More wireless terms
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: More wireless terms

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    510

    Post More wireless terms

    This article is a bit of an add-on to XTC's sticky

    http://www.antionline.com/showthread...hreadid=267203

    A wireless LAN security glossary

    802.1X: An authentication standard for LANs and WLANs, used to identify users before allowing their traffic onto the network.

    802.11i: In addition to all the features in WPA, 802.11i uses Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) as a replacement for RC4 encryption.

    Advanced Encryption Standard (AES): AES is the US government standard encryption protocol that replaces Data Encryption Standard.

    Certificate authority: Independent organisations that verify the identities of internal or external network security servers, and give those servers the ability to do the same for clients that connect to them, using encrypted certificates that are verified by the server every time the client logs on.

    Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP): An extension of Point-to-Point Protocol that supports many authentication methods, including Kerberos, public-key authentication and smart cards. In the IEEE's 802.1X, EAP is encapsulated in LAN or WLAN traffic, providing the mechanism for verifying the identity of a user to a RADIUS or other authentication server. There are several varieties of EAP, listed below and explained here

    EAP-Transport Layer Security (EAP-TLS): a Microsoft-created proprietary extension, but this one has been accepted by the IETF as a public standard.

    EAP-Tunneled Transport Layer Security (EAP-TTLS): a proprietary protocol developed by Funk Software and Certicom; under consideration by IETF as a new standard.

    Lightweight Extensible Authentication Protocol (LEAP): a proprietary version of EAP that Cisco developed.

    Protected Extensible Authentication Protocol (PEAP): a proprietary, extended-function version of EAP that Microsoft, Cisco and RSA Security developed.

    Temporal Key Integrity Protocol (TKIP): an encryption protocol designed to provide more secure wireless encryption than WEP by making keys more difficult to crack. TKIP is the encryption mechanism for WPA, but is replaced by AES in 802.11i, which is also known as WPA2.

    Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP): An encryption technique built into 802.11 wireless LANs using 40-bit keys.

    Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA): An industry standard based on a subset of an early draft of 802.11i. WPA replaces WEP's keying mechanism with a more robust system, called Temporal Key Integrity Protocol (TKIP). WPA adds a strong message-integrity check and allows for authentication using 802.1X.

    From
    http://www.techworld.com/networking/...FeatureID=1295
    \"You got a mouth like an outboard motor..all the time putt putt putt\" - Foghorn Leghorn

  2. #2
    Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Yes
    Posts
    4,424
    Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA): An industry standard based on a subset of an early draft of 802.11i. WPA replaces WEP's keying mechanism with a more robust system, called Temporal Key Integrity Protocol (TKIP). WPA adds a strong message-integrity check and allows for authentication using 802.1X.
    WPA with TKIP is probably going to obsolete in a matter of (insert short time frame here)... WPA with AES is the light at the end of the tunnel

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    65
    Hallo,

    Quick question if I may please. If have seen the acronym of WAP to be used for Wireless Application Protocol, but also used as Wireless Access Point. Is the correct usage for WAP the former or latter of what I mentioned? Also are Access Points just known as APs?

    Thank you!

  4. #4
    Senior Member RoadClosed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    3,834
    Is the correct usage for WAP the former or latter of what I mentioned? Also are Access Points just known as APs?
    ALL the above. Depends on context.

    Connect to the WAP
    Connect to the AP
    We use WAP
    West of House
    You are standing in an open field west of a white house, with a boarded front door.
    There is a small mailbox here.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    1,199
    Connect to the WAP
    Connect to the AP
    We use WAP
    Connect to the wireless access point
    Connect to the access point
    We use wireless access points??

    gotta be the devils advocate some times....
    Everyone is going to die, I am just as good of a reason as any.

    http://think-smarter.blogspot.com

  6. #6
    Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Yes
    Posts
    4,424
    WAP = Wireless Application Protocol
    WPA = Wi-fi Protected Access
    AP = Access Point

    I don't think WAP is an official abbreviation for Wireless Access Point - the term Wireless Access Point is used by all major manufacturers of AP's, but I've never seen them use the abbreviation WAP. WAP as in Wireless Application Protocol does not apply to the AP's we're talking about here, since one of the "requirements" for WAP is "hand-held", as in mobile phones and PDA's and such...

  7. #7
    Senior Member RoadClosed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    3,834
    Lol, all of my network diagrams have WAP on them when there is a wireless access point. Gateway, Router, FireWall, WAP. Is it official? Probably not.

    We use wireless application protocol is what I meant (for XTC). Like "we us WAP to push work stoppage reports to PDAs." WAP is pretty much been superceded already with next gen applications ready for bigger pipes. In fact now that I think of it WAP is used frequently as an acronym for WAP gateways like Cisco and even services like AvantGo. 3G will tax current WAP application gateways but I know 2.0 addresses the issues a little but Wireless Markup Language is out there. Oh and Java is cropping up as an alternative. Last couple of phones I had use Java in place of WAP. Although I suspect it's just a front end.
    West of House
    You are standing in an open field west of a white house, with a boarded front door.
    There is a small mailbox here.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    65
    WAP = Wireless Application Protocol
    WPA = Wi-fi Protected Access
    AP = Access Point

    I don't think WAP is an official abbreviation for Wireless Access Point - the term Wireless Access Point is used by all major manufacturers of AP's, but I've never seen them use the abbreviation WAP. WAP as in Wireless Application Protocol does not apply to the AP's we're talking about here, since one of the "requirements" for WAP is "hand-held", as in mobile phones and PDA's and such...
    Achso. Danke!

    Also thanks to the other replies, it lets me know that some of the IT acronyms can be at least a confusing lot.

  9. #9
    AO Senior Cow-beller
    Moderator
    zencoder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Mountain standard tribe.
    Posts
    1,177
    I like the term 'desperate mode' which is what WinXP SP-0 does off the shelf with Wifi enabled.

    Ad-Hoc, Infrastructure, or Any (any == desperate mode.)

    Sorry. </off topic>

    You also have folks refering to VERSIONS of WPA, such as WPA2. WPA2 is usually used as a psuedonym for 802.11i.
    "Data is not necessarily information. Information does not necessarily lead to knowledge. And knowledge is not always sufficient to discover truth and breed wisdom." --Spaf
    Anyone who is capable of getting themselves made president should on no account be allowed to do the job. --Douglas Adams (1952-2001)
    "...people find it far easier to forgive others for being wrong than being right." - Albus Percival Wulfric Brian Dumbledore

  10. #10
    AO's MMA Fanatic! Computernerd22's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Miami, FL
    Posts
    795
    Here is an excellent URL

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •