A Simple IP Question
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Thread: A Simple IP Question

  1. #1

    A Simple IP Question

    Ok, I've got a very basic question, just need to know what command I'm looking for.

    I've got a new network monitoring program and I'm trying to figure out which IP addresses it shows belongs to which machines in this building. I have them all identified except for a few, and those few I have no idea for the life of me who the addresses belong to.

    So what I want to do is use the IP address to find the host name. I know this is a basic thing, so I just need to remember what the command to use is. I'm used to pinging the host name to find the IP, so I'm just trying to figure out how to do vice-versa.

  2. #2
    Just Another Geek
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    nslookup? Probably not..

    nbtstat -a <ip-address> works wonders on windows too.

    If these machines get a DHCP address you might want to check the leases too.

    Dunno.. just shooting in the dark
    Oliver's Law:
    Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
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    Hi AngelicKnight

    I am not sure what exactly you mean:

    First idea: NetBIOS hostname
    Code:
    > nbtstat -A 192.168.1.65
    Second idea: Reverse lookup (if, if and if). For example
    (...you get the idea):
    Code:
    > nslookup
    > set type=ptr
    > 65.1.168.192.in-addr.arpa

    Also shooting in the dark

    Cheers.
    If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.
    (Abraham Maslow, Psychologist, 1908-70)

  4. #4
    AO Ancient: Team Leader
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    Even easier guys:-

    ping -a 192.168.1.1

    the -a = address resolution
    Don\'t SYN us.... We\'ll SYN you.....
    \"A nation that draws too broad a difference between its scholars and its warriors will have its thinking done by cowards, and its fighting done by fools.\" - Thucydides

  5. #5
    Thanks guys, that did it!

  6. #6
    Ok, now I have this one address that I'm seeing on the network but I have no idea who it belongs to. The LAN IP is 192.168.1.245. Now check this out:

    C:\Documents and Settings\Administrator>ping -a 192.168.1.245

    Pinging 192.168.1.245 with 32 bytes of data:

    Reply from 192.168.1.245: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=128
    Reply from 192.168.1.245: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=128
    Reply from 192.168.1.245: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=128
    Reply from 192.168.1.245: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=128

    Ping statistics for 192.168.1.245:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
    Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms

    C:\Documents and Settings\Administrator>nbtstat -A 192.168.1.245

    Local Area Connection 2:
    Node IpAddress: [192.168.1.34] Scope Id: []

    Host not found.

    Didn't tell me anything, but the software for the new managed switch we're running shows the address as very much being there and active.

  7. #7
    Just Another Geek
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    Originally posted here by Tiger Shark
    Even easier guys:-

    ping -a 192.168.1.1

    the -a = address resolution
    Hehe I kinda assumed anyone with 1500+ posts would do a ping /? or man ping



    AngelicKnight: Do these machines get their addresses from dhcp? You might want to check that. clients usually register their hostname at the dhcp server.
    Oliver's Law:
    Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.

  8. #8
    Hehe I kinda assumed anyone with 1500+ posts would do a ping /? or man ping
    Shhh...I was just...um...testing you guys...yeah...that's it...

    Yes, they do get it from DHCP. But the wierd thing is that in DHCP on my domain controller, these addresses don't show up. Nor do they in DNS.

  9. #9
    Just Another Geek
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    Ah. Maybe a rogue machine?

    How about disabling the switchport?
    Oliver's Law:
    Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.

  10. #10
    They call me the Hunted foxyloxley's Avatar
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    Vary the subnet to exclude the 254, and see who comes calling

    192.168.1.245
    255.255.255.244 ?

    I'm just studying this NOW ......
    and it is HURTING :toothache:
    I'm assuming a subnet of 255.255.255.0 ?
    So the new one would only allow the first 244 connections ?

    flame away
    55 - I'm fiftyfeckinfive and STILL no wiser,
    OLDER yes
    Beware of Geeks bearing GIF's
    come and waste the day :P at The Taz Zone

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