Why is Windows more popular then Linux
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  1. #1
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    Post Why is Windows more popular then Linux

    My experience of using Linux was and still is a frustrating one. I'm afraid that I can't give it up, as it is going to be a part of my future work. But I think there a few reasons, why Linux is not getting very popular. I saw a lot of opinions on this subject. Defending Windows or Linux alike. I don't want to be doing any of that. There is why I think Linux is loosing out.

    1) Linux is far from the simple system to learn to use. I found that often, to do the simplest thing, one has to know a lot of advanced topics. Most of the general users don't want to have to spend hours of studying,just to install any other program they need.

    2) There is not much official support from the hardware vendors for Linux. And as nice as the theory of Linux supporting tons of hardware, we all know this is just a prety dream, there is enough of not supported hardware out there. Let's be honest, most of the common users will not go out to buy new hardware just to use an OS.

    3) One will say that they can get many drivers online. I am afraid it's not quite like this. Many people won't know where to start looking. Also, not all of users will have an unlimited access to the internet. And again, usual users will not want and often won't have time to go through all this.

    4) And I'm afraid that the Linux comunity is far from friendly. An unfortunate fact. As much as there are people willing to help, often they can't. They also automaticaly asume that they are speaking to technicaly aware people. This means that for a usual user their answer is just a whole pile of giberish. And we shall not forget a whole pile of "wiz kids" that hang around and trying to be smart.

    5) One will say that there are a lot of tutorials, yet again they were intended fot technicaly proficient people. And again, we are at the same point, any general user will want the OS to do the job in an easiest way possible.

    6) One more factor is that there isn't as much software support for Linux. And yes, there are some opensource programs, but they are not always suitable for the job, and they can be accuired only from the net. Again, not everyone has an unlimited access to the web.

    I know that there are a lot of Linux users here. I also know exactly what some of them will say. I don't even have to point them out .

    So: "Come out, come out" and give us your opinion . We'll be glad to hear it.
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    you are right about alot of the above. But windows is also more popular becasue Microsoft has done a damn good job of shoving it in peoples faces. It is what just aboout everyone is used to, a lot of people dont like change. This is why Windows is more popular then Macs also (aside from the price difference). MS is great at marketing their product, and even better at getting rid of competitors (both ethicly and non-ethicly). If MS wasnt the product so many people were used to then the work you put into linux wouldnt seem like so much.

    just my $.02
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    Right...right...and...right !

    But aside from marketing etc...the main reason why more people choose Windows is because, like myself, they started out with nothing and wanted the easiest system to work with...

    as the schools at the primary and secondary levels become more involved with computers ( which, at most schools, this has only happened in the last few years ) you will find more and more people, having been raised on computers, looking for more advanced systems...

    in twenty years when everyone has been exposed to computers at an early age and throughout their school life...I think you will see a decline in those seeking Windows and more people looking for the more advanced systems.

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    nightcat: I have to agree with you on some of your points.

    Learning linux was difficult in the beginning. But, as I've stayed up studying and learning the OS, it has become easier and easier. You're just using a different platform. Of course its going to be different. One of the biggest gripes I have is installing software. Try to install a peice of software just to end up downloading a dozen conflicting dependancies...

    Hardware... I have no complaints here. I've found linux to support all the hardware that I've tried to load it on. I've even gotten tv tuner cards and web cams that were no long supported by the manufacturers to work.

    Drivers... same as hardware. I've found everything I've needed. (sometimes with some intensive searching)

    As far as support... You don't get much better support for Windows either. I'm a technical user... I can't interpret the "english" that "Habib" at Dell in India is speaking.

    Ever try calling your ISP with a problem. They ask you the OS... if you tell them linux, they'll try go get off the phone as quick as possible. Even if you aren't using the linux box to connect. I called with a dsl problem that had to do with my router not authenticating. They asked me what I was running and I told them a Cisco router. They wanted to know my computer OS... which doesn't matter. "We don't support linux". No duh! I want support on why my username and password isn't authenticating using my router... not my desktop.

    The linux community has been pretty friendly. Granted, they are quick to flame... but they will help. Look into a LUG around your area. The university by me has a nice mailing list and meets every Tuesday. They have some very interesting presentations and discussions. I've never had a problem that they couldn't help me with. Like you indicated... the responses were technical.

    IMO- Linux and Unix are technical operating systems. They were not make for grandma.
    There are some distros that have tried to make things easier... Lindows (or whatever its called now). They sell them at Wallmart. I spoke quickly with a sales person at Wallmart a while back... he was surprised at how many of them they sell... I didn't get any numbers.

    For software... I've found everything that I've needed and eventually gotten it to work. But, I really only use linux for servers or security tools... not so much my everyday stuff.

    I tried to switch over... but school and work require me to use windows. I can get some of the software to work on linux, but some just won't. Plus, I like video games. gaming on linux really sucks. I don't have the patience when it comes to games. I use games to relax... the last thing I want to do is spend 4 hours trying to get a game to work. I still keep linux on servers, and my everyday workstations/laptop dual booted. I even have linux loaded up in virtual PC, or load the knoppix ISO in virtual PC when I need *quick* access.

    Windows really is easier to use. If I wasn't a technical user... then I wouldn't even try using Linux. Its not a Desktop OS, IMO.
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    Re: Why is Windows more popular then Linux

    Originally posted here by nightcat
    My experience of using Linux was and still is a frustrating one. I'm afraid that I can't give it up, as it is going to be a part of my future work. But I think there a few reasons, why Linux is not getting very popular.


    The desktop market is the only place Linux isn't getting popular. A HUGE part of the Net runs Linux and UNIX based systems and almost every web site in the World runs on Apache.



    I saw a lot of opinions on this subject. Defending Windows or Linux alike. I don't want to be doing any of that. There is why I think Linux is loosing out.
    While I understand your point, the main reason I for one stand up is because very few people ever take the time to learn how to use the Os they have. Windows can be made stable, I've done it, and Pooh has mastered it. However in my view, Windows is NOT more stable than a UNIX based OS, and there are reasons for it. On the desktop, Linux and BSD give home users a chance to do things they just can't do with "Soho" OSs, like setting up servers without a GUI. The GUI only gets in the way.

    1) Linux is far from the simple system to learn to use. I found that often, to do the simplest thing, one has to know a lot of advanced topics. Most of the general users don't want to have to spend hours of studying,just to install any other program they need.

    that would be mainly opinion. When I first installed Slackware I hadn't read a manual. The start up screen at the end said use CFDISK or Fdisk to set up partitions, I used CFDIsK and set them up and read the screen, I set the type and figured all of this out myself. After that, well, typing start did not work, but typing setup did. It made sense to me. I managed to install it without reading a manual. I did the same for Free BSD and now I've written docs for both.

    Installing software on Linux can be a breeze or a pain. Dependency Hell exists but for the most part that isn't as much of a problem like it was 2 years ago when I first started using it. I installed software last night for example.

    I wanted to delete the version of Xine I had on here and install the copy from the Xine web page. I opened YAST2 with a Mouse click, gave the root password, clicked on install / Remove software, clicked on Multimedia, clicked on Xine to delete it, and clicked accept.

    without a GUI I would be using the SpaceBar to do this and the arrow keys.

    After that I opened a terminal and CD into the directory I had the RPMs for it all in. rpm -U xine*

    rpm -U

    the Uppercase use is easy to remember, "Upgrade" "Uppercase" easy.

    After that I wanted to have the Windows 32 codecs to watch video for Windows.

    rpm -i w32*.rpm

    done

    This would have taken about 30 minutes for Windows and then needed a reboot. I still haven't rebooted and I used the codecs last night.

    2) There is not much official support from the hardware vendors for Linux. And as nice as the theory of Linux supporting tons of hardware, we all know this is just a prety dream, there is enough of not supported hardware out there. Let's be honest, most of the common users will not go out to buy new hardware just to use an OS.
    I have 3 desktops and a Laptop. All have Nvidia video cards except my Compaq which has a shitty integrated Video card, and all have Integrated sound cards the machine came with except this machine which has a Sound Blaster Live! card. All machines have sound and work fine even though they are integrated and all machines get #d graphics so I can play UT and all I had to do was download a driver and type

    sh NVIDIA*.sh

    except on SUSE Linux, YAST2 Downloads the driver for you.

    this is actually better than Windows, on Windows you need a CD to install it, or hope you can getonline to update it after you install the drivers for the NIC and reboot for them. In Linux, all NICs work without me having to touch them. I boot up and they are already ready to play and online. In Windows, I install, reboot a few times for drivers, reboot for Installation of other software, then hope I haven't been wormed by things that aren't even a threat on my other boxes.


    My Laptop is brand new from Dell. I got SUSE 8.2 Professional installed on it without a problem the first time I tried it. SUSE 8.2 is over a year old but I had everything working fine. I have 3D, sound, Network, everything.

    If I reformat and reinstall XP on that box though WOOOOO boy better find the drivers CD, because NOTHING is going to work.


    So anyway I'm wondering what hardware isn't going to work. I haven't found any yet.

    Don't name of Win Modems or Win Printers, those aren't hardware, they're plastic software modules. If you knew exactly how they worked, you'd be shocked they did at all and you can STILL USE THEM in Linux sometimes. Not bad considering they make the OS do the work and the driver..... Seriously read up on this, it's amazing what Hardware people do to save money.


    3) One will say that they can get many drivers online. I am afraid it's not quite like this. Many people won't know where to start looking. Also, not all of users will have an unlimited access to the internet. And again, usual users will not want and often won't have time to go through all this.
    I've never once needed to look online for drivers. I install, and all done. The only driver I download is the Nvidia one which can't be placed on Linux CDs for legal purposes.

    However I've spent quite a while online looking for a printer driver for Windows 2000. A printer which is like YEARS old, and Windows 2000 couldn't find it.

    4) And I'm afraid that the Linux comunity is far from friendly. An unfortunate fact. As much as there are people willing to help, often they can't. They also automaticaly asume that they are speaking to technicaly aware people. This means that for a usual user their answer is just a whole pile of giberish. And we shall not forget a whole pile of "wiz kids" that hang around and trying to be smart.
    A community helps because they want too. Call Microsoft and ask for free support. I bet you could understand what THEY said to you. It would be loud and clear.

    irc.freenode.net

    Go there. I've seen them spend hours helping someone new.



    5) One will say that there are a lot of tutorials, yet again they were intended fot technicaly proficient people. And again, we are at the same point, any general user will want the OS to do the job in an easiest way possible.

    READ MINE. If you can understand what an arrow key is, you can install an OS with what I have done. I made them for people like you mention, and I am going to bet you could install Free BSD and Slackware with what I wrote.

    Click on my profile, go in there, and click on "Other tutorials by this user" under my pic. After that, start reading.

    6) One more factor is that there isn't as much software support for Linux. And yes, there are some opensource programs, but they are not always suitable for the job, and they can be accuired only from the net. Again, not everyone has an unlimited access to the web.
    this may be a shocking secret but you can BUY Open Source software. I know this is hard to think of at first, but you to can use software like this without a net connection.

    For software itself and sheer volume..... Linux has you. There is more software vailable for Linux and BSd than any platform, you just have to look for it, it's not in stores.

    And that no support, well do you mean calling up and asking questions? Or there is no support like software vendors don't support it?

    Real Player 10 is now on Linux, with Wine most Windows programs are, and with WineX, you have Windows Games. Doom and UT all run under Linux, and don't get me started on Oracle.

    So: "Come out, come out" and give us your opinion . We'll be glad to hear it.
    All done.

  6. #6
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    Windows is more popular because it was here first. Back in the days of *gasp, dare I say it? I'll say it softly* command line os, there came a demand for graphic user interface. This demand became a huge cry and hewe when Apple released McIntosh, and the first Mac *was* fully GUI and *was* run by a mouse. PC users thought it was cool. Along comes Bill with his (now firmly imbedded and rapidly growing but still hungry corporation) Mouse programs for dos - remember, MSDos was the most widespread os at the time; everyone who built PC's or PC compatibles for the most part used it. Bill decided to take it a bit further and somewhere in the latter part of the 1980's (1985 or 6 I think?) Win 3.10 was released, starting on new systems (8087's) and slowly working its way through into 'off the shelf' sales as well. By the time he released 3.11 (about 2 years later) his was not only the most widely used OS in the industry (MSDos still) but also now the most widely used GUI. From there it was a matter of changing with the times, which MS has tried to do - and succeeded quite well according to their phat profit$. There were other GUI's around the time of Win 3.1, but none had the industry support or industry's trust like Bill. Now the windows we use today has about as much semblance to its ancestor as we do cro-magnon man, but there you have it, why Windows is as popular as it is today.

    I'm more curious along this line of thinking...

    Bill bought Dos from an old Unix progger who wrote it as a more portable version of Unix - all its commands are based from Unix, and the way it did business was as well. Why didn't Unix come with the first GUI? Somebody *had* to have dropped the ball on that one, else the powers that controlled Unix way back when just didn't have any sort of business savvy...
    Even a broken watch is correct twice a day.

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    Being able to set up a server without a GUI is an advantage how exactly? I fail to see why that "feature" would make an OS more stable... and there's a bunch of servers that can be installed on Windows without a GUI (MySQL comes to mind) - nobody does it, though, because it's retarded

    And if you need 30 minutes on Windows to remove a proggy and install some codecs, you've got problems, gore

  8. #8
    Senior Member gore's Avatar
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    Originally posted here by Negative
    Being able to set up a server without a GUI is an advantage how exactly? I fail to see why that "feature" would make an OS more stable... and there's a bunch of servers that can be installed on Windows without a GUI (MySQL comes to mine) - nobody does it, though, because it's retarded

    And if you need 30 minutes on Windows to remove a proggy and install some codecs, you've got problems, gore
    For one who cares how pretty something is when it's sitting in a telco closet sopmewhere without even a monitor attached to it?

    Next, GUI, wastes RAM. A Server should be using RAM for clients, not a stupid GUI.

    Two, GUI again, BSOD. Takes the whole system with it. In Linux, if the GUI crashes, it won't take the whole system with it.

    GUI may not make it less stable but it sure as hell could reduce chances of crashes taking the whole thing with it.

  9. #9
    Senior Member gore's Avatar
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    Originally posted here by |3lack|ce
    Bill bought Dos from an old Unix progger who wrote it as a more portable version of Unix - all its commands are based from Unix, and the way it did business was as well. Why didn't Unix come with the first GUI? Somebody *had* to have dropped the ball on that one, else the powers that controlled Unix way back when just didn't have any sort of business savvy...
    Actually they bought it from Tim Patterson? I believe that was his name and he worked for Seattle computer products. It wasn't UNIX per se, it was a rip off of CP/M. It was called Q-DOS (Quick Dirty OS).

  10. #10
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    Originally posted here by |3lack|ce
    Windows is more popular because it was here first. Back in the days of *gasp, dare I say it? I'll say it softly* command line os, there came a demand for graphic user interface. This demand became a huge cry and hewe when Apple released McIntosh, and the first Mac *was* fully GUI and *was* run by a mouse. PC users thought it was cool. Along comes Bill with his (now firmly imbedded and rapidly growing but still hungry corporation) Mouse programs for dos - remember, MSDos was the most widespread os at the time; everyone who built PC's or PC compatibles for the most part used it. Bill decided to take it a bit further and somewhere in the latter part of the 1980's (1985 or 6 I think?) Win 3.10 was released, starting on new systems (8087's) and slowly working its way through into 'off the shelf' sales as well. By the time he released 3.11 (about 2 years later) his was not only the most widely used OS in the industry (MSDos still) but also now the most widely used GUI. From there it was a matter of changing with the times, which MS has tried to do - and succeeded quite well according to their phat profit$. There were other GUI's around the time of Win 3.1, but none had the industry support or industry's trust like Bill. Now the windows we use today has about as much semblance to its ancestor as we do cro-magnon man, but there you have it, why Windows is as popular as it is today.
    Windows wasn't here first.... I think I mayb be mis-reading you, but umm, It wasn't the first. For command line OSs, a GUI already existed long before Mac. WIMP

    And you didn't mention Windows 1.0 or 2.

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