To learn C or C++ ? - Page 2
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Thread: To learn C or C++ ?

  1. #11
    Ninja Code Monkey
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    I don't care what some half wit selling books to other half wits states. As I said before, they share part of a syntax, that is as far as it really goes. They share c syntax at that, maybe a few other keywords/language constructs...but then they also share with other languages. There are also similarities between the way c# handles some things and the way it's done in VB.
    "When I get a little money I buy books; and if any is left I buy food and clothes." - Erasmus
    "There is no programming language, no matter how structured, that will prevent programmers from writing bad programs." - L. Flon
    "Mischief my ass, you are an unethical moron." - chsh
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  2. #12
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    The man is a world known and respected author and expert in C++/C/Java... I repect his word over yours.

  3. #13
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    C++ being the parent for Java makes absolutely no sense. For a parent child relationship, there has to be an evolutionary step forward present, Java makes some steps forward, and some backward, overall placing it at around the same evolutionary level of C++, although targeted at completely different types of projects. Some things are a step forward, like encouraging the use of non-native types (Integer vs int, etc), the large library of functionality that comes with, etc.. Some are a step backward. One example of this in my mind is being limited to a single parent class and forcing developers to use interfaces instead of being able to extend multiple classes.

    EDIT:
    Originally posted here by God's Whore
    The man is a world known and respected author and expert in C++/C/Java... I repect his word over yours.
    Amusingly, the company that created Java mentions nothing of this supposed "C++ Heritage", therefore any such claims, while amusing, are unfounded. C++ supports wholly simpler ways to access IO Streams, Java does not. Java adheres strictly to an Object Oriented design for a language, while C++ doesn't.

    Whether someone is a "world known and respected author and expert in C++/C/Java" doesn't mean he's any bit of a historian, nor does it mean his research on such matters is accurate. Simply because a language shares its syntax with another (which isn't even true of C++ and Java) doesn't mean it is a parent/child language.
    Chris Shepherd
    The Nelson-Shepherd cutoff: The point at which you realise someone is an idiot while trying to help them.
    \"Well as far as the spelling, I speak fluently both your native languages. Do you even can try spell mine ?\" -- Failed Insult
    Is your whole family retarded, or did they just catch it from you?

  4. #14
    Ninja Code Monkey
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    Yes, but you're also one of the half wits buying his book.

    The languages in question all have similarities, but are all very different. I've developed a great many applications, applets, etc in each of the languages mentioned and actively work in the field. Have you? Can you tell me about the differences in the way that java, c++, and c# store and use their base data types? The way they handle references and threading? The way they initialize their data? How about the way they work with strings? The compile process and what is done to actually get the resulting code?

    What exactly qualifies c++ for it's parenthood other than some passing similarities in syntax and a few shared keywords?

    (to summarize for those who don't want to do alot of reading....bite me noob.)
    "When I get a little money I buy books; and if any is left I buy food and clothes." - Erasmus
    "There is no programming language, no matter how structured, that will prevent programmers from writing bad programs." - L. Flon
    "Mischief my ass, you are an unethical moron." - chsh
    Blog of X

  5. #15
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    Again, I'm not as expierenced as you and don't know the specifics of either language as well as you do thus I purchased the book to learn it, but prove your point and contact the author and argue your points with someone who does know what they are talking about.. I'm taking this from the contact page from the book:

    (217) 586-4683
    Herbert Schildt

  6. #16
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    Hi!
    Well if you are already knowing some of the basics of c++ i recommend you to continue furnishing your skills in c+ as it is avery vast language and most of the basic programming methodology has been shaped by c++'s OOPs concepts. If you are interested then you can try the book: Turbo C++ by Robert Lafore

  7. #17
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    Since, now most of the members here advise me to continue C++. Now is to pick up a good book for C++, what should i read up on? i only have basics in C++.

    Since C++ orginates from C. So after picking up C++, so i will pick up C as well?

    Can some one explains Visual c++.net, ansi c++, mfc, win32. it seems to be a very complex issue

  8. #18
    Custom User
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    Visual C++.net and ansi C++ are different variants of the C++ language (AFAIK: unless Visual C++.net cannot actually be described as C++ :P). ansi C++ is what could be considered "correct" C++ in that it is the standard set down by the American National Standards Institute for the C++ language.

    Visual C++.net is a microsoft C++ compiler and supports features that the ansi standard does not support (and conversely probably does not support all the ansi features). As well as Visual C++.net, there are other versions like Borland Turbo C++ and C++ Builder, gcc and mingw32.

    Basically the difference comes down to the compiler that is used. If a different compiler is used, it will support different parts of the language, and will interpret (used loosely) the code in different ways from other compilers. So the code that you write for Visual C++.net will not work with an ansi standard compiler.

    MFC stands for Microsoft Foundation Classes. As far as I am aware, these are C++ classes (if you do not understand that term, you will if you learn C++. I will post a link to some information on classes, objects, etc. at the end of my post) created by microsoft to make programming for windows easier and faster. I believe it is somewhat like the awt or swing packages for java, but could not be certain.

    win32 is the 32-bit windows architecture. I cannot give you detailed information on this issue as I do not know enough, but I would doubt that you really need to worry about it at the moment if you are just wanting to learn C++. Basically, code written for windows 9x and ME operating systems are win32 programs, and cannot be run on operating systems which are not win32 operating systems (sorry for the bad explanation).

    http://en.wikipedia.com/ <-- an online dictionary that you can search for terms that you do not understand on.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microso...dation_Classes <-- information about MFC

    http://www.quiver.freeserve.co.uk/OOP1.htm <-- not the most amazing explanation, but it should be an interesting read for you

    Hope that helped you somewhat and wasn't too confusing.

    ac

  9. #19
    Ninja Code Monkey
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    For two excellent references on c++ and stl please see my previous post in this thread - http://www.antionline.com/showthread...945#post790032 .

    Gothic, what you have for the differences between vc++.net and ansi c++ isn't quite right.

    vc++.net can be used with non managed c++ (such as ansi c++) or with the .net managed code (the newer .net version of c++). They are pushing people to start using managed code because of all of the .net framework goodies they've added to make coding simpler and safer.
    "When I get a little money I buy books; and if any is left I buy food and clothes." - Erasmus
    "There is no programming language, no matter how structured, that will prevent programmers from writing bad programs." - L. Flon
    "Mischief my ass, you are an unethical moron." - chsh
    Blog of X

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