Clearing the CMOS using DOS
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Clearing the CMOS using DOS

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    22

    Lightbulb Clearing the CMOS using DOS

    Hey folks !

    I came across this really neat way of clearing the contents of the CMOS without opening your box up and removing the cell.Here's what you do

    1.Goto the command prompt ( type in c:\command in run)
    2.Type the following

    c:\DEBUG
    -o 70 ff
    -o 71 2e
    -q

    3.Presto...Now your CMOS is a virgin again


    I've tried this out in many boxes.Hope this work in yours !

  2. #2
    HeadShot Master N1nja Cybr1d's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    1,840
    wouldn't the debug be different from one maker to the other?

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    22
    I know what you mean.But this works though for most pcs(Don't no why though).I guess the
    code depends on the CMOS .Anyone has better answers ???

  4. #4
    HeadShot Master N1nja Cybr1d's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    1,840
    I know what you mean.But this works though for most pcs(Don't no why though).I guess the
    code depends on the CMOS .Anyone has better answers ???
    Thats the thing though, we do not know for what makers that debug would work for . If I try that on my Compaq, and it doesn't work...bye bye OS

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    22
    True .. this method isn't all that specific!.Well...here's another.I didn't write this in the first place because it's kindda bad for the system.


    When the computer starts to boot up ( before the password screen comes up), remove the power !.If you are lucky you'll get " CMOS CHECKSUM ERROR" the first time.Keep on trying till it comes! (The cruelties you do to a pc just to get in !!!)

  6. #6
    Senior Member DeadAddict's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    2,583
    There are different debug scripts out there not sure if they work on all bios. but this site lists two of them and a few other things
    http://motherboards.mbarron.net/bios.html

  7. #7
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    12
    I can help a little
    the o command for debug is output to a port
    I saw this a while ago it won’t work for proprietary bios and it won’t mess up the hd
    the hd port is 170 DEFAULT (i believe) be careful playing in debug it will do what u tell it
    i have not looked into where u are sending the hex data ff or 2e
    but i have a feeling it is a false value that causes corruption
    or it is what generic bios (ami) use for reset

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    1,675
    Ok folks,

    Why not just restore the defaults. It's not magic or difficult. Just a mouse click away. I don't believe it varies that much from pc to pc. Why mess with fire. Cybr1d hit the nail on the head when he said:

    If I try that on my Compaq, and it doesn't work...bye bye OS
    cheers

    edit: What does this imply?

    (The cruelties you do to a pc just to get in !!!)
    Connection refused, try again later.

  9. #9
    Senior Member nihil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    United Kingdom: Bridlington
    Posts
    17,190
    As Cyber1d and Relyt have suggested messsing with the BIOS is not a good idea.

    This is ESPECIALLY true if you have a brand name computer such as Compaq, HP, Dell, IBM etc, as they DO NOT have a "native" BIOS version. It may say "Award" or "AMI", but it isn't!

    The "big boys" don't want the cost of running a large help desk operation, so they have custom BIOSes that have a lot of the options removed. This is to stop people who don't know what they are doing from messing around, then ringing up the help desk to get it sorted out. To attempt to use generic or third party tools in this environment is NOT a good idea. Any updates MUST come from the supplier.

    The same can be said of old ex-corporate machines that have come from large organisations. The company wants to keep its support costs down and improve security, so it specifies its own custom BIOS. I have even seen a machine where the BIOS would not let you add new hardware, or even replace a broken 3.5" floppy (there was a hidden menu).

    I think that the old saying "if it ain't broke don't fix it" is a very good one as far as BIOS is concerned.

    Cheers

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •