JAVA vs C#
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Thread: JAVA vs C#

  1. #1
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    JAVA vs C#

    hello,

    What is the basic diffrence between JAVA and C#.

    Thanks
    Laxy

  2. #2

  3. #3
    IMO C# is extremely similar to java in code...

    Java is platform independent... If you can get the JRE, you can run java. C# requires the .NET framework. You won't be running your C# executables on nix anytime soon.

  4. #4
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    Originally posted here by Soda_Popinsky
    IMO C# is extremely similar to java in code...

    Java is platform independent... If you can get the JRE, you can run java. C# requires the .NET framework. You won't be running your C# executables on nix anytime soon.
    Sorry to be contrary, Soda_Popinsky. (Though let me begin by saying that C# and Java are incredibly similar syntactically and in OOP style...)

    C# executables can be run right now on *nix, through 2 different ways.

    First, the Microsoft Solution:
    Microsoft Rotor
    This is Version 1.0 of the Shared Source CLI. For more infor on it, here's an interesting article:
    http://www.codeguru.com/Csharp/.NET/...icle.php/c4659

    The other implementation is an Open Source project called Mono. Check out http://www.mono-project.com/ for more information. The thing that makes Mono better than the M$ version is the GTK# bindings, allowing you to write GUI things in C# for Unix, I'm pretty sure that Rotor will only allow command line things to be done on non-windows platforms (as it is more for the showing off of the internal workins of the .NET JIT compiler...)

    One major caveate that supports Soda_Popinsky's claim is that Mono is lacks quite a few things and can only ever play catch-up to Microsoft (since it is a little hard to incorporate features that only Microsoft knows about). And Rotor really isn't for production, just demonstration.

    Mono is the reason why I've decided to try out C# (mostly because ASP.NET shows up more in job descriptions than PHP, of course I want to learn Java for that reason as well)

    So, it boils down to, do you want to write code for primarily Windows machines, or do you want to write code for practically every computer under the sun? If Windows go for C#, if everything the go for Java.

    Really most technologies are better at something then its counterpart, so deciding on what to use is a teliological process (look to the end to see what you need to reach that goal).

    I'm done babbling.
    Ciao,
    Dhej
    The owl of Minerva spreads its wings only with the falling of dusk. -Hegel

  5. #5
    An implementation of the runtime for the Common Language Infrastructure (ECMA-335) that builds and runs on Windows XP, the FreeBSD operating system, and Mac OS X 10.2.
    That's pretty neat. I just made the assumption that it wouldn't work on *nix because it's MS.

  6. #6
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    Soda_Popinsky,

    I just read a really interesting article about Novell and their big plans with Mono and C#. Apparently they are developing new applications for their version of the Linux desktop. I guess that means that SuSE will ship with Mono installed by default. (And it definately explains the gtk# bindings).

    I think the best part is that there will eventually be a really good C# IDE that doesn't cost billions of dollars and runs on something other than Windows.

    Sort of a fun development in the open source world.

    I can't wait to set-up my sandbox server again and put Mono on it.

    Dhej
    The owl of Minerva spreads its wings only with the falling of dusk. -Hegel

  7. #7
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    Let's get this right:

    Rotor, implements a small subset of the Framework APIs. It's made by Microsoft. It runs on FreeBSD and Macs.

    Mono, implements a larger subset. It's open source.

    Neither of them implements a large enough subset at the moment to run any of Microsoft's own .NET apps (which of course, tend to use Windows.Forms)

    The main purpose of Rotor, it has been generally agreed, is for Microsoft to try to pollute open source projects with their IP so they can use it in future lawsuits against anyone distributing open source apps.

    Slarty

  8. #8
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    Slarty..., when I first ran into Rotor I got the impression that Microsoft was hoping it would work its way into a source tree somewhere and they'd be able to close down the project ('m assuming there aim is too be able to kill Mono)

    It's just something about the way MS phrases things on the site that hosts it. Something about showing of the advanced features of a modern CLR. Fishy.

    Mono is still a good option for chumps like me that have as many servers and technologies running on a sandbox server. I just like to get familiar with technologies. The day that i can afford a windows server just to play with is quite distant in the future.
    The owl of Minerva spreads its wings only with the falling of dusk. -Hegel

  9. #9
    Java Not Dependent of any platform , well though to C# , i am new to it.

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