Microsoft announces 'XP Lite' in Asia
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Thread: Microsoft announces 'XP Lite' in Asia

  1. #1
    Just a Virtualized Geek MrLinus's Avatar
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    Microsoft announces 'XP Lite' in Asia

    I don't know if this will do what MS wants other than create problems for those who get it. Let's be real. Those who want free OSes will go to Linux or pirate. Making this cheaper and downgrading the product so you can't really use it isn't going to stop someone from pirating the OS. I know how easy it is to get pirated software in Asia. I had a student once show me a 10-page sheet, filled with itty bitty print listings of every software and operating system you could think of for real cheap (generally something like $5-25).

    I do envision that the Internet is going to start being filled with more tech questions like "Why can't I run more than 3 applications?" and result for MS a somewhat worse PR image (bad product idea). I've bold the sections that talk about the "downgrades".

    Source: CNN

    Wednesday, August 11, 2004 Posted: 11:06 AM EDT (1506 GMT)

    BANGKOK, Thailand (AP) -- Microsoft announced Wednesday it would offer a low-cost starter edition of its Windows XP operating system in Asia starting in October, as it strives to hold onto market share facing erosion from the open-source Linux system and software piracy.

    Although U.S. software giant Microsoft still holds a commanding share of the desktop PC market worldwide, several major computer retailers in Asia in the past year have begun offering hardware with Linux installed.

    Industry analysts have described the launch of what already has been dubbed "XP Lite" -- with lower-resolution graphics, fewer networking options and less capacity for multitasking than full XP versions -- as a pre-emptive move against Linux.

    Linux is open source software available for little or no cost to computer vendors and users because no licensing fee is charged in its basic form.

    Microsoft also has said it hopes that the lower-priced products can help combat software piracy, which is rampant in the developing countries of Asia, where full-priced programs often are out of the reach of buyers.

    The new software, officially called Windows XP Starter Edition, is "a low-cost introduction to the Microsoft Windows XP operating system designed for first-time desktop PC users in developing countries," Microsoft said in a news release.

    Microsoft acknowledged earlier this year that it was working on the project, but kept details secret.

    The Starter Edition will ship on new, low-cost desktop PCs available through manufacturers and Microsoft distributors in Thailand, Malaysia and Indonesia, the company said.

    It said two more countries in the five-country pilot program would be announced later this year following further discussions with governments, and that vendors would be informed about pricing in coming weeks.

    Microsoft said key features of the new software would be "localized" help features, country-specific wallpapers and screensavers, and "preconfigured settings" for features that might confuse novices.

    The new software's "simplified task management" in which "first-time home PC users can have up to three programs running concurrently" represents a downgrade from the standard XP system. A full XP version can run many more programs concurrently, depending on the amount of memory in a computer.

    Other downgrades include "display resolution set to 800x600 maximum and no support for PC-to-PC home networking, sharing printers across a network or more advanced features such as the ability to establish multiple user accounts on a single PC," the company said.

    The new software retains standard XP features such as Internet connectivity, Windows Messenger, Windows Media Player 9 and digital photography support.
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    You're saying that this... piece o' poo of a program is suppose to combat open source? What's Gate's being snorting lately? Every version of Linux I've used showed to be MUCH better than Windows. Downgrading your product horribly is worse than the Spyhunter demo.
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    I think this might work. After all not every one is brave enough to try Linux. Even though it's free!!

    But the limitation of WinXP Starter edition is a bit too limited.

  4. #4
    AO Curmudgeon rcgreen's Avatar
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    And chances are that a simple registry hack, will "upgrade" you
    to full functionality.

    In the old days when a customer ordered the smallest mainframe in a range IBM had the option of shipping a machine with a bigger processor and more memory but with software which prevented the extra power and storage being exploited. If the customer at a later date wanted an upgrade then an engineer would arrive with his golden screwdriver and erase the code which was slowing down the machine. The result was a more powerful machine and a huge invoice for the upgrade.
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    Originally posted here by hongkongdragon
    I think this might work. After all not every one is brave enough to try Linux. Even though it's free!!

    But the limitation of WinXP Starter edition is a bit too limited.
    while people are not brave enough to try linux, there are many distro's out there (redhat, mandake just to name 2) that seem to be completely GUI like windows and mandrake especially seems like it would be easy for novices to adapt to. I can understand people not being brave enough to try something like slackware or OpenBSD but i don't think there is any excuse for people to not try one of the "easier" distro's
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  6. #6
    Senior Member DeadAddict's Avatar
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    The new software's "simplified task management" in which "first-time home PC users can have up to three programs running concurrently" represents a downgrade from the standard XP system. A full XP version can run many more programs concurrently, depending on the amount of memory in a computer
    This is fine for small children and for those people who don't do very much while they are on the computer but for other people it would just frustrate the hell out of them to no end.
    Other downgrades include "display resolution set to 800x600 maximum and no support for PC-to-PC home networking, sharing printers across a network or more advanced features such as the ability to establish multiple user accounts on a single PC," the company said.
    Same as above but how is the user supposed to learn about networking, creating and deleting user accounts Etc when those options are never present, I think they should be included with it.

  7. #7
    Macht Nicht Aus moxnix's Avatar
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    Don't forget now, that the average new computer user only uses one (1) program most of the time.

    Its not untill and or unless the user becomes familiar enough with their computer and OS that they would start to investigate the more esoteric programs and features that are available to them.

    Hell, the average user don't even know or care what a AV program is and could care less about a firewall. Allowing for 3 programs running would still allow for 1. Web Browser 2. AV program and 3. Firewall .
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    Originally posted here by djscribble
    while people are not brave enough to try linux, there are many distro's out there (redhat, mandake just to name 2) that seem to be completely GUI like windows and mandrake especially seems like it would be easy for novices to adapt to. I can understand people not being brave enough to try something like slackware or OpenBSD but i don't think there is any excuse for people to not try one of the "easier" distro's
    True or Lindow, which is too easy.

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