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Thread: Proxies

  1. #31
    Senior Member kr5kernel's Avatar
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    I agree with thehorse, this was all brought up because someone said they would go to a library or a school to utilize machies for an attack. He merely backed up my point that those places have system administrators too, and that security tends to be taken a little more heavy than security cameras.

    question: Would Richard Stallmen help my security by being in the closet? Perhaps he could write a manifesto for me while he is there.

    I agree security is important to everyone, in my opinion what would comp usa or a best buy need there computers hooked up to the internet for anyway? The demo models for sure? They are asking for abuse, but thats ignorance on their part. Part of staying up on security is learning how to avoid "best buy attacks" by setting up your network correctly to filter out that crap.
    kr5kernel
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  2. #32
    Master-Jedi-Pimps0r & Moderator thehorse13's Avatar
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    there's no reason to call me a "fool" ...
    This is a figure of speech but if the shoe fits...

    Here you are advising people to go to a school or library stating that cameras are the only concern...

    In my opinion, if anyone would try to do somthing malicious it would be much easier to simply use a computer in a school, library, CompUSA or any other location w/ Innternet access. You'd only have to worry about cameras
    And here you are discussing a completely different topic which happens to be the content of one of my threads called Disturbing Trend - Hiding in plain sight. I guess you must be the l33t hax0r I'm looking for. Note that you also change your position from the above statement too. http://www.antionline.com/showthread...hreadid=268309

    but attacker will not use "your network" or "my network" simply BECAUSE they are secure. h/she will use a CompUSA e-machine, Best Buy application center and not every library has R. Stallmen sitting in a closet. In a weekend of driving around you can probably find and create 20-30 zombies in different places. then attacker can just DOS your "secure network".
    So at very least, you are counter productive to this thread and in my book; a fool.

    --TH13
    Our scars have the power to remind us that our past was real. -- Hannibal Lecter.
    Talent is God given. Be humble. Fame is man-given. Be grateful. Conceit is self-given. Be careful. -- John Wooden

  3. #33
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    Unless you have the wherewithal to single-handedly create your own backbone super-network, I'd say forget the idea of proxies. They are a fad of the past for the sk33d3rs (90's). Dodging forums measures, dodging multiplayer server mods, storing your passwords on proxy supplier severs perhaps?

    I'm willing to bet you draw attention to yourself by using them. I'm going to take a wild guess and say that they're able to shoot you rogue packets from your ISP containing something like Cyber Knight>>>Magic Lantern.


    Just felt like scaring the sk33di3s today.

  4. #34
    Master-Jedi-Pimps0r & Moderator thehorse13's Avatar
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    Well Soda makes a good point in that TOR is the new way to "hide" on the net. I'd use that long before I would a proxy.

    Now, to answer his question...
    So in short, how does the end of the route decrypt the traffic originating from myself, without making any contact with me (the entire point of tor) without passing a key along? If the source would know the destiniation, to say provide it with a public key, then the destination would know who the source is defeating the purpose of the onion route???
    Yes, a symetrical key is passed along. The reason why the destination will not know where you are lies in this statement from the folks over at TOR:

    The circuit is extended one hop at a time, and each server along the way knows only which server gave it data and which server it is giving data to. No individual server ever knows the complete path that a data packet has taken. The client negotiates a separate set of encryption keys for each hop along the circuit to ensure that each hop can't trace these connections as they pass through.

    There ya have it Soda. Make sense?
    Our scars have the power to remind us that our past was real. -- Hannibal Lecter.
    Talent is God given. Be humble. Fame is man-given. Be grateful. Conceit is self-given. Be careful. -- John Wooden

  5. #35
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    Do yourself a favor and stop disagreeing w/ me just to disagree. I am pretty much saying the same thing as you. You’ve said that proxies aren’t “really” as anonymous as they are portrayed. I agree w/ you.

    I was just trying to illustrate that in case of malicious intent there are other/better ways to “cover your tracks”. Running the malware from a system OTHER THEN YOURS is pretty much the first thing on the list, therefore making proxies obsolete for anyone serious in covering their tracks. These can be accomplished in many ways (intrusion, Trojan), I only illustrated the easiest one. Simply taking over a publicly accessible system. I am not discussing anything that happens on target’s end.

    Conclusion: proxy is a skiddie fad, maybe useful in anonymous browsing from workplace, if that.

    Point being made: I AGREE W/ YOU

    PS: everyone is a tough on Internet, even my little sister. So to sample real life, start by telling you family that they are fools.

  6. #36
    That does sound about right, however it means the hops have to be "trusted"() in the network for the encryption to really mean anything... plus it's symmetric so you could read the key between hops anyway. So what's it take to be a node in the tor onion route? Looks like anyone can participate:
    http://tor.eff.org/cvs/tor/doc/tor-doc.html#server

    Which means that use of this proxy will do it's job covering the source but won't prevent the .gov or a skiddie from adding their server to the network. (I wonder if tor validates the servers before popping them into the network?). The symmetric encryption is more of a courtesy than a means of protection, at least it's how it sounds from your description.

  7. #37
    Master-Jedi-Pimps0r & Moderator thehorse13's Avatar
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    So to sample real life, start by telling you family that they are fools.
    Huh?

    PS: everyone is a tough on Internet, even my little sister.
    Ummmm, perhaps. Are you suggesting that I'm a 90lb 17 year old out to simply piss you off?

    Do yourself a favor and stop disagreeing w/ me just to disagree.
    Is this what you think? Do you read your posts? You disagree with yourself.

    Anyway, when you post something worthwhile and correct, I will respond accordingly.
    Our scars have the power to remind us that our past was real. -- Hannibal Lecter.
    Talent is God given. Be humble. Fame is man-given. Be grateful. Conceit is self-given. Be careful. -- John Wooden

  8. #38
    Senior Member kr5kernel's Avatar
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    I just fired up the tor client and gave onion routing a go. I am impressed....

    The speed seems very nice, I was mainly looking for proxies when this thred started to conceal my ip in irc. Nothing malicious. onion routing seems to be the way to go, and its pretty quick as well!
    kr5kernel
    (kr5kernel at hotmail dot com)
    Linux: Making Penguins Cool Since 1994.

  9. #39
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    As the owner of a computer security company, I have tested so many proxies over the years. The one I use now is the TOR client. In order for TOR to be effective, you must also run the PRIVOXY client, which can be found on TOR's dl site. It is extremely effective at concealing your ISP and IP, but as many have mentioned before, no matter how many hops you set up, no matter how many proxies you daisy chain together, in the end, if someone wants to find you, has the time, the means and the patience, they will eventually be able to extract the originating IP, even if you have subscribed to an Anonymous service. Logs, in the form of paper or 1's and 0's will eventually reveal YOU. You can, however, minimized your exposure by limiting your time online, and physically disconnecting your CAT5 from your NIC when not in use. One small trick is to find out exactly what time your ISP's servers refresh their IP's, then, when they refresh, open up a CMD line, dump your IP, refresh your DNS, and if you time it just right, you can effectively GHOST your IP. This means the server at your ISP will only see the last known IP for your box, and will not refresh it, essentially assigning you the same IP as you had before your refresh and the server's reset, and at that point, you will have a new IP at your physical location, but from the ISP's logs, your old IP will show up, thus GHOSTING your IP.

    BTW: I watch from the back, and only make RARE posts when I find something of interest, which is not much. If you want to see my work, you may see my sites:

    http://www.centcomcomputers.net/

    http://www.3cintelligentsecuritysolutions.com/


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