bypass firewall - p2p program such as kaaza, morpheus, etc..
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Thread: bypass firewall - p2p program such as kaaza, morpheus, etc..

  1. #1
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    Talking bypass firewall - p2p program such as kaaza, morpheus, etc..

    before this i'm using kaaza to download something from internet....to bypass firewall, i'm using hoopster. but recently, there are lot of problem with kaaza which is it contain too much spyware...

    then i move to another p2p software call morpheus, but the problem is i got a firewall and it not allowed this kind of software go to the internet...

    plz advice me...

  2. #2
    Super Moderator: GMT Zone nihil's Avatar
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    My sincere advice would be that if it is not YOUR computer, YOUR internet connection and YOUR network, I would not do it.

    P2P does represent a considerable risk to your system, and anyone else who uses it.

    Bypassing the firewall is not a good idea as it is bypassing your defences. So if you are on a school/college or work computer..........don't do it. You are quite likely to be detected and get into trouble.

    Take care

    EDIT:

    but the problem is i got a firewall and it not allowed this kind of software go to the internet...
    If it is your firewall, all you have to do is allow/authorise the application to access the internet. Remember that this can compromise your security.
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  3. #3
    Some Assembly Required ShagDevil's Avatar
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    Nihil, I agree with what you're saying but, I have a sneaking suspicion that grindcore is is trying to bypass a firewall implemented by someone other than him/herself.

    For starters, it makes me very suspicious that someone can install a firewall on a system/network, and not know how to add rulesets in order to allow access for new programs.
    This also bothers me as well:
    to bypass firewall
    What person installs a firewall on their system, proceeds to set up all the rulesets (whether automated or not) for each individual program and then just bypasses the whole damn thing?
    Lastly, I've tested about 4 popular firewalls (Norton, Kerio, Outpost and ZA) and not a single one of them, by default (out of the box), just blocks a program without at some point, asking for your permission to do so or making it easy enough to change permissions of any given program.

    Something just doesn't sit right with me on this one.
    The object of war is not to die for your country but to make the other bastard die for his - George Patton

  4. #4
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    ShagDevil: I think it's extremely unlikely that the OP means a Windows application-level firewall. (s)he probably means a hardware or dedicated firewall installed by the network administrator, which is doing NAT.

    Therefore it does not "pop up" anything, it just doesn't work.

    And grindcore, you really should not attempt to overrule the network administrator. If you have a legitimate reason for using p2p software (for instance, you are doing a university research project on P2P software), you should talk to your network admin and convince him/her to set up the relevant settings to allow you to use it.

    If you don't have a legitimate reason for using it, you should not do so on someone else's network.

    Bear in mind that to most companies, P2P is very dodgy software to have around, as its main purpose (although not its only purpose, I realise) is to circumvent copyright laws by enabling easy illegal copying of copyrighted material / software. Most companies try hard to ensure that they aren't violating copyright law.

    In the UK, if the BSA (Business software alliance) tip off the police and they have reasonable evidence, they will come in, and if they find a SINGLE piece of pirated software, they'll seize every computer in the building. Even if they eventually drop any charges, you won't get the machines back for months (yes, this includes servers)

    Slarty

  5. #5
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    Originally posted here by slarty
    In the UK, if the BSA (Business software alliance) tip off the police and they have reasonable evidence, they will come in, and if they find a SINGLE piece of pirated software, they'll seize every computer in the building. Even if they eventually drop any charges, you won't get the machines back for months (yes, this includes servers)
    Wow, this seems rather abusive! Has this this really happened? Hasn't anyone complained/sued as the costs for the lost of buisiness could easily outweight the value of the (non-physical "victimless") copyright infrigment (notice I didn't say crime since it really isn't... unless the laws in UK are much diffrent than in Canada...).

    Ammo
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  6. #6
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    ammo: Perhaps I was exaggerating slightly. But the BSA certainly have a lot of power to persuade the police to do stuff.

    To be quite honest, usually they just write letters threatening to audit companies, which is pretty effective. They don't touch small businesses (i.e. <50k of licences), and usually only work from tip-offs.

    And they don't sieze every machine, just every machine which *could* have unlicenced software on. For example, say you have 10 NT servers, and only 9 NT server licences, then they sieze all 10...

    In any case, they're not really going to do this unless a company ignores some threats, and an audit fails to show licenced software by a looong way. This is because the police and courts don't have time to prosecute companies for one or two licences.

    Slarty

  7. #7
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    Slarty: right, that makes more sense...

    I guess I was also slightly thrown off as I though (my bad reading) you were saying that any company which was suspected to have employees/users who had downloaded copyrighted material (ie: music, movies...) could be subject to extended search and seizure...

    While we're at it, this reminds me of a case we studied in my computer law course where a small law firm (duh!) was served an Anoton Piller order/injunction which allows the accuser to search/seize the defendent (with a juge's order of course) without the defendent ever being informed first when it is strongly suspected that the defendent might try to destroy the evidence of wrong doing if informed... (If it turns out the defendent was innocent, the accuser must pay for damages/lost of revenue incuring from the search and etc.). In that case, the law firm was indeed using illegal/unlicensed copies of NT (I think) and actually did try to destroy the evidence afterwords! They lost both the initial trial and their (loudly argued!) appeal ... Heh, lawyers. You'd think they'd know better!

    Ammo
    Credit travels up, blame travels down -- The Boss

  8. #8
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    Re: bypass firewall - p2p program such as kaaza, morpheus, etc..

    Originally posted here by grindcore
    before this i'm using kaaza to download something from internet....to bypass firewall, i'm using hoopster. but recently, there are lot of problem with kaaza which is it contain too much spyware...

    then i move to another p2p software call morpheus, but the problem is i got a firewall and it not allowed this kind of software go to the internet...

    plz advice me...
    OK i am going to advice you

    take you credit card, go down to your local bestbuy and purchase the software or music legally -- how would you like if it someone did not pay you for your work you did at your job?

    anyway (before you complain about high prices) -- if you are a college student or know a college student, you can get most adobe and microsoft software for close to 50 dollars (in some places cheaper)
    [gloworange]find / -name \"*your_base*\" -exec chown us:us {} \\;[/gloworange] [glowpurple]Trust No One[/glowpurple][shadow] Use Hardened Gentoo [/shadow]
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  9. #9
    Some Assembly Required ShagDevil's Avatar
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    I think it's extremely unlikely that the OP means a Windows application-level firewall. (s)he probably means a hardware or dedicated firewall installed by the network administrator, which is doing NAT.
    Therefore it does not "pop up" anything, it just doesn't work
    Slarty, key word being probably. We don't have a clue as to what grindcore is sitting behind whether it be a single system at home, a university network, nor do we know if it's behind a software firewall, router, a toaster oven, etc.. I think we would need a bit more information to analyze the situation properly. In my post, I obviously assumed that he/she was sitting behind a software firewall on a stand alone pc (which was a bit presumptious of me) but, you could be correct as well. Hopefully grindcore will be kind enough to elaborate on the issue.
    In any event, I don't think grindcore is the one responsible for setting up the security for the system/network and that's my main jist. Maybe the network admin set it up or the mail man or mommy, hell if I know.
    The object of war is not to die for your country but to make the other bastard die for his - George Patton

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