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Thread: Router

  1. #1
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    Router

    can routers have open ports on them like telnet. what if you telnet to the router and login and did a DIR what would you get. And dose it have a OS, what is it

  2. #2
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    1. Routers have often telnet or web ports open, in order to let admin configure and monitor them.
    2. Routers have OSs. It is often some sort of *nix like OSs.
    3. Actually, "dir" is a DOS comand. "ls" would be probably a better try. Especially with telnet
    Life is boring. Play NetHack... --more--

  3. #3
    It also really depends on what type of router you're talking about. The common home systems (gateways, etc.) are usually administered via a web-like interface on port 80 or 8080, and usually only from inside the private IP range (192.168.x.x). If remote administration is turned on, only then can an external IP admin it.

    So, if you try to Telnet to that type of gateway specifically, you'll most likely get an error complaining of not being able to open the port/connection. If the admin of the gateway has a computer running behind it that is set up for comm on port 23, they'd have to forward that port at the gateway/router to that specific PC. In that case, then, you'd be Telnetting to that PC, not the gateway.

    l00p

  4. #4
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    Also, most routers store their operating system in NVRAM. There are really no "interesting" files on a router like you might find on a PC. Things you would consider "interesting" on a router would be the configuration files, access lists, version of the OS, and things like that. If you can pull up the config file that would give a lot of info about the network.
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  5. #5
    Originally posted here by InfiniteL00p
    It also really depends on what type of router you're talking about. The common home systems (gateways, etc.) are usually administered via a web-like interface on port 80 or 8080, and usually only from inside the private IP range (192.168.x.x). If remote administration is turned on, only then can an external IP admin it.
    l00p
    Although there are not quite as many routers that have a Telnet-based control panel, there are still many routers out there that use a telnet-based CP. Doing a little research, I found that some routers even have an FTP-based CP. However, most home routers use web-based authentication for the CP. I have run into many routers that can be controlled remotely over the years, most of which have the SSID of "linksys" and the password of "admin"

  6. #6
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    use a trojans or like a softer named "fpipe.ex"

  7. #7
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    not a lot of point posting to an old thread.

    btw - all my network HW has all mgtm disabled. you literally have to be physically near the device with a laptop and connect to the console port to administer it.
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  8. #8
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    Most routers will have the telnet port open. In cisco talk it is called their vty port or virtual terminal. And yes you can program and configure the router from this telnet session. The only thing I would mention is that there is no stored information on a router save the configurations such as has been mentioned earlier. The cool part about routers is that you can block or permit pretty much any port either by name or by port number and also the same with any IP address. I mean ANY ip address. Of course there are ways around that.

    Now word of warning. If you change any configuration on a router it will automatically log your ip address and state that changes have been made from that ip. (again there are ways around this as well but if you need to do that you probably shouldn't be in the router.) Ohh, if you do change router configurations illegally and get caught you are facing some really hefty fines. Depending on what kind of router you jack up and how long it takes people to fix the problem. Now if you drop a huge backbone router, (as if it would be possible to get into) but just speculating that you did it. They would lock you up and throw away the key. (that is if you are lucky)

    But if you are interested routers don't cost that much and they are cool to have on a home network.
    Hope the you like the info. Enjoy!

    Ohh, before I finish routers have their own OSs. Cisco uses its own cisco OS nothing like UNIX or Windows. A whole new animal. Some essential commands can be found on their website though.

    you can use the "?" or the "show" commands they work kinda like "dir" for DOS

  9. #9
    Senior Member treanglin's Avatar
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    LordWire what makes you ask this question?
    "Do you know why the system is slow?" they ask

    "It's probably something to do with..." I look up today's excuse ".. clock speed"
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