32-bit Operating system
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: 32-bit Operating system

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    17

    32-bit Operating system

    hello guys can someone of u tell me wht is the meaning of this 16 -bit os, 32 -bit os or 64 -bit operating system. it is definatly not the processor on which it is running then wht is it

  2. #2
    BANNED
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    724
    Why is it not the processor it runs on. Or am I lost. Here's an explanation to the difference between 64 and 32 bit processors. And a 64 bit operating system is designed for a 64 bit processor.
    http://www.build-your-own-computer-t...rocessors.html
    When death sleeps it dreams of you...

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    149
    In Windows, this refers to the way memory is accessed. 16-bit applications access memory in 16-bit "chunks" (2-bytes). Most pre- Windows 95 applications are 16-bit (see also 32-bit)
    In Windows, this refers to the way memory is accessed. 32-bit applications access memory in 32-bit "chunks" (4-bytes). Large portions of Windows 95 and many of its new applications are 32-bit applications and may run faster because it has become more efficient to access chunks of memory.
    I learnt something also.....

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    1,207
    Usually a reference to the size of pointers that are used internally.

    Very confusing, because some operating systems use several pointer formats internally; Windows 95 is one.

    Just when you thought all the "thunking" (converting pointers from 16 to 32 bit or vice versa) had gone away, we now have 64-bit processors which can run 32-bit code.

    Oh joy!

    Basically the advantage of having larger address sizes is that you can address more memory with less messing around. The disadvantage is that pointers are larger hence take up more memory themselves.

    The first programs to use 32-bit addressing on i386 machines were mostly games. Games programmers wanted to be able to address large (well, several megabytes anyway) amounts of memory without having to worry about near, far, segment registers, and extended / expanded RAM (all of which is arse for a programmer)

    Slarty

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    42
    Is there any point in buying 64-bit processors today? Are there any applications who can take advantage of it or does this not come until later on?

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Near Manchester (England)
    Posts
    145

    Further to Tidalfaze32's post

    The reason a 32bit operating system is more powerful than a 16 bit is primarily to do with direct memory access and the length of the operator and operand in machine code. Along with the biggest number that can be processed!

    Taking direct memory access:

    8 bits can directly access 2^8 = 256 memory locations. That is 256 bytes ,i.e. not a lot. To access above this needs indirect memory addressing, which I won't confuse you with here, and is slower.

    It follows then that:

    16 bits can directly access 2^16 = 65536 memory locations - 64KB.

    32 bits can directly access 2^32 = 4294967296 memory locations - 4GB.

    64 bits van directly access 2^64 = 18446744073709551616 - 16777216 TB.


    Does that help to explain?

    Incidentally 8bit code will run on 16bit processor, and 16 bit code will work on 32 bit processor, but will not realise the potential of the processor. The reverse, however, is not true - 32bit code will not run on 16 bit processor.
    Tomorrow is another day for yesterdays work!

  7. #7
    Just Another Geek
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Rotterdam, Netherlands
    Posts
    3,403
    It's definitely to do with the processor architecture. But there's a catch; Intel based x86 processors have a backwards compatibility build into them. That's why you can run 16bit code on a 32bit processor. Motorola 680x0 processors are full 32bit beasts. There is no 16bit compatibility build into them. There wasn't any need for it.

    Hmmm. I wished everything was as simple as the good old 8bit days

    Brief history of microprocessors
    Oliver's Law:
    Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Near Manchester (England)
    Posts
    145
    Fair comment SirDice, however, I was attempting to give a simple illustration.
    Perhaps I should have included a link like yours?

    Yes, definately! Gonna have to stop hurriedly posting whilst at work!

    Note to self: Must try harder!
    Tomorrow is another day for yesterdays work!

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    634
    its the size of the internal registers used for the computations, things like eax, esi, al, cl.. if you decompile a binary youll see reference to things like that those are the registers used by the ALU (arthemic logic unit) so say you wanna add to numbers it be something like this - (please note my asm is shite...)

    push ax, 5 //note the registers are used for educational purposes and in real world
    push cl, 4 //my be unsuitable
    add eax, al
    add eax, cl

    its something like that, basically ur putting 5 and 4 in to al and cl respectivly, and then your using them values into the eax register where there added to what ever is currently in eax. incidentally the push and add instructions are converted into a binary code that is used by the ALU to select the operation required

    It should be noted also that the x86 contains 32 and 16 bit registers i think eax is 32 bit and cl and ax are 16 bit.

    so the larger the register the bigger numbers can be computed and larger memory locations can be accessed, Thats my understanding of it.

    If you wanna really learn about this then i recommend reading some elementary digtial electronics text, and then look into how ALU's work, u'll get a massive understanding of how it works and it will provide you with the knowledge should you wish to learn ASM.

    its not a perfect example, but it gives you an insight http://www2.ele.ufes.br/~ailson/digi...er05.doc3.html

    Ive just re-read your question and it definatly is the processor....thats like saying ok lets run linux on my sega master system, it wont happen cos linux is designed to run on 32 bit systems (however there are some ports on linux to 16 bit systems).

    how that helped

    i2c

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    634
    this ones better

    http://library.thinkquest.org/25111/alu.shtml

    more understandable to newbies

    i2c

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

 Security News

     Patches

       Security Trends

         How-To

           Buying Guides