Getting Linux, a few questions I'm sure someone could answer.
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Thread: Getting Linux, a few questions I'm sure someone could answer.

  1. #1
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    Getting Linux, a few questions I'm sure someone could answer.

    Hey everyone, how's things goin? It's goin ok for me, been better. A plus is that I just got a new laptop and I'm gonna get Linux on it. I'll download one of the distros out there ofcourse. I wanted to know what was a good distro for the Linux beginner, but also provides a stable work environment. I researched and I found three that really caught my eye. They were Slackware, Mandrake, and easyLinux.... but I really cant say what's good or better, or what's advantageous of the group.I have no idea. Any information aimed towards beginner based and or easy to use Linux distros please post! Also, I wanted to know if a dual boot is possible with this new pc. I've already installed things and I dont want to loose what I've saved on my laptop. I think what I really wanna know is would I be able to set up Linux with dual boot without having to repartition this hard drive.
    \"I\'m a lonely soldier, at war... Sent away to die... never quite knowing why.... Sometimes it makes no sense at all....\"

  2. #2
    My thoughts and recommendations are going to lean you towards slackware, and here is why:

    1. IF you go redhat or fedora, the distro people recommend all too often to newbies, you never really learn anything. The entire Operating System holds your hand so much that you leave the OS only knowing that you now hate the RPM packaging system. It's a good OS, but trust me, you won't gain much from it.

    2. Mandrake is a solid OS, and this would be my second choice for people new to Linux. However, it too holds your hand almost too much to learn things.

    3. Slackware has got to be -the- cleanest Linux system. It's hard to explain what I mean by that. For instance, let's say you are looking to purchase a car. Now, you need a car with all the basic features, right? With Linux distros, you run the risk of the steering wheel being on the right side of the car... maybe the trunk in the front of the car and the engine in the back, and possibly the gastank on the side of the car instead of underneath.

    The point is, too many distributions have folders/files/ways to configure/ that just don't make sense nor stick to origonal Operating System standards. This can make it confusing for beginners as well as seasoned users.

    I've used slackware for a very very long time now, and it still remains my favorite Linux OS. It's going to have tools to help you install/configure and the like, but still show you how (and THAT'S IMPORTANT) to do the same things manually. This way you get an OS you can still use, but also learn how to use.

    Stable. Solid. Fast. And most importantly... KISS method. Keep it Simple Stupid is the motto that slackware users live by - common sense, basically.

    "Ask a slackware user a question, get 3 answers on how to accomplish the same thing different ways."

  3. #3
    AO's Mr Grumpy
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    Re: Getting Linux, a few questions I'm sure someone could answer.

    Originally posted here by C.Battery
    Hey everyone, how's things goin? It's goin ok for me, been better. A plus is that I just got a new laptop and I'm gonna get Linux on it. I'll download one of the distros out there ofcourse. I wanted to know what was a good distro for the Linux beginner, but also provides a stable work environment. I researched and I found three that really caught my eye. They were Slackware, Mandrake, and easyLinux.... but I really cant say what's good or better, or what's advantageous of the group.I have no idea. Any information aimed towards beginner based and or easy to use Linux distros please post! Also, I wanted to know if a dual boot is possible with this new pc. I've already installed things and I dont want to loose what I've saved on my laptop. I think what I really wanna know is would I be able to set up Linux with dual boot without having to repartition this hard drive.
    I don't know what kind of response you'll get , but for a quick fix suggest you PM gore. He can usually solve *nix problems, regardless of distro
    Computer says no
    (Carol Beer)

  4. #4
    Why don't you try some bootable disto's first and get to know your way around before installing one...

    i don't know every bootable distro but i've used

    Helix
    PHLAK
    and Knoppix
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  5. #5
    copy, because that won't do much for anyone, to be honest.

    You can't install programs. You can't modify configuration files. You may or may not have a good hardware detection on the CD, and if you don't that can be a huge turn off. It's going to run slower than normal because it's in RAM and not RAM+Hard drive.

    They won't be learning Linux. They will be learning an interface.

  6. #6
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    Granted that it'll run slower, try VMWare and do an install of whatever you want. It's a good way to learn and you have an open playground to do pretty much whatever you would do on a regular boot of whatever plus you have virtual hardware which is supported by pretty much everything.

  7. #7
    Slackware doesn't work with VMware, along with quite a few other distros.

    You can always workaround (some) of that by using a VMware meant kernel... but that destroys a lot of capability Linux has. Not to mention, slackware and distros still won't install.

  8. #8
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    Originally posted here by ;TT
    Granted that it'll run slower, try VMWare and do an install of whatever you want. It's a good way to learn and you have an open playground to do pretty much whatever you would do on a regular boot of whatever plus you have virtual hardware which is supported by pretty much everything.

    I dont think I quite understand you. Are you saying install VMWare, and then use a cd version of Linux like Knoppix? Hmmm... not too sure what VMWare actually is.
    \"I\'m a lonely soldier, at war... Sent away to die... never quite knowing why.... Sometimes it makes no sense at all....\"

  9. #9
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    I've installed Slackware on VMWare before and I'll do it tonight again if you so please... you use the scsi.s kernel which is no work-around... it comes standard with Slackware 10.


    VMWare creates a virtual computer on your computer, you actually install the distro/whatever onto your computer. Google it and you'll get more specifics.

  10. #10
    AO's Mr Grumpy
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    Originally posted here by ;TT
    Granted that it'll run slower, try VMWare and do an install of whatever you want. It's a good way to learn and you have an open playground to do pretty much whatever you would do on a regular boot of whatever plus you have virtual hardware which is supported by pretty much everything.
    That is assuming you have the necessary requirements to run VMware or Microsoft(Connectix) Virtual Machine software in the first place. Running both at present, Servers, and Linux workstations, speed is well down the list of features
    Computer says no
    (Carol Beer)

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