New here: What's a good book to help get me started?
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: New here: What's a good book to help get me started?

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3

    New here: What's a good book to help get me started?

    Hey guys,
    This is my first post here and I was wondering if any you guys could recommend a good book to help me pick up on some key computer security fundamentals, especially pertaining to Windows 9x and XP.

    Thanks!

    Steve

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    421
    A simple search of the thousands of posts here will net you many interesting choices.

    Oh and did you try Google?

    You can also park your behind at a Barnes & Noble for a few hours or even your public
    library. Open some books and see what catches your eye.

  3. #3
    I only found app: 5,860 books (some results may be duplicates) on B&N ...it's your choice now !

    http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo...vS&cds2Pid=946

    btw: the first one is fiction, but a good interesting read anyways !
    StreetsCrack.com Join The Best Music Social Network Online. Music downloads, promotions, forums, profile, games etc...

  4. #4
    Senior Member PacketThirst's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    258
    If you are new to networking


    Start off with " Tcp/Ip for dummies ". Its a really neat book for beginners.
    Then read something like " Networking for Dummies ".

    Now the network security part ...

    "An Unofficial guide To Ethical Hacking " is a really good book to start with . Though this book is of the " copy and paste " type, everything's presented in a simple manner.

    "Hack Attacks Revealed" By Wiley books is a mammooth book covering a lot of topics.This book
    is suitable for someone who's got some intermediate concept about network security.


    Who wants to spend cash on books when we've got lots of free sources of information online ????? Antionline is no short of good study materials.Check out the Tutorial Forums !!!

  5. #5
    StreetsCrack.com Join The Best Music Social Network Online. Music downloads, promotions, forums, profile, games etc...

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    184
    Originally posted here by 妯py展ght
    I only found app: 5,860 books (some results may be duplicates) on B&N ...it's your choice now !

    http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo...vS&cds2Pid=946

    btw: the first one is fiction, but a good interesting read anyways !
    you only found that many...lol
    well yah for that they have XP AND 9X for dummies books and the intro books and some others...etc

    the best bet is to go to local library they will have every windows possibly known to you right now. 3.1 to XP PRO , an they would all be intro or help topics in anything you would like to know or you can do the normal and hit some bookstores or online shop for some... and search through google (google)( best thing know to computer nerd )...lol

  7. #7
    Just a Virtualized Geek MrLinus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Redondo Beach, CA
    Posts
    7,324
    "An Unofficial guide To Ethical Hacking " is a really good book to start with . Though this book is of the " copy and paste " type, everything's presented in a simple manner
    I wouldn't recommend this book. How can it be ethical hacking if the author cannot even be ethical about writing the book? That said, I usually have students start with the one that I started with and it still seems to be the best out there, IMO, as a beginner book: Hacking Exposed. You should be able to find this in any book store.
    Goodbye, Mittens (1992-2008). My pillow will be cold without your purring beside my head
    Extra! Extra! Get your FREE copy of Insight Newsletter||MsMittens' HomePage

  8. #8
    Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    843
    Hacking exposed is better? All they do is give a brief description of something and show where you can download tools to aid you. All of these books are the same BS. And anything that tosses the H word is bound to be crap. If you've actually read them you'll notice that the first few books tottaly suck balls and are just basicly advertiseing their other books... the only ones worth a darn is linux and web-apps exposed. Besides maybe those two I just mentioned and maybe a thick 700 something page book on C++ I find PC books to be a waste of time (and money)...

    I don't see why I should pay 30 to 70 $$$ for a stinking book like hacking exposed, yet alone the book along with those stupid CDs with an ass-hat who runs programs and tries to look young, hip, & cool while doing it.

    But seriously, god forbid one of these books take the time to explain the concept of actually reversing someone else's software & makeing your own findings of flaws... but instead you'd be buying a big red book full of stuff thats months old, most of which you'd find posted up on some software-bug and vulnerability archives anywhere from one week to nearly half a year before books like that even manage to be placed on shelves. I am honestly amazed at how these people put securityfocus.com on a roll of toilet paper and call it a best selling book.

  9. #9
    Antionline Herpetologist
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    1,165
    "An Unofficial guide To Ethical Hacking " is a really good book to start with . Though this book is of the " copy and paste " type, everything's presented in a simple manner.
    Ummm.... no it's not. He didn't even have the brains to plagarize good tutorials .

    Cheers,
    cgkanchi
    Buy the Snakes of India book, support research and education (sorry the website has been discontinued)
    My blog: http://biology000.blogspot.com

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    1,255
    Originally posted here by TheSpecialist
    Hacking exposed is better? All they do is give a brief description of something and show where you can download tools to aid you. All of these books are the same BS. And anything that tosses the H word is bound to be crap. If you've actually read them you'll notice that the first few books tottaly suck balls and are just basicly advertiseing their other books... the only ones worth a darn is linux and web-apps exposed. Besides maybe those two I just mentioned and maybe a thick 700 something page book on C++ I find PC books to be a waste of time (and money)...
    For certain very specific things I am inclined to agree. For me, it is far faster and more efficient to hit up the Apache 2 Directives Quick-Reference, or the J2SE API Docs than it is to look such things up in a book. However, I have found Programming Jakarta Struts to be far more informative than any of the online struts reference sites I've been able to dig up. When making use of struts, I tend to refer to the book more than an online source. In my opinion, it's really about finding accurate information in the quickest, best presented way. If you hate reading books, you probably aren't going to come onto a forum and ask for books now are you?

    But seriously, god forbid one of these books take the time to explain the concept of actually reversing someone else's software & makeing your own findings of flaws...
    Reverse engineering is a very specific thing and isn't necessarily something everyone wants to get into. It isn't a requirement for security research although it does help.

    Tools are meant to automate and ease tasks. Tools like libwhisker simplify the process of cookie attacks, specific types of POST data, and so on.

    but instead you'd be buying a big red book full of stuff thats months old, most of which you'd find posted up on some software-bug and vulnerability archives anywhere from one week to nearly half a year before books like that even manage to be placed on shelves.
    Why buy apples at a grocery store when you can just pick them off a tree at an orchard? Even if a book is 100% plagiarized works (which is bad, don't get me wrong), if it reorganizes the information into a more presentable and learning-friendly way it is still worth something.
    I have several books sitting on my shelf that I don't need. Why do I have them? For reference. At one time or another I have found it quicker to refresh my memory by referring to the books than sift through a 10000+ email per month mailling list, or even a reference site.
    Chris Shepherd
    The Nelson-Shepherd cutoff: The point at which you realise someone is an idiot while trying to help them.
    \"Well as far as the spelling, I speak fluently both your native languages. Do you even can try spell mine ?\" -- Failed Insult
    Is your whole family retarded, or did they just catch it from you?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

 Security News

     Patches

       Security Trends

         How-To

           Buying Guides