Hacker sentenced
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Thread: Hacker sentenced

  1. #1
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    Hacker sentenced

    this posting is for all the guys out there into the practice of "learning" by trying to break/hack into a network they aren't authorized to. 9 years....!!!

    CHARLOTTE, N.C. ó One of three Michigan men who hacked into the national computer system of Lowe's hardware stores and tried to steal customers' credit-card information was sentenced Wednesday to nine years in an American federal prison.

    The U.S. government said it is the longest prison term ever handed down in a U.S. computer crime case.

    Brian Salcedo, 21, of Whitmore Lake, Mich., pleaded guilty in August to conspiracy and other hacking charges.

    Mr. Salcedo's sentence, imposed by U.S. District Judge Lacy Thornburg, exceeds that given to the hacker Kevin Mitnick, who spent more than five and a half years behind bars, according to a U.S. Justice Department Web site that tracks cyber-crime prosecutions.

    "I think the massive amount of potential loss that these defendants could have imposed was astounding, so that's what caused us to seek a substantial sentence against Mr. Salcedo," federal prosecutor Matthew Martens said.

    Two other men are awaiting sentencing in the Lowe's case. One of them, Adam Timmins, became one of the first people convicted of "wardriving," in which hackers go around with an antenna, searching for vulnerable wireless Internet connections.

    Prosecutors said the three men tapped into the wireless network of a Lowe's store in Southfield, Mich., used that connection to enter the chain's central computer system in North Wilkesboro, N.C., and installed a program to capture credit-card information.

    Lowe's officials said the men did not obtain any such information.

    The case was prosecuted in Charlotte because it is home to an FBI cyber-crime task force.

    Mr. Mitnick led the FBI on a three-year manhunt that ended in 1995 and is said to have cost companies millions of dollars by stealing their software and altering computer information. Victims included Motorola, Novell, Nokia and Sun Microsystems.
    More cowbell! We need more cowbell!
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  2. #2
    AO French Antique News Whore
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    Nice one but next time, put your source as a link to be legal.
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  3. #3
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    Hacker sentenced / Associated Press

    http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wir...C-RSSFeeds0312

    hope the link works.

    21 + 9 = ~ 30 yrs when he gets out. that's not that bad. still plenty of time to start a new life.
    More cowbell! We need more cowbell!
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  4. #4
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    Originally posted here by secure_lockdown
    still plenty of time to start a new life.
    Maybe somebody else's life... after a sentence in a federal prison of this length it's not a lot that he'll be able to do IMO.

    This is more than learning. He had malicious intent in his penetration of the network. While I might be arguing pro-Lamo, I won't do it for this guy. It wasn't just unauthorized entry or maybe information retrieval... this was CC fraud and he might've done more if he had time.

    However knowing how drug dealers and rapists sometimes get lighter sentences I can't help but fell rage at how an activity that's so easily misunderstood can give rise to such sentences... Money talks in the world, and money talks loudest in the US. What he did was wrong... but was it this bad?

    Setting examples sometimes doesn't deter others... it makes them join together.
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  5. #5
    this posting is for all the guys out there into the practice of "learning" by trying to break/hack into a network they aren't authorized to. 9 years....!!!
    Actually, I think you meant to say:

    This posting is for all the guys out there into the practice of stealing credit card numbers by trying to break/crack into a network they aren't authorized to.

    The rest of us not here to try and practice stealing credit card numbers will continue on about their buisness.

  6. #6
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    Originally posted here by poohsuntzu
    Actually, I think you meant to say:

    This posting is for all the guys out there into the practice of stealing credit card numbers by trying to break/crack into a network they aren't authorized to.

    The rest of us not here to try and practice stealing credit card numbers will continue on about their buisness.
    i side with you poohsuntzu, believe me, but the issues here and problem is (as has been debated on this forum many times before), ...

    GOOD LUCK trying to convince someone that you *weren't* trying to steal credit card info or you didn't have malicious intent.

    remember, *you* are the un-invited/un-authorized party and *they* are the ones with the proof that you where where you shouldn't have been. and no one is going to gave a $hit when was the last time the local sys. admin patched what.

    the point of my post is, this stuff doesn't get get punished by a little slap on the wrist anymore.
    More cowbell! We need more cowbell!
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  7. #7
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    'tried to steal' this part is shaky to me. I'm glad I know people that intend to become lawyers and have a good grounding in computers and things associated with them. How was this intent proven in a court of law?

    I suppose the analogy of a thief being in your house was something used... if somebody's in your house then he probbaly wants to steal all the stuff you own... Maybe we should hold all drivers accountable for possibly speeding if they drive a sportscar and fine them as the leave the lot...
    /\\

  8. #8
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    Originally posted here by hypronix
    However knowing how drug dealers and rapists sometimes get lighter sentences I can't help but fell rage at how an activity that's so easily misunderstood can give rise to such sentences... Money talks in the world, and money talks loudest in the US. What he did was wrong... but was it this bad?

    Setting examples sometimes doesn't deter others... it makes them join together.
    Drug dealers shouldn't be put behind bars in the first place. Neither should rapists. Rapists should be shot, Dealers should be given a lisence.

  9. #9
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    'tried to steal' this part is shaky to me. I'm glad I know people that intend to become lawyers and have a good grounding in computers and things associated with them. How was this intent proven in a court of law?

    I suppose the analogy of a thief being in your house was something used... if somebody's in your house then he probbaly wants to steal all the stuff you own... Maybe we should hold all drivers accountable for possibly speeding if they drive a sportscar and fine them as the leave the lot...
    Yea i would like to know what proof they used to prove they wanted to steal the numbers because it just says that they put a prog but what did this program actually do maybe it was a keylogger or a backdoor or rootkit any of those could be interpreted as trying to steal any thing you wanted so maybe they didnít want the card numbers but its their would agents a prosecutor and when you get a jury who donít know windows from Linux or the difference that using firefox would make instead of IE how are you going to suspect them to actually make a competent decision on this matter.

  10. #10
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    I would much rather have mine and 1000 other peoples credit card numbers be stolen (and they can all be canceled once we find bad charges on our cards) than be assualted, raped, involuntarily manslaughtered, and various other bad things. So why do people using COMPUTERS to steal CC's get more of a sentence than the people who commit those crimes, and why do people who steal CC not using computers get lesser sentences?
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