Y2038 bug may hit Unix, Linux machines
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Y2038 bug may hit Unix, Linux machines

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    373

    Y2038 bug may hit Unix, Linux machines

    What is special about this date? It is explained that Unix and similar operating systems do not calculate time based on the Gregorian calendar. Instead, they are known to simply count time in seconds from their arbitrary "birthday", that is, GMT 00:00:00, Thursday, January 1, 1970. The accepted practice among software programmers is to use a 32-bit variable for this number (32-bit signed time_t).
    Experts are of the opinion that Linux users will be the hardest hit, because of the wider acceptance of this OS for its security and cost features. They are feared to grind to a virtual halt or go into a loop. This Linux's own Y2K nightmare can be more damaging than the Y2K bug, because the latter basically involved applications while the 2038 bug affects the time-keeping function itself.
    Linux gurus are apprehensive about the bug's impact on the embedded field, where software does not get replaced frequently.
    http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/show/2707.html

    I would like to hear from these so called "Experts" and "Linux gurus"

  2. #2
    Senior Member gore's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    7,177
    Wow, 33 more years and we are ****ED!

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    373
    Wow, 33 more years and we are ****ED!
    gore, you do remember what happened with y2k, don't you? Alot of wasted money going on in the company I worked for back then, although there was some overtime to be had. Just sitting around waiting for something to happen.

  4. #4
    Senior Member gore's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    7,177
    I know how you feel. My best friend was waiting with an Assault rifle. In case it happened. I was out.

  5. #5
    Senior Member nihil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    United Kingdom: Bridlington
    Posts
    17,191
    Well, I shall be dead before it happens

    I would imagine that the solution will be similar to Y2K? you just create a rolling 99 year window? effectively moving the "birthday" forwards in time.

    Mind you, I can't say that I entirely agree with the quoted sentiments. I would have thought it was the CMOS real time clock that kept the time, rather than the operating system?.............after all what happens when you switch the computer off?????????????

    Also, Apple computers were born in 1900 and use a 3 digit year.

    Just a thought

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •