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Thread: Good Book for C++

  1. #11
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    If you are new to programming, I would suggest the Dummies' Guide to C++; but that is if you have absolutely no experience whatsoever with it.
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    My name is Draxx...you simians may refer to me merely as \'sir\' for a less syllable-intensive workout.

  2. #12
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    There's so much about C++, ANSI std. MFC and WIN32 api. Guess i will get Stroustrup book to start Thanks for all the advise given

  3. #13
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    People are starting to steer away from MFC and the Win 32 api. Everything is headed towards managed code nowadays via the .net framework. Most of it will carry over to managed C++.
    "When I get a little money I buy books; and if any is left I buy food and clothes." - Erasmus
    "There is no programming language, no matter how structured, that will prevent programmers from writing bad programs." - L. Flon
    "Mischief my ass, you are an unethical moron." - chsh
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  4. #14
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    Originally posted here by Juridian
    People are starting to steer away from MFC and the Win 32 api. Everything is headed towards managed code nowadays via the .net framework. Most of it will carry over to managed C++.
    This is what i found from Google

    What is managed code?

    Managed code is code that has its execution managed by the .NET Framework Common Language Runtime. It refers to a contract of cooperation between natively executing code and the runtime. This contract specifies that at any point of execution, the runtime may stop an executing CPU and retrieve information specific to the current CPU instruction address. Information that must be query-able generally pertains to runtime state, such as register or stack memory contents.

    http://blogs.msdn.com/brada/archive/.../09/48925.aspx
    Can you explain in layman terms what is managed code?

  5. #15
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    Managed code is code that has its execution managed by the .NET Framework Common Language Runtime.

    Think of it like the code that runs via the java runtime environment (it has some similarities).

    In .net, the languages such as c#, vb.net, managed c++, etc are compiled to an Intermediate Language (think assembly language, not java bytecode..) assembly (an assembly is an executable or dll). When you run the code it is just in time compiled as you need it to machine language for the processor you are using.

    Managed code has a greater degree of type safety, better security, and gives the ability for the code to be able to easily be extended or used by code built in other languages that are CLR compliant. So basically, I can use your C++ dll with my vb.net, c#, or whatever other application with minimal work.

    You can still write the older style of C++ with .net, but they are working on moving people away from it.

    I'd recommend picking up an account on http://safari.oreilly.com

    An excellent overview of .net is : Understanding .Net - A tutorial and analysis
    "When I get a little money I buy books; and if any is left I buy food and clothes." - Erasmus
    "There is no programming language, no matter how structured, that will prevent programmers from writing bad programs." - L. Flon
    "Mischief my ass, you are an unethical moron." - chsh
    Blog of X

  6. #16
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    Originally posted here by Juridian
    Managed code is code that has its execution managed by the .NET Framework Common Language Runtime.

    Think of it like the code that runs via the java runtime environment (it has some similarities).

    In .net, the languages such as c#, vb.net, managed c++, etc are compiled to an Intermediate Language (think assembly language, not java bytecode..) assembly (an assembly is an executable or dll). When you run the code it is just in time compiled as you need it to machine language for the processor you are using.

    Managed code has a greater degree of type safety, better security, and gives the ability for the code to be able to easily be extended or used by code built in other languages that are CLR compliant. So basically, I can use your C++ dll with my vb.net, c#, or whatever other application with minimal work.

    You can still write the older style of C++ with .net, but they are working on moving people away from it.

    I'd recommend picking up an account on http://safari.oreilly.com

    An excellent overview of .net is : Understanding .Net - A tutorial and analysis
    gonna get my C++ book, thanks again

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