are installing Windows 2000 for the first time, check the Windows 2000

    system requirements, including the amount of RAM and disk space required to

    load the operating system. Also, check the Hardware Compatibility List to

    verify that the system can run Windows 2000. If Windows 2000 is loaded and no

    new hardware has been installed, reboot with recovery options set to create a

    dump file. If the message continues to appear, select the Last Known Good

    option when you reboot. If there is no Last Known Good configuration, try

    using the Emergency Repair Disk. If you do not have an Emergency Repair Disk,

    contact your technical support group.
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Stop 0xC2 or BAD_POOL_CALLER
    The Stop 0xC2 message indicates that a kernel-mode process or driver

    incorrectly attempted to perform memory operations in the following ways:

    By allocating a memory pool size of zero bytes.
    By allocating a memory pool that does not exist.
    By attempting to free a memory pool that is already free.
    By allocating or freeing a memory pool at an IRQL that was too high.
    This Stop message is typically due to a faulty driver or software.

    Interpreting the Message
    Table C.5 describes the information provided by Stop 0xC2 messages. The value

    of the first parameter indicates the type of violation (see the Description

    column) and determines the meaning of the next three parameters.

    Table C.5 Parameter Listing for Stop Message 0xC2

    Parameter 1 Parameter 2 Parameter 3 Parameter 4 Description
    0x00000000 This value is always 0 The pool type being allocated The pool tag

    being used The caller is requesting a zero byte pool allocation
    0x00000001, 0x00000002, or 0x00000004 Pointer to pool header First part of

    pool header contents This value is always zero Pool header has been corrupted
    0x00000006 Reserved Pointer to pool header Pool header contents Attempt to

    free a memory pool that was already freed
    0x00000007 Reserved Pointer to pool header This value is always zero Attempt

    to free a memory pool that was already freed
    0x00000008 Current IRQL Pool type Size of allocation Attempt to allocate pool

    at invalid IRQL
    0x00000009 Current IRQL Pool type Address of pool Attempt to free pool at

    invalid IRQL
    0x00000040 Starting address Start of system address space This value is

    always zero Attempt to free usermode address to kernel pool
    0x00000041 Starting address Physical page frame Highest physical page frame

    Attempt to free a non-allocated nonpaged pool address
    0x00000042 or 0x00000043 Address being freed This value is always zero This

    value is always zero Attempt to free a virtual address that was never in any

    pool
    0x00000050 Starting address Start offset in pages from beginning of paged

    pool Size in bytes of paged pool Attempt to free a non-allocated paged pool

    address
    0x00000099 Address being freed This value is always zero This value is always

    zero Attempt to free pool with invalid address or corruption in pool header
    0x0000009A Pool type Size of allocation in bytes Allocation's pool tag

    Attempt to allocate must-succeed

    Resolving the Problem
    The following suggestions are specific to Stop 0xC2 errors. For additional

    troubleshooting suggestions that apply to all Stop errors, see "Stop Message

    Checklist" later in this appendix.

    A Stop 0xC2 message might occur after installing a faulty device driver,

    system service, or firmware. If a Stop message lists a driver by name,

    disable, remove, or roll back the driver to correct the problem. If disabling

    or removing drivers resolves the issues, contact the manufacturer about a

    possible update. Using updated software is especially important for

    multimedia applications, antivirus scanners, DVD playback, and CD mastering

    tools.
    A Stop 0xC2 message might also be due to failing or defective hardware. If a

    Stop message points to a category of devices (such as disk controllers, for

    example), try removing or replacing the hardware to determine if it is

    causing the problem.
    If you encounter a Stop 0xC2 message while upgrading to Windows XP

    Professional, the problem might be due to an incompatible driver, system

    service, virus scanner, or backup. To avoid problems while upgrading,

    simplify your hardware configuration and remove all third-party device

    drivers and system services (including virus scanners) prior to running

    setup. After you have successfully installed Windows XP Professional, contact

    the hardware manufacturer to obtain compatible updates. For more information

    about simplifying your system for troubleshooting purposes, see "

    Troubleshooting Concepts and Strategies" and "Troubleshooting Startup" in

    this book.
    For more information about Stop 0xC2 messages, see the Microsoft Knowledge

    Base link on the Web Resources page at

    http://www.microsoft.com/windows/reskits/webresources. Search using keywords

    winnt, 0x000000C2, and 0xC2.
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Can you folks please stop negging leprecaun for a second...I'm sure he learned his lesson. Sending this thread to suicide will not solve the issue at hand. THANKS

  3. #13
    They call me the Hunted foxyloxley's Avatar
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    http://www.sanx.org/index.asp

    this site is full of tips for 'tweaking' W2003Server, W2K, XP.
    check your fault code out.
    55 - I'm fiftyfeckinfive and STILL no wiser,
    OLDER yes
    Beware of Geeks bearing GIF's
    come and waste the day :P at The Taz Zone

  4. #14
    Hoopy Frood
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    Originally posted here by SDK
    lepricaun, You should NEVER attemp a low level format.
    Perhaps he meant zeroing the drive? I know I was confused about that once. Just a thought.

    Regards,
    Xierox
    "Personality is only ripe when a man has made the truth his own."

    -- Søren Kierkegaard

  5. #15
    Senior Member
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    Why the hell did whoever negged leprican neg leprican? He made a mistake, and maybe just said the wrong thing but meant zeroing out. Maybe you should have PMed him and told him of his mistake, so he could edit it... Are the negs really necessary?
    [H]ard|OCP <--Best hardware/gaming news out there--|
    pwned.nl <--Gamers will love this one --|
    Light a man a fire and you\'ll keep him warm for a day, Light a man ON fire and you\'ll keep him warm the rest of his life.

  6. #16
    Junior Member
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    just wanted to say thanx to all for the replies / ideas...

    i wansnt around yesterday and now i m seeing the most replies... unfortunately, still no luck with the problem, i ll give it some serious try during weekend ...

    thanx again

    regards
    Hey Hunter... I assume you have something against wings and for that you kill birds... I also have something against stars but i do not kill skies...

  7. #17
    no i meant low level format, indeed zeroing it, but with that difference that a lowlevel format is more secure, i do this all the time at work when we get a system in with problems of which i think is a software problem and the hdd tested ok, then i performe a lowlevelformat and repartition everything again, and reinstall the OS. therefore i don't understand why i should NEVER perform a low level format...
    and for those who don't think i know what a low-level format is :check here and here.

    if you need a tool to do this, check here

    this is the tool i use at work ( i know it's designed for maxtor disks, but it works great on other brands as well)

    as for those who do not know what i do at work, i'm a repair engineer, i fix computers.

    hope this clears things up, and please let me know why i got negged, i'm pretty curious!

    and thanks "The Grunt" for defending me

    [edit]b.t.w. i've PM'd the persons who thought they know hardware and think they have a reason to neg me, but as you can see above, i do know what i'm talking about, it's my job GD![/edit]

  8. #18
    Senior Member
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    Why the hell did whoever negged leprican neg leprican? He made a mistake, and maybe just said the wrong thing but meant zeroing out. Maybe you should have PMed him and told him of his mistake, so he could edit it... Are the negs really necessary?
    You wanna know why "Someone" negged him?

    Becuase SDK is a simplistic lamer. Question answered?

    And if people don`t care for this reply....
    NORML

    Signature image is too tall!

  9. #19
    AntiOnline n00b
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    Hi

    lepricaun though i Didn'tNegged you for this ........If you do need to erase the Data of your Hard Drive......High Level Fromet is a good and safe option........which should be used and not the low level format.......Or Zero Filling Utilities are a another Good Alternative which could restore the disk to the new Like Condition.........ok why not perform low level format on a regular basis .......Too Risky....too Time Consuming.........Canceling a low-level format of a SCSI hard drive before it has completed can render the drive permanently unusable.....I wouldn't recommend it to hame users to perform it as an alternative to High Level Formatting

    It was with the older Drives that needed Ocassional Low Level Formats because of the thermal expansion.......not the New IDE/ATA or SCSI hard disk.......


    The IDE or ATA drives we use today have all this information preset at the factory and a real low level format would destroy the drive or at least slow it down radically... you cannot redefine the tracks and sectors on these drives with a true low level format. Of course this is highly simplified for this discussion, but let us suffice to say that you cannot change the physical geometry of current IDE/ATA drives without destroying it... or what a low level format does is redefine the tracks and sectors on a hard drive. So... this is an old term that really does not apply to today's IDE/ATA hard drives.
    [b]Source [b]

    If you have SCSI hard drives you want to low-level format, you must generally have the utilities provided by the manufacturer of SCSI controller. These may be built into the controller, or furnished as separate software. This is the only way to safely low-level format a SCSI drive. If you use the wrong utility, you may find it very difficult to get your hard drive back to a useful condition.

    I also used to work for Microsoft Windows Tech Support ....and i never had anybody do a Low Level Format.....there was never a need for it to be performed ...Hight Level Format was Doing the Job....and at most Zeroing the Disk is Good....NOt saying it shouldn't be done alltogether ..there are times when it becomes necesary.....Like you said you work in a repair Shop and the things brought be pretty bad and could require Low Lever Format i don't know ......

    And the Original Problem as stated by the Thread Starter ..was more to me like memory related.....Going Straight for a Low Level Format should be the First Step to do.....Set procedure would be look at the Error message and try to locate the Center of the Problem and the Hard Disk he has is newly formatted i think ......

    The Point is why take out a bazooka to kill a fly ....Might back fire on you

    --Good Luck--

  10. #20
    Canceling a low-level format of a SCSI hard drive before it has completed can render the drive permanently unusable.....I wouldn't recommend it to hame users to perform it as an alternative to High Level Formatting
    this i know, perhaps i should have mentioned this at my post, but i meant ATA drives, and sometimes zeroing a drive once, will not do the job, and yes it's pretty timeconsuming, but if someone has already performed a high level format or cleared the mbr and partitions and repartitioned the hdd and it still won't work, then you have no other option...

    i've seen it before, zeroing a hdd and recovery (installation) still can not be done, after a lowlevelformat problem is solved... some of my collaeges would have already replaced the hdd although several hdd tests made sure that there is nothing mechanical wrong with it....

    but yes indeed, you should always let the program quit, never interrupt it, just like flashing the bios.

    b.t.w. would advising someone to flash the bios also be a bad advise, since it can also damage your computer...????

    if you let the program continue (bios) 99.9 out of 100 times nothing will go wrong, but it can always happen, and this i have experienced before, flashing a bios, and let the program continue, and system won't boot anymore after it...

    system dead...

    i say, and i would stick my hands in fire for this, a lowlevelformat is surely NOT more dangerous then flashing a bios...

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