'puter 'ponents - Page 3
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 31

Thread: 'puter 'ponents

  1. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    400

    Exclamation

    Capacitance in Farads (any know why those names.. now no cheating Google searches are banned..I am watching)
    No Googling, and I can prove it:

    Farads, a standard unit of capacitance due to it's inventor Michael Faraday.

    Ohms, from inventor of Ohms law, don't remember the name, (Billy Joe Bob Ohms?)

    Resistor, some one who resists paying their taxes

    Transistor, What you call your brother when he's wearing your sister's clothing.

    Okay..okay...at least the first one is right.

    ZT3000
    Beta tester of "0"s and "1"s"

  2. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,024

    Mr Ohm and Mr Farad ?
    Although the Farad is FAR too large a unit, and is invariably expressed as micro-farads
    So are amps in most cases, it really just depends on what you personally happen to be working with...
    [H]ard|OCP <--Best hardware/gaming news out there--|
    pwned.nl <--Gamers will love this one --|
    Light a man a fire and you\'ll keep him warm for a day, Light a man ON fire and you\'ll keep him warm the rest of his life.

  3. #23
    ********** |ceWriterguy
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    1,608
    Ok, now the google answers since I just had to go look...

    http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~...cians/Ohm.html

    for information about Georg Simon Ohm

    and

    http://scienceworld.wolfram.com/biography/Faraday.html

    for Michael Faraday

    Georg was a mathmetician, Michael a bookbinder. For further info click the links.

    For Solid State and a good definition, check
    http://whatis.techtarget.com/definit...500174,00.html

    and for Thermionic look at
    http://www.bartleby.com/61/65/T0156500.html
    for a definition and
    http://www.thermionic.org/
    for a breadboarded picture integrating a thermionic tube.

    For Transistors check
    http://www.interq.or.jp/japan/se-inoue/e_transist.htm

    Damn that brought back memories... npn, pnp... I still like calling folks zener (xener?) diodes though - In semi-acceptable language a zener is a one-way mofo

    Now if we're getting into stuff, I'd like to see our beginning electronics newbie define

    a coulomb, and what it is in relation to the definition of a volt,

    the definition of one amp,

    and what is dielectric constant in relation to capacitors (since we were on farads earlier I thought this would be an interesting thing to look at..)

    Oh, and what, in electrical terms, do the letters RC mean, and how are they related to the formula 1/lRC? (no, not remote control...keep at it).

    No googling at least until several hours have passed
    Even a broken watch is correct twice a day.

    Which coder said that nobody could outcode Microsoft in their own OS? Write a bit and make a fortune!

  4. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,024
    1 amp = 1C/s IIRC
    Coloumbs are the amount of power flowing during a specific time period...
    RC.... RC.... dangit, where'd it go? *Smacks head* Someone else can answer that one...

    Dielectric constant... Is that the rule that states everythign that goes in comes out?
    [H]ard|OCP <--Best hardware/gaming news out there--|
    pwned.nl <--Gamers will love this one --|
    Light a man a fire and you\'ll keep him warm for a day, Light a man ON fire and you\'ll keep him warm the rest of his life.

  5. #25
    The Doctor Und3ertak3r's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    2,744
    Dielectric
    To Die Electricly..?

    (oh bugger.. I am fighting with a smoothwall installation that dosent want to update ..I'll come back to this when I have beaten the box to a pulp)
    "Consumer technology now exceeds the average persons ability to comprehend how to use it..give up hope of them being able to understand how it works." - Me http://www.cybercrypt.co.nr

  6. #26
    ********** |ceWriterguy
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    1,608
    Valiant Efforts indeed!

    First we must define Voltage. Voltage is a difference in electrical potential between two points.

    Now we add in the definition of one volt -

    1 volt equals a difference in potential of one coulomb of charge between 2 points. It is important for the electrician to remember that volts are stationary, amps do the moving as I'll define in a sec.

    1 coulomb of charge is approximately equal to 6.24506 times 10^18 electrons. It is so named for Charles-Augustin de Coulomb, the first to measure it and equate it to a Volt.

    1 amp is the movement of that coulomb of charge across the two points, which will occur when voltage is present. Yes, I learned electron flow theory. For those of you who learned hole flow theory, there's a whole different school of thought here.

    dielectric constant is the measurement of how well the dielectric material between the plates of a capacitor will permit electrical flow. It is important in that the dielectric material is what contains the electrons when the capacitor charges. When you discuss Farads, this is what you're discussing.

    RC - Resistance times Capacitance - is the formula for calculating the length of time it will take a capacitor to charge within a capacitive circuit. For a very good source on this I strongly recommend
    http://othello.mech.northwestern.edu...k/elec5/RC.htm
    It's one of the best I've seen since A school.

    1/lRC - is the formula for calculating the time it will take a capacitor to charge in an inductive circuit. In plain english, it is read as the inverse of inductance times resistance times capacitance. Unfortunately I wasn't able to find a source on my first page of googling and I was too lazy to look further. It's out there, I promise. The page on RC time constants talks all around it but never does mention this particular formula.

    And finally I'll add in KVL since it was one of my favorites and got my butt out of cracks many times. Kirchoff's voltage law, which states basically that everything in a circuit except the voltage, when added together, will equal the voltage. (all things equal zero).


    [edit]I fixed the missing 'm' in the link so it should work now[/edit]
    Even a broken watch is correct twice a day.

    Which coder said that nobody could outcode Microsoft in their own OS? Write a bit and make a fortune!

  7. #27
    Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    1,161
    I knew right when I read the first def it was going to be a no holds barred, Guru warning no guru warning.

    Anyway, I just like to add some other important devices in.

    MOSFET The MOSFET, or Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor, is by far the most common field effect transistor in both digital and analog circuits. The MOSFET is composed of a channel of n-type or p-type semiconductor material (see article on semiconductor devices), and is accordingly called an NMOSFET or a PMOSFET. Usually the semiconductor of choice is silicon, but some chip manufacturers, most notably IBM, have begun to use a mixture of silicon and germanium (SiGe) in MOSFET channels. Unfortunately, many semiconductors with better electrical properties than silicon, such as gallium arsenide, do not form good gate oxides and thus are not suitable for MOSFETs.

    The gate terminal is a layer of polysilicon (polycrystalline silicon; why polysilicon is used will be explained below) placed over the channel, but separated from the channel by a thin layer of insulating silicon dioxide. When a voltage is applied between the gate and source terminals, the electric field generated penetrates through the oxide and creates a so-called "inversion channel" in the channel underneath. The inversion channel is of the same type—p-type or n-type—as the source and drain, so it provides a conduit through which current can pass. Varying the voltage between the gate and body modulates the conductivity of this layer and makes it possible to control the current flow between drain and source.


    Chipset/Northbridge/Southbridge Chipset refers to a group of integrated circuits ("chips") that are designed to work together, and are usually marketed as a single product.

    In computing, the term chipset is commonly used to refer to the specialized motherboard chips on a computer or expansion card. When discussing personal computers (PCs) based on recent Intel Pentium-class systems, the term "chipset" often refers to the two main motherboard chips: the northbridge and southbridge. The manufacturer of a chipset can be, and often is, independent from the manufacturer of the motherboard. Examples of PC motherboard chipsets include NVIDIA's nForce chipset and VIA Technologies' KT800, both for AMD processors, or one of Intel's many chipsets (see, for example, [1] (http://developer.intel.com/design/chipsets/)).

    The term "chipset" was also widely used in the 1980s and 1990s for the custom audio and graphics chips in home computers, games consoles and arcade game hardware of the time. Examples include the Amiga's Original Chip Set or SEGA's System 16 chipset.

    Computer systems produced since the late 1980s often share commonly used chipsets, even across widely disparate computing specialties—for example, the NCR 53C9x, a low-cost chipset implementing a SCSI interface to storage devices and the like, could be found not only in UNIX machines (such as the MIPS Magnum), but also in embedded devices and personal computers.

    Found at: http://en.wikipedia.org and I'd suggest you run all them above for the correct information.

    Micro Cool Heatsinks for MOSFET's I cool mine just because I can.....plus, adds to better, steady voltage.

  8. #28
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    510

    Thumbs up

    I commend every who posted in this thread. While there wasn't a lot of agreement with the original post, rather than neg it into oblivion everyone put in their 2 cents and created an informative post. I also give credit to Memy for willingness to take constructive criticism rather than pout and lash out in response.

    Good job all around.
    \"You got a mouth like an outboard motor..all the time putt putt putt\" - Foghorn Leghorn

  9. #29
    The Doctor Und3ertak3r's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    2,744
    I commend every who posted in this thread. While there wasn't a lot of agreement with the original post, rather than neg it into oblivion everyone put in their 2 cents and created an informative post. I also give credit to Memy for willingness to take constructive criticism rather than pout and lash out in response.
    This thread could have ended on the first page in flames, memy could have left in disgust.. instead it has become a pseudo-electronics tutorial.. good..

    Now I add three more questions:

    1/ A short Curcuit.. what is it..How does it cause house fires? ..or maligned malingerer?
    Why isnt there a Long Curcuit? and could it be the hidden partner in crime.. or is it just not a sexy name..?

    2/ Impedance and resistance.. the same thing or completly different
    .. what are the differences..?

    3/ Heating of components, Power=EI is one.. but some components Transistors/FET's in certain circuits "over Heat" but the circuit current is no where near the components rating and nor is the voltage.. so why?


    We've had some bloody good posts here, how about a couple of new faces.. (btw.. if you do google/use a web reference on this one.. please post the links you used..
    "Consumer technology now exceeds the average persons ability to comprehend how to use it..give up hope of them being able to understand how it works." - Me http://www.cybercrypt.co.nr

  10. #30
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,024
    1. The insulation on wires sitting next to each other gets worn out, the two wires create another circuit (hence, short circuit) the resistance become less, the wires are getting all the electricty and none of the devices are, so they heat up and cause fires.

    2. Impedance is resistance at certain frequencies IIRC...
    [H]ard|OCP <--Best hardware/gaming news out there--|
    pwned.nl <--Gamers will love this one --|
    Light a man a fire and you\'ll keep him warm for a day, Light a man ON fire and you\'ll keep him warm the rest of his life.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

 Security News

     Patches

       Security Trends

         How-To

           Buying Guides