Telnet guest/password question
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Thread: Telnet guest/password question

  1. #1
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    Telnet guest/password question

    Experimenting with telnet. I've got a small lan and telnetted to a local system. A prompt for a login and password came up. Is there a default login and password on XP for telnet? I didn't put any passwords on so I don't understand.

  2. #2
    AO übergeek phishphreek's Avatar
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    They should use your windows usernames and passwords.

    You can just enter the username. If you set no password, then hit enter for the password.

    BTW: Why don't you have passwords? You should have them.

    BTW: Sending your username and password over telnet is not secure. They are sent in clear text. If anyone else on your LAN was sniffing your connection, they could get your UID and PWD. I doens't really matter much on a home network when you're the only user... but just thought you should be aware of it so you don't use it outside your LAN.
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  3. #3
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    I do have some passwords but I what I meant to say was I never set any for telnet. I tried what you said - just putting in a username and pressing enter at the password prompt. This is what I get:

    Logon failure: unknown user name or bad password.

  4. #4
    AO übergeek phishphreek's Avatar
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    You don't have to set passwords for telnet. AFAIK. You may have to add the user to the terminal services group... but I don't think you can do that with a workstation.

    I'm unsure...

    You have to enter the username and the password for the remote computer. Not the computer you are currently on.
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  5. #5
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    Yes. I know that much - that you don't have to put a password on your own box. The login/password prompt is what comes up when connecting to the other box. In this cases I have 2 boxes with XP in my own little network. No changes have been made as far as services are concerned. Telnet and Terminal Services are both up and running. I don't know what you mean by adding the machine I"m telnetting into to the terminal services group. I would just assume that I could simply telnet into the other box. That is the way I learned, is this not correct? I wonder why I need a password?????? Is it possible the other box has been comprimized by someone else and has set a password?

  6. #6
    AO übergeek phishphreek's Avatar
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    That is correct, you should just be able to put in the username and password.

    I say the terminal services group, because on a server, you have to add the user.

    I've never tried to set it up on a workstation. I use SSH instead.
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  7. #7
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    Originally posted here by phishphreek80
    It doesn't really matter much on a home network when you're the only user... but just thought you should be aware of it so you don't use it outside your LAN.
    While this is probably correct, I'm a fan of practice-what-you-preach. It's not that much effort to implement SSH in most cases. And why you would use Telnet for winXP is beyond me. It takes Spaff's comment's of internet encryption to a new level. It's third quote down; Spaff has a unique sense of humour, honed from years and years of usenet (ab)use.
    "Data is not necessarily information. Information does not necessarily lead to knowledge. And knowledge is not always sufficient to discover truth and breed wisdom." --Spaf
    Anyone who is capable of getting themselves made president should on no account be allowed to do the job. --Douglas Adams (1952-2001)
    "...people find it far easier to forgive others for being wrong than being right." - Albus Percival Wulfric Brian Dumbledore

  8. #8
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    Hi

    general

    On one hand, I encourage you to learn about the telnet "tool", since
    it gives you a simple mean to test for the pop/http protocol[1],
    on the other hand, as phish and zencoder said, I warn you to use telnet in
    general (plaintext passwords ). In particular, after playing with the telnet
    server, make sure to disable the service[2].

    telnet and tlntadmn.exe
    While tlntsvr.exe is the telnet server service, the configuration is done
    with tlntadmn.exe. I am puzzled that you cannot login in the remote
    machine (seems not to be a firewall issue, since you are prompted).

    Two ideas (You want to connect from A to B (192.168.1.10)):
    1) "telnet 192.168.1.10" by default connects with the current user - which
    might not be defined on box B.
    Code:
    > telnet -l B_user 192.168.1.10
    when prompted, enter the password of B_user who is defined on box B.

    2) on box B, configure your telnet server with tlntadmn.exe, for example
    Code:
    > tlntadmn.exe config sec =-NTLM+passwd
    and restart the service (needed?).

    By the way: You must have done some changes on the services, because
    they are set to manual/disabled on Windows XP Pro/SP2.

    a few quick notes
    It seems you have 2 running XP pro boxes. I would advise you to immediately
    a) disable the guest account
    b) rename the administrator account
    c) create a restricted user for daily use
    d) provide all accounts with passwords.

    Cheers

    [1] http://www.antionline.com/showthread...ght=index.html
    [2] http://www.theeldergeek.com/telnet.htm
    If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.
    (Abraham Maslow, Psychologist, 1908-70)

  9. #9
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    Thanks for the advice and links. I looked through some of the commands however I'm still having issues though. When I attempt on Microsoft Telnet to connect I don't even get prompted for a password anymore - I get the following:

    Access Denied: Specified user is not a member of TelnetClients group. Server Administrator must add the user to the above group.

    ?
    Also, XP SP2 has set the telnet service to default as disabled. All the services associated with telnet and telnet itself is running (On both XP boxes - neither are servers). What am I doing wrong?

  10. #10
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    sec_ware - how do you create a restricted user for daily use?

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