Dual booting Free BSD and Slackware Linux.
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  1. #1
    AO BOFH: Luser Abuser BModeratorFH gore's Avatar
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    Dual booting Free BSD and Slackware Linux.

    Dual booting Free BSD and Slackware Linux.







    Installing OSs with gore series:







    Written by gore in Vim.










    Introduction:









    This is a tutorial to kind of help people who are using Linux or Free BSD use the other.... And the other way around.



    Just recently I did this for my very first time, and so I decided after the third time I had it down rather well and so I'm going too write this and that way others can do this too.


    Free BSD and Slackware are very closely related OSs. Slackware is the most UNIX like of all Linux and Free BSD is well... BSD. And they both use .tgz and they are more related in that well, on the Slackware home page they say Slackware belongs to Patric and BSDi.



    Anyway, to begin, first, go get my other tutorials. Get the one for installing Slackware Linux, and the one for installing Free BSD, as I really don't plan on re-writing the whole thing twice. And that will help keep the overall size of this one from being huge.













    Getting Started:





    Get the ISO files for Free BSD 5.3, which is what I'll be using for this, or just use whatever version of free BSD you have. The installation is pretty much the same for all of them, except 5.3 has a new boot screen which looks awesome. The ASCII Daemon rocks hardcore.


    If you aren't using a 5.X version don't worry, just read on anyway, the only difference is you won't see the first boot up screen.


    I'm going to install Free BSD first because well, that's how I feel like doing it.



    I am also going to use the Free BSD boot loader to keep this simple. So you won't need to edit LILO.











    Assumptions:




    You want your hand held like a little baby

    You have a sense of humor

    You will give me all your money

    You want Slackware Linux and free BSD on the same machine







    To get started, grab the first CD for Free BSD and pop it in your CD-ROM drive. If you're really good like me you can even do this while the machine is booting..... But that's because I install a new OS almost daily.




    When the computer boots, two things can happen:


    You've screwed up the ISO and don't see anything but whatever OS you have on the machine already


    You see a really awesome BSD Daemon in ASCII






    If the latter is true, keep reading.











    You may want to hit the space bar so the timer quits counting down. Or if you don't care what the screen says, just press 1 so it starts booting Free BSD.



    The text flis around on the screen like a really poor quality IRC channel.


    When it comes time that you see the pretty looking screen, Press the DOWN arrow key ONE time, so this way you see "Standard" highlighted, and press ENTER.


    After you have pressed ENTER, do it again on the screen you come too.


    Now some people may see something about a drive geometry being wrong, some won't, if you do press ENTER.




    After pressing ENTER again, or at ;east when you're at the screen showing your partitions, this is where the tutorials I wrote become different.

    See you're not going to make ONE partition, this screen is going to make it a little different, but don't worry! Your fearless leader of OS installs is here.

    first off, press the up and down arrow keys. See how it moves stuff on the screen?

    Well, select each partition you may have on this disk, and press the D key on your keyboard and delete the partitions until you have one big unused space, and then, I'll show you how to create slices.

    When you have everything deleted, and it's just one partition, press C.

    Now, depending on how much disk space you have, this will be up to you.

    I have 120 GBs of disk, so I'm going to make my Partitions one way, and you can make your's however you want.

    Now the first I'm going to make is going to be about 30 GB.


    This is going to be the partition Free BSD will use by itself.

    So I type 30000M

    I type it into that little mini pop up that came up when you press C.

    If you for example want to make a 10 GB or so partition, you would type into that little pop up this:


    10000M


    Then press Enter.


    A little window pops up and since this is for the Free BSD partition, just press Enter.


    Now, you need to highlight the Free BSD partition you just made, and press S on the keyboard to make it bootable.


    After you have done that, LEAVE THE OTHER PARTITION ALONE FOR NOW.



    Press Q so save the things and quit.

    Now, the next screen you see is for the Free BSD boot loader. Here, you need to just press Enter as you are going to use the Free BSD boot loader, which is pre-selected.


    You press Enter and then see a new screen saying how you now get to play with Partitions again.

    Remember the one you just made? Well now you're going to use it.

    This part is very simple.

    Press Enter and you'll see the black Fdisk window.


    Now I know this is going to seem VERY simple, because, well, it is.

    Press A on your keyboard.


    Now press Q

    Now grab my Free BSD installation tutorial because all you have to do now is pick pacjages to install, and that's it.



    Free BSD installs, and THEN, after a while, I'll show you how to get Slackware on now. This really isn't hard at all.



    After Free BSD is done installing, you can go ahead and boot up for the first time if you want to make sure it installed properly.

    After it boots up just log in as root and type reboot after you've popped in the Slackware installation disk.












    Slackware installation:



    Grab my tutorial for installing Slackware, as you can use that except for the partitions part.






    When the machine reboots, Slackware should start up without a problem, and then you can grab my Slackware tutorial, then when it comes time for typing cfdisk, you'll see that there is a Free BSD partition, and whatever free space you left with it from Free BSD.





    Use the up and down arrow keys to highlight the partition saying "Free Space" and then using the arrow keys again, make sure you have "new" highlighted by pressing the RIGHT Arrow key once, and hitting Enter.


    This partition is going to be the Slackware Linux Swap space.


    When you hit Enter, and you see "Primary" "Logical" "Cancel" just hit Enter and it default selects Primary.


    After you press Enter, it asks you for the size in MBs you want the new partition, and I'm telling it 1024 MBs.

    Press Enter after you have entered how large you want it to be.


    When you press Enter, press it again because you want this towards the begining.




    Now just press the down arrow key, to highlight the other remaining free space. You have to press the right arrow key again, which then highlights the "New" option, and hit Enter.

    Again just hit the Enter key for another Primary partition. This is going to be the main Slackware partition, so it should probably take up the rest of the space unless you're setting up a server and want to make another for /var, but for what you're probably doing if you're reading this, it will be fine to just press Enter and let it take the rest of the space up on the HD.

    Press Enter again after you press Enter to tell it how much space when you get back to the Fdisk screen to set this as bootable, and then hit the right arrow key until you have "type" selected, and then Enter Again, and then type 83 for "Linux".

    Now press the up arrow key to highlight the first partition made in Slackware, then press the right arrow key until you have "type" highlighted again, and press Enter, then Enter again, then Enter again because type 82 is selected by default, which is Linux Swap.

    Then press the right arrow key until you have "Write" highlighted and press Enter. Then type yes to tell it to right to the disk. It probably will beep at yuo while it does this, don't worry, it's normal. When you have all this done, press the right arrow key until you have quit highlighted, and press Enter.



    ALL you have to remember now, is that when you go to install LILO, TELL IT TO INSTALL IT ON THE ROOT PARTITION, NOT THE MBR BECAUSE THAT WILL OVERWRITE THE FREE BSD BOOT LOADER AND YOU DON'T WANT THAT TO HAPPEN.


    Just remember, when you get to where you need to put lilo, Don't put it on the MBR and don't put it on floppy, the only other option left is the safe one.

    After you get done with my Slackware install tutorial, and Slackware is done installing, YOU'RE DONE!! Enjoy .
    Kill the lights, let the candles burn behind the pumpkins’ mischievous grins, and let the skeletons dance. For one thing is certain, The Misfits have returned and once again everyday is Halloween.The Misfits FreeBSD
    Cannibal Holocaust
    SuSE Linux
    Slackware Linux

  2. #2
    Blast From the Past
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    darn i cant give you points bro....but im make sure some fly your way eventualy
    i need to learn Vim...it dificult?
    work it harder, make it better, do it faster, makes us stronger

  3. #3
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    Vim compared to Word is like comparing a 1930's "car" to a brand-new Audi or something...
    I can tell Gore didn't use Word because his formatting, grammar, spelling and basic typography suck. It's called "wanting to be hard-core, but not realizing that being hard-core doesn't always yield the best results". He might have saved 10k on drive space, though...

    Gore: there's nothing wrong with your tutorials BUT HOW HARD IS IT TO USE BOLD AND ITALICS!!!??!!!! Or at least some basic formatting that doesn't just use 15 hard enters to differentiate between headers and text... probably takes 400Megabytes iand 5,000 lines of code in VIM to boldface something...

    Using VIM to type out a tutorial is like having to go to down to your basement every 5 minutes to drive your stationary bike that powers a dynamo ... then run upstairs to type for 4 minutes, then use your extra minute to run down and start biking again... pfffttttt

    I bet Gore typed it out in Word but just doesn't know how to use it

  4. #4
    AO French Antique News Whore
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    Gore, I have to stand with Neg here. Your formatting so bad that I don't feel reading the tutorial.
    -Simon \"SDK\"

  5. #5
    gore, your heart is in the right place...

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Dual booting Free BSD and Slackware Linux.
    Installing OSs with gore series:
    Written by gore in Vim.
    Alternative format by Soda_Popinsky

    Introduction:
    This is a tutorial to kind of help people who are using Linux or Free BSD use the other.... And the other way around.

    Just recently I did this for my very first time, and so I decided after the third time I had it down rather well and so I'm going too write this and that way others can do this too.

    Free BSD and Slackware are very closely related OSs. Slackware is the most UNIX like of all Linux and Free BSD is well... BSD. And they both use .tgz and they are more related in that well, on the Slackware home page they say Slackware belongs to Patric and BSDi.

    Anyway, to begin, first, go get my other tutorials. Get the one for installing Slackware Linux, and the one for installing Free BSD, as I really don't plan on re-writing the whole thing twice. And that will help keep the overall size of this one from being huge.

    Getting Started:
    Get the ISO files for Free BSD 5.3, which is what I'll be using for this, or just use whatever version of free BSD you have. The installation is pretty much the same for all of them, except 5.3 has a new boot screen which looks awesome. The ASCII Daemon rocks hardcore.

    If you aren't using a 5.X version don't worry, just read on anyway, the only difference is you won't see the first boot up screen.I'm going to install Free BSD first because well, that's how I feel like doing it.I am also going to use the Free BSD boot loader to keep this simple. So you won't need to edit LILO.

    Assumptions:
    • You want your hand held like a little baby
    • You have a sense of humor
    • You will give me all your money
    • You want Slackware Linux and free BSD on the same machine

    To get started, grab the first CD for Free BSD and pop it in your CD-ROM drive. If you're really good like me you can even do this while the machine is booting..... But that's because I install a new OS almost daily. When the computer boots, two things can happen:
    • You've screwed up the ISO and don't see anything but whatever OS you have on the machine already
    • You see a really awesome BSD Daemon in ASCII


    If the latter is true, keep reading.

    You may want to hit the space bar so the timer quits counting down. Or if you don't care what the screen says, just press 1 so it starts booting Free BSD.The text flis around on the screen like a really poor quality IRC channel. When it comes time that you see the pretty looking screen, Press the DOWN arrow key ONE time, so this way you see "Standard" highlighted, and press ENTER. After you have pressed ENTER, do it again on the screen you come too. Now some people may see something about a drive geometry being wrong, some won't, if you do press ENTER. After pressing ENTER again, or at ;east when you're at the screen showing your partitions, this is where the tutorials I wrote become different.

    See you're not going to make ONE partition, this screen is going to make it a little different, but don't worry! Your fearless leader of OS installs is here.

    First off, press the up and down arrow keys. See how it moves stuff on the screen? Well, select each partition you may have on this disk, and press the D key on your keyboard and delete the partitions until you have one big unused space, and then, I'll show you how to create slices. When you have everything deleted, and it's just one partition, press C.

    Now, depending on how much disk space you have, this will be up to you.

    I have 120 GBs of disk, so I'm going to make my Partitions one way, and you can make your's however you want. Now the first I'm going to make is going to be about 30 GB.This is going to be the partition Free BSD will use by itself.

    So I type 30000M, I type it into that little mini pop up that came up when you press C. If you for example want to make a 10 GB or so partition, you would type into that little pop up this:

    10000M
    Then press Enter.

    A little window pops up and since this is for the Free BSD partition, just press Enter. Now, you need to highlight the Free BSD partition you just made, and press S on the keyboard to make it bootable. After you have done that, LEAVE THE OTHER PARTITION ALONE FOR NOW. Press Q so save the things and quit.

    Now, the next screen you see is for the Free BSD boot loader. Here, you need to just press Enter as you are going to use the Free BSD boot loader, which is pre-selected. You press Enter and then see a new screen saying how you now get to play with Partitions again. Remember the one you just made? Well now you're going to use it. This part is very simple.

    Press Enter and you'll see the black Fdisk window. Now I know this is going to seem VERY simple, because, well, it is. Press A on your keyboard. Now press Q. Now grab my Free BSD installation tutorial because all you have to do now is pick pacjages to install, and that's it.

    Free BSD installs, and THEN, after a while, I'll show you how to get Slackware on now. This really isn't hard at all. After Free BSD is done installing, you can go ahead and boot up for the first time if you want to make sure it installed properly. After it boots up just log in as root and type reboot after you've popped in the Slackware installation disk.

    Slackware installation:

    Grab my tutorial for installing Slackware, as you can use that except for the partitions part.

    When the machine reboots, Slackware should start up without a problem, and then you can grab my Slackware tutorial, then when it comes time for typing cfdisk, you'll see that there is a Free BSD partition, and whatever free space you left with it from Free BSD.

    Use the up and down arrow keys to highlight the partition saying "Free Space" and then using the arrow keys again, make sure you have "new" highlighted by pressing the RIGHT Arrow key once, and hitting Enter.

    This partition is going to be the Slackware Linux Swap space. When you hit Enter, and you see "Primary" "Logical" "Cancel" just hit Enter and it default selects Primary. After you press Enter, it asks you for the size in MBs you want the new partition, and I'm telling it 1024 MBs.

    Press Enter after you have entered how large you want it to be. When you press Enter, press it again because you want this towards the begining. Now just press the down arrow key, to highlight the other remaining free space. You have to press the right arrow key again, which then highlights the "New" option, and hit Enter.Again just hit the Enter key for another Primary partition. This is going to be the main Slackware partition, so it should probably take up the rest of the space unless you're setting up a server and want to make another for /var, but for what you're probably doing if you're reading this, it will be fine to just press Enter and let it take the rest of the space up on the HD.

    Press Enter again after you press Enter to tell it how much space when you get back to the Fdisk screen to set this as bootable, and then hit the right arrow key until you have "type" selected, and then Enter Again, and then type 83 for "Linux".Now press the up arrow key to highlight the first partition made in Slackware, then press the right arrow key until you have "type" highlighted again, and press Enter, then Enter again, then Enter again because type 82 is selected by default, which is Linux Swap.

    Then press the right arrow key until you have "Write" highlighted and press Enter. Then type yes to tell it to right to the disk. It probably will beep at yuo while it does this, don't worry, it's normal. When you have all this done, press the right arrow key until you have quit highlighted, and press Enter.

    ALL you have to remember now, is that when you go to install LILO, TELL IT TO INSTALL IT ON THE ROOT PARTITION, NOT THE MBR BECAUSE THAT WILL OVERWRITE THE FREE BSD BOOT LOADER AND YOU DON'T WANT THAT TO HAPPEN. Just remember, when you get to where you need to put lilo, Don't put it on the MBR and don't put it on floppy, the only other option left is the safe one.

    After you get done with my Slackware install tutorial, and Slackware is done installing, YOU'RE DONE!! Enjoy .

  6. #6
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    Originally posted here by SDK
    Gore, I have to stand with Neg here. Your formatting so bad that I don't feel reading the tutorial.
    What's the big deal? I see benefits to spreading it out, because when a n00by goes to print this out, it’s not going to be cluster-**** of info that's hard to read. Which is the last thing you need when you're installing for over 30 min. This way the n00b's can check off what steps they have done. Hell, PDF's are spaced 2 times more than this. Do you bitch and whine over them?

    If you're having problems, change your video cards and change your resolution from 800 X 600 to something better.

  7. #7
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    vi and vim are great. i'm all for them. but i mainly only use them for editing config files and scripting. sometimes for writing a bit of code. especially if i'm on a **** box with no resources. and i know gore is not using a p1, 4MB ram box to write up the tutorials. perhaps gore does have such a box, but like, why bother write it up there when you can write it up on your ``main'' box? answer; so you can tell people you wrote the tutorial on ENIAC, by candle light, using cards you punched using your own teeth! the tutorial seems a little pretentious. but isn't the real bofh is blatently pretentious? yes he is, and he says so on his website. gore obviously emulates this behaviour, so of course the tutorial (and i assume others) are similar in this respect.

    anyway, vim; in general, when i write up documentation etc, it would have to be done with OpenOffice Writer, to get the nice formatting and stuff. the only reason i use this software is because everyone else uses software like it (Word). that's just ``how it's done'', or so it would seem. remember not everyone can afford Word whereas everyone should be able to afford Writer.

    if you were concerned with space and still wanted the formatting, you could always use a markup language maybe? like, HTML. rumour has it that you can get great basic formatting this way.

    Hell, PDF's are spaced 2 times more than this. Do you bitch and whine over them?
    If you're having problems, change your video cards and change your resolution from 800 X 600 to something better.
    PDF's are spaced according to who created the PDF, and the reader and zoom. 800x600 is a great resolution! i can see your proposed idea to the spacing problem being potentially, extremely expensive for some people. not the best really.
    Hmm...theres something a little peculiar here. Oh i see what it is! the sentence is talking about itself! do you see that? what do you mean? sentences can\'t talk! No, but they REFER to things, and this one refers directly-unambigeously-unmistakably-to the very sentence which it is!

  8. #8
    Blast From the Past
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    i stand with gore on the anti-word thought....sometimes you want to kill that Paper Clip GTA3 style...
    but Vi and Vim are just plain old school...yes i like old school...but i also like my GUI...it makes things a hell of alot easier.

    just a matter of point of view i guess
    work it harder, make it better, do it faster, makes us stronger

  9. #9
    AO BOFH: Luser Abuser BModeratorFH gore's Avatar
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    Kvim and Gvim are GUI enough. If you don't like it you could always use an Analog recording device (Pencil)

    I'm working on an installation of Vector Linux right now. Never installed it before and I must say, it's what would happen if you took Slackware Linux, Free BSD and Debian, and Libranet and tossed the installers all together. Very odd, but so far I'm almost done without a manual. I think I'll wrote a tutorial for it in a minute, it is my first time installing it though
    Kill the lights, let the candles burn behind the pumpkins’ mischievous grins, and let the skeletons dance. For one thing is certain, The Misfits have returned and once again everyday is Halloween.The Misfits FreeBSD
    Cannibal Holocaust
    SuSE Linux
    Slackware Linux

  10. #10
    AO übergeek phishphreek's Avatar
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    I wish I had learned vi or vim... I normally use emacs or joe when editing on CLI... so much easier... I don't have to bang on the keyboard to get out of the editor... when I'm using vi or vim... the only way I can figure out how to get out of it is to press the power button on the PC... let alone save anything... well.. I can kill the process... but thats not the point... but hey... thats my fault I never learned it.

    /ramble
    Quitmzilla is a firefox extension that gives you stats on how long you have quit smoking, how much money you\'ve saved, how much you haven\'t smoked and recent milestones. Very helpful for people who quit smoking and used to smoke at their computers... Helps out with the urges.

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