Intermittent access denied warning
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Thread: Intermittent access denied warning

  1. #1
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    Intermittent access denied warning

    This morning I had a couple of users get "Access Denied" warning messages when trying to access a shared folder on my Win2k3 server. They had not previously had problems accessing the folder and no permissions were changed. I restarted one of the machines, logged back in and had the same problem. I then shut it down, left it down for 15-30 seconds and restarted it. Logged in and viola, no more "Access Denied". Has anyone run into this sort of problem before? Is there a possible security breach somewhere causing this?
    [glowpurple]I\'d tell you about my paranoia but I think someone else is listening.[/glowpurple]

  2. #2
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    Could have been network slowdown or similar preventing proper Authentication..??
    You might not notice on login as cached credentials may have been used to login.

    SGS

  3. #3
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    Could have been network slowdown or similar preventing proper Authentication..??
    It was first thing in the morning with everyone logging in, but would this cause a partial authentication? The permissions for other folders went through OK. The permissions for this folder are set up a little different but I would think that it would be more of an all or nothing type problem?
    [glowpurple]I\'d tell you about my paranoia but I think someone else is listening.[/glowpurple]

  4. #4
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    Anything interesting in event viewer?

  5. #5
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    What are the client OSes??

    We have this problem with some 98 clients and a W2K server
    The client gets locked out??

    MS has a fix on their site

    <<817701 - Service Packs and Hotfixes That Are Available to Resolve Account
    Lockout Issues.url>>

    http://support.microsoft.com/default...&Product=sbs#7

    HTHs
    How people treat you is their karma- how you react is yours-Wayne Dyer

  6. #6
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    There are events in the Security Events that are catagorized by "Directory Service Access". These appear to happen when logging in and out. However, there were none of these events on the affected user's first and second logins this morning. Not until the third did these events occur.
    [glowpurple]I\'d tell you about my paranoia but I think someone else is listening.[/glowpurple]

  7. #7
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    What are the client OSes??
    They are WinXP Pro
    [glowpurple]I\'d tell you about my paranoia but I think someone else is listening.[/glowpurple]

  8. #8
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    I experienced similar problems in a little network with Win98/2k/XP machines mixed together. "access denied" messages were very recurrent. Even if it will not solve entirely the issue, activating IPX on your computers may reduce the frequency of those errors.

    Please don't ask me "why such an old antiquity like IPX?". It's weird, but it works for me.
    Life is boring. Play NetHack... --more--

  9. #9
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    Are your XP Pro clients logging into an Active Directory domain?

    As far as KissCool's IPX suggestion, he might be on to something - when I was having troubles with my W2K Server and Active Directory, I found a bit of information regarding usage of IPX helping to fix certain issues. It's worth a try...
    - Maverick

  10. #10
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    Originally posted here by KissCool
    activating IPX on your computers may reduce the frequency of those errors.
    I would think twice about the practice of adding an un-needed or un-used network protocol
    to your configurations in an office or production environment.

    Such a band-aid might coverup a larger potential larger problem, that needs attention.


    PacSec:

    Are you running a large network there?
    Switched Ethernet?
    Do you run corporate AV that may have been pushing updates slowing the network?
    Is DHCP in use? Did leases expire perhaps?

    Were these workstations laptops or standard PCs?
    I have seen power management on laptops kill network service (if enabled) and not activate properly right away...

    Just a few more ideas to play with...

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