Choosing an OS
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Thread: Choosing an OS

  1. #1
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    Choosing an OS

    Ive grown up with Windows, Currently have XP at the moment. I mean most average users use it. What i want to know is, if i want to get into computers, all aspects of them, would it be to my benefit to switch to Linux? Or should i stay with what i know?

  2. #2
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    More than the average user uses XP and don't switch one for the other! Why not dual boot a Linux flavor and XP? You get the best of both worlds that way.

    cheers
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  3. #3
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    I agree, dual boot a box. everyone has there preference, and just about every OS has its advantages and disadvantages. It also depends on the job you want. But I would definetly atleast learn the basics (and a little more) of all types of major OSs ...(*nix, Mac OS, Windows)

    *waits for "religious wars" to start about the best OS*
    Everyone is going to die, I am just as good of a reason as any.

    http://think-smarter.blogspot.com

  4. #4
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    looking

    Yeah, ive been looking into linux. I thought it would be a cool learning experiance to play with it. So i guess duel booting would be a good idea, as long as i dont mess it up. I did see a tutorial on how to do it though, so i have no questions there. But one question comes to mind. Ive noticed there are quite a few types of Linux version? I saw Mandrake, Suse, Red hat, and a few others. Is there a big difference between the two, or should i just take a pick?

  5. #5
    AO Veteran NeuTron's Avatar
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    Of the few options you listed, I would have to recommend giving SuSE a try. Not only is it one of the best options for linux beginners, it is also the best (IMO) at auto partitioning your drive durring the install process to preserve your windows volume. I have noticed though that it requires a pretty beefy computer to run quickly. Good luck, and Im sure you'll be fine with any distro you choose.
    -NeuTron

  6. #6
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    I have heard some reallly good things about SUSE, but have not been able to try it yet. I have tryed versions of mandrake, and they were ok, also tryed redhat a tad and it was good too. but if what Gore says about SUSE is true then id o with that. Im sure he will stick his head in and Tell you exactly why.
    Everyone is going to die, I am just as good of a reason as any.

    http://think-smarter.blogspot.com

  7. #7
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    heh

    heh, well, the more information the better. And thanks for all your input.

  8. #8
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    Certainly dual boot with Linux, BSD, or another open source OS. If you have a resource you can go to for help easily, I'd try Slackware linux. It makes you do more of the work, doesn't spoon feed you as much (that way you learn more.)

    I'm working on a tutorial for DualBooting XP/Linux using the NTLDR/Windows boot manager, but I'm nowhere near done. If you're interested I'll post the 'steps for the impatient' here.
    "Data is not necessarily information. Information does not necessarily lead to knowledge. And knowledge is not always sufficient to discover truth and breed wisdom." --Spaf
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  9. #9
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    If you're gonna give Linux a go, I'd suggest SuSE as a first time distro. That's what I started with and I learned a lot from the experience. While I've moved on to Gentoo, I wouldn't recomend that for someone with no Linux experience. While Gentoo's not that different once it's installed, it's installation can be a problem for those unfamilliar with Linux. SuSE is, in my opinion, a good choice for a first time Linux install and, given time, will get you familiar and comfortable with Linux systems in general.

  10. #10
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    Hi

    It depends on what you want to learn (eg. how to install an OS on
    one hand, or how to access a box with that and that OS remotely
    on the other), but it might also be worth to try another path besides
    multi-boot machines: the one of virtual machines.


    Basically, you can run several computers having several OSs
    on one machine - and play around with them. All at the same time.
    People often use vmware[1] and virtualPC[2] (virtualServer[3] for
    enterprises). The list of "supported" OS[4] quickens the appetite
    In a long-term view, the money might pay off.

    "Advantages": You can switch from one OS to the other in a heartbeat.
    In addition, you can create "ghost-images" by copying a file (essentially).

    Cheers


    [1] http://www.vmware.com/download/
    [2] http://www.microsoft.com/windows/virtualpc/default.mspx
    [3] http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserv...r/default.mspx
    [4] http://vpc.visualwin.com/
    If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.
    (Abraham Maslow, Psychologist, 1908-70)

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