Computer Forensics Career
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 28

Thread: Computer Forensics Career

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    3

    Computer Forensics Career

    Hello all,

    I am new to the security field, as you can tell by my name. I am currently working as a web server administrator, and I have about 4 1/2 years of I.T experience. I also have a B.S in Computer Info Sys. I am very interested in moving into the computer forensics field, and I have thought about pursuing a M.S in Information Security, but I'm not sure it would be worth the money. The program is very expensive and, I don't have any forensics experience. I have also thought about becoming a certified law enforcement officer, but not to become a police, just to have a law enforcement background. Do you all think it would be wise to just go for some entry- level certs and maybe get certified in law enforcement V.S M.S in Info Security?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,130
    Computer Forensics career rocks, but is not like "C.S.I." show. Its pretty boring almost the time.
    I would like a Master degree in Security. But, to help you better, could you post here College Name and a link to the M.S. course? Will help a lot to make a comparision with "tech" courses...
    Meu sítio

    FORMAT C: Yes ...Yes??? ...Nooooo!!! ^C ^C ^C ^C ^C
    If I die before I sleep, I pray the Lord my soul to encrypt.
    If I die before I wake, I pray the Lord my soul to brake.

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    3

    Nova Southeastern

    The program is at nova southeastern. They are supposed to be certified by the NSA, But I don't see the school listed as one of the schools of excellence. This maybe because they just got started this summer. Anyway, here is the site. http://www.scis.nova.edu/

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,130
    Ive read MSIS curriculum on that site.

    I think is too generic. Too basic concepts and too few "sec" classes. maybe it was designed for I.T. people.

    If you a good knowledge of I.S., skip it (for forensinc career)

    Instead, seek out for a CISSP or try to go deeper into:

    - networking;
    - programming (including ASM)
    - investigation methods
    Meu sítio

    FORMAT C: Yes ...Yes??? ...Nooooo!!! ^C ^C ^C ^C ^C
    If I die before I sleep, I pray the Lord my soul to encrypt.
    If I die before I wake, I pray the Lord my soul to brake.

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    25
    I had to reply to this post. I was in your situion only a few months ago. I had graduted from a local university with a Bachelors in Information Systems/Application Development. I've always wanted to get into the Computer Security area, but found myself doing web devleopment for a very large company. Today, however, I'm living my dream - doing some very cool computer security work - and getting paid for it.

    So - my adivce. I read books, researched info on getting a masters in InfoSec and spoke with many many people in the field. What paid off for me in the end was the "informational intrerviewing" I did with people. I located several people who were currently in the field (using my carrer center at school and also locating people at my work who were in the field) and setup interviews with them. In these interviews I asked questions about the field and let them know I was interested in getting in the field and would do what it takes. I even picked up a mentor who taught me what to read, what to study and was there if I had any questions. In the end, it was my mentor who got me my job. Not my skills, nor my degree, although I am sure they helped :-)

    This is kinda long, but my conclusion is that it helps to know the right people. Get out there and make contacts!

    Best of luck,
    Smartin

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    3
    smartin77,

    Thanks for the advice. I think I will just focus on my job now, and just use those skills to open doors to get me closer to security. I definitely will be trying to build a solid contact list and I think I have a good jump on that right now. All I need to do is keep at it ,and something will come my way.
    As far as schooling goes, I'm lookng at going for the M.S in MIS, so I would have something more general and not so specialized. If I get into security and I like it, then I may look at some certifications. Thanks again.

  7. #7
    AFLAAACKKK!!
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,065
    I am in this situation now, I am wanting to get a job in computer security. I am thinking about trying to get a job with my local police departments computer crime unit, but I'm not sure what to do to prepare for such a job. I also do not think they would take me seriously because of my age, so I'm not sure if they would answer my questions. I'm only 17. What do you guys suggest for getting started for such a job?
    I am the uber duck!!1
    Proxy Tools

  8. #8
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    1,100
    Greetings:

    Computer Forensics is probably NOT the best field to start out in. It should probably be preceeded by YEARS of experience as an administrator and/or preferably a security expert.

    The knowledge that you need to become a Forensics expert is really just overlay on top of a very thorough understanding of as many different architectures as humanly possible.

    You're right, at 17, there is NO WAY you could get a job with anyone in the law enforcement field as a Computer Forensics Expert. To enter the forensics field in the law enforcement arena, you must be able to be certified as an expert in a court of law. A defense attorney would rip even the most knowledgable 17 year old a new one on the stand, considering they could easily call people that have been experts longer than you've been alive.

    There are very few Police Departments that employ full time Computer Forensics experts. Most of them rely on individuals in their communities to assist when needed.

    When I lived back up north, I was called upon on a regular basis to help with Computer Forensics work by local police departments. I got to go along to serve search warrants, secure and catalog the evidence on scene, do the analysis, write the reports, maintain chain of custody, and provide testimony as necessary. I was hired as an independant consultant to do these things, as are most people in the industry.

    The FBI has a full time forensics staff, but outside of that, most departments have a "Computer Crimes Task Force", which is made up of forensics experts from the private sector, and law enforcement officers that are pulled out of their regular day-to-day duties to work on a case when one arises. Usually these task forces are invitation only, and usually only experts and law enforcement officials are allowed to be around when any real case is being worked on. Chain of custody issues demand as much.

    If you want to be a full time forensics expert, I suggest you get a 4 year college degree in information security or computer science, then apply to the FBI (you need a 4 year in order to become an agent). They provide all of the forensics training for their agents in-house, which is as good as it gets.

  9. #9
    Computer Forensics
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    672
    Most law enforcement agencies don't carry in house experts as JP said, but they do have in house examiners. The program I am in for forensics places people directly in law enforcement agencies or other corporate environments. A friend of mine just got accepted to the state police force and will be serving as an officer for a few years, then he's getting moved to the forensics lab.
    I am currently working with sponsorship from a local police department and a few select individuals to further my forensics career, and the option may exist to get FBI sponsorship to attend the dcfl training or perhaps even to try to get in. i am trying to get a research project off the ground and running, but who knows if it will.
    What has it taken to get to this point? 7+ years now in the industry as an admin/consultant/engineer, long hours, lots of reading and lots of hard work, and hanging my nuts out there to get the attention of the right people. This hasn't dropped in my lap, and I don't expect that it will for most people. I personally wouldn't want to be an expert witness..I'd probably reach out and throttle the lawyers


    Antionline in a nutshell
    \"You\'re putting the fate of the world in the hands of a bunch of idiots I wouldn\'t trust with a potato gun\"

    Trust your Technolust

  10. #10
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    1,100
    Originally posted here by hogfly
    A friend of mine just got accepted to the state police force and will be serving as an officer for a few years, then he's getting moved to the forensics lab.
    Exactly my point! What in the heck kind of techie would want to play police officer for a few years just to become a forensics "examiner" eventually. I've never understood the mentality of departments that do this.

    ME chasing after some 300lb drunk biker dude that just beat the shat out of his wife, and 6 other men that tried to stop him? Haha, I think not.....

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •