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  1. #21
    Just a Virtualized Geek MrLinus's Avatar
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    I had completely forgotten about the Ti-Cats (it's that rivalry between the Ti-Cats and the Argos).

    Source
    And in the tongue-in-cheek department, in response to a lawsuit filed against Apple by TigerDirect, Bob Young, CEO of Lulu.com(an independent publishing site) and owner of the Hamilton Tiger-Cats (a professional Canadian football team) has offered to step in and help out Apple during this trying time.

    Tiger Direct, a Florida-based sellers of computer parts and components, doesn’t like Apple’ use of the code name “Tiger” for Mac OS X 10.4 On May 28, it filed a suit against the Mac maker for infringing on its trademark.

    “This lawsuit is a load of codswallop,” Young says. “Nobody and no company should have the exclusive use of the word ‘tiger’.”

    He’s offered to license the Hamilton Tiger-Cats historical use of the word Tiger to Apple free of charge. The Hamilton Tigers Football Club was established in 1869 and prior to World War II, the team was known as the Tigers. The colors of yellow and black were well represented and the present philosophy of tough football was established in those early days, Young says In 1950, the Hamilton Tigers merged with the Hamilton Wildcats to become the Hamilton Tiger-Cats.

    “136 years ago we were called The Tigers,” Young says. “If anyone owns the exclusive rights to the word “tiger” with that much history and tradition, it’s gotta be us!”

    Robert F. (Bob) Young is CEO of Lulu.com, which provides independent publishers with free access to on-demand publishing tools for books, e-books, music, images and calendars. The Hamilton Tiger-Cats are entering their 136th year of competitive football. Bob became owner in October of 2003. Hamilton has won 15 Grey Cups during their existence.
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  2. #22
    Just a Virtualized Geek MrLinus's Avatar
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    Well no surprise at the results:

    Source: MacNN

    A Florida Federal Court has ruled that Apple's use of the 'Tiger' moniker does not infringe upon retailer TigerDirect's trademark, denying a preliminary injunction that was sought earlier this month against Apple. The court said that "there is greater risk of damage to Apple from granting the injunction than any potential harm to TigerDirect from Apple's use of Tiger marks," according to AppleInsider. At the hearing, Apple used user surveys, evidence of a plethora other 'Tiger'-based names in the computer industry, and testimony by Senior VP Phil Schiller: "Apple also entered into evidence a survey that revealed only 6% of consumers associated the name 'Tiger' with TigerDirect. Meanwhile, the survey of 517 people showed that only 4 people associated the name "Tiger" with a company... Apple asserted that TigerDirect does not posses a protected family of Tiger marks."
    Goodbye, Mittens (1992-2008). My pillow will be cold without your purring beside my head
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  3. #23
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    Originally posted here by Striek And let's not forget, they are American companies. The United States is the most sue-happy nation on Earth. This is mainly doe to the fact that, as far as I know, anybody can sue anybody for anything, unlike most other countries where lawsuits must be approved by a preliminary hearing first. Let's face it, we're talking about a country where someone won a 3 million dollar lawsuit because her coffee was too hot.
    Yeah, let's face it!

    It was called "THE MCDONALD'S SCALDING COFFEE CASE" for a reason.

    As I'm sure we all know by now what the boiling point of H2o is. A simple question, rather a simple experiment. Go to the stove and bring some tap water up to 180 - 190 degrees fahrenheit. Would you attempt to drink it? Before you do something that ignorant, let me tell you that "a scholar in thermodynamics as applied to human skin burns, testified that liquids, at 180 degrees, will cause a full thickness burn to human skin in two to seven seconds.""An approximate one-second exposure to 160° F water will result in third degree burns.1 Where the water is 130° F, an approximate half-minute exposure will result in third degree burns.2".

    The chairman of the department of mechanical engineering and bio-mechanical engineering at the University of Texas testified that this risk of harm is unacceptable, as did a widely recognized expert on burns, the editor in chief of the leading scholarly publication in the specialty, the Journal of Burn Care and Rehabilitation;

    A vascular surgeon determined that Liebeck suffered full thickness burns (or third-degree burns) over 6 percent of her body, including her inner thighs, perineum, buttocks, and genital and groin areas. She was hospitalized for eight days, during which time she underwent skin grafting. Liebeck, who also underwent debridement treatments, sought to settle her claim for $20,000, but McDonald's refused.

    During discovery, McDonald's produced documents showing more than 700 claims by people burned by its coffee between 1982 and 1992. Some claims involved third-degree burns substantially similar to Liebeck's. This history documented McDonald's knowledge about the extent and nature of this hazard.

    McDonald's also said during discovery that, based on a consultant's advice, it held its coffee at between 180 and 190 degrees fahrenheit to maintain optimum taste.

    Coffee at that temperature, if spilled, causes third-degree burns (the skin is burned away down to the muscle/fatty-tissue layer) in two to seven seconds;

    Third-degree burns do not heal without skin grafting, debridement and whirlpool treatments that cost tens of thousands of dollars and result in permanent disfigurement, extreme pain and disability of the victim for many months, and in some cases, years;

    It was more than a valid case.

  4. #24
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    That lawsuit is so stupid. If people would like Tigerdirect, all they would have to type in a search engine is "Tiger Direct" and its the first listing. It's really amazing what companies are starting to sue for.
    In my mind, the wheel is spinning, but the hamster is dead.

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