being a sysad
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Thread: being a sysad

  1. #1
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    being a sysad

    hi i just wanna ask...or wanna know the abilities of a system/network administrator.
    what are their works? what programming language do they use?
    i hope of becoming one when correct people are with me.
    thank you for the time.
    .sig na ture.

  2. #2
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    Hey Hey,

    I think I understand most of what you are asking... I'm guessing that English isn't your first language, so you may want to consider using the Google or Babelfish translators to assist you with your posts.

    Abilities of a System/Network Administrator

    This could be widely varied, are you talking a large corporation with lots of money, the tasks would be specialized more so than a smaller corporation without a lot of capital to spend on IT.

    System and Network Admins are often two different people, again depending on the size of the network.

    Basically you're looking for an extensive knowledge in the desktop and server operating systems that the company is running. Is it a Windows, Linux or Mac based network... or is it a mixture of systems.. Regardless, know the systems...

    Know security. This would be the CIA model (Confidentiality, Integrity and Availablility).. and possibly something like the Cisco Secure Wheel (Which I've seen taught two ways -- Secure, Moniter, Test, Implement and Design, Secure, Monitor Test and Manage) and the Plan --> Protect --> Respond cycle.. If you know, and practice, these and are knowledgeable of the device you are working with, you'll be off to a great start in the security world.

    Know networking... While the CCNA I can implement a router setup is a nice start (Nortel NetKnowledge is a little more indepth)... going beyond this is useful. Perhaps the CCNP which is more design focused... It has some nice troubleshooting methodologies and some more advanced corporate type setups. Basically know the devices you are working with (knowledge of the devices is always key). Also know the basics... the protocols and their functions... the operation of the media, items like the OSI Model and the TCP model.

    Then you just need to learn specific software and tools... Maybe an IDS, or a packet sniffer... A security auditing tool (CoreIMPACT, Nessus, Microsoft Baseline Security Analyzer, anything that will help you in your job).

    Know the implementation and setup of the servers the company is running... know how that software functions (Exchange, postfix, or qmail... or maybe IIS vs Apache).

    As far as programming languages... a lot of network admins never touch programming... and most courses that I've found never teach programming to their network admins. Things that are vital to you depend on your area of expertise though. If you are going into a Windows type setting know how to make batch files and write vbs scripts. Perl or Python can't hurt. If you're going into a *nix area, then Perl and Shell Scripting will be your best friends.. and Python or C/C++ never hurt.

    Learn some database basics.... the general usage of SQL... Learn some ASP (if you get VBS down, you're fine for this) and some PHP... a lot of management front-ends use these languages now and it's very nice to be able to customize them to suit your needs.

    Other than that, be eager to learn. To many network admins ruin their networks by not keeping up with the times and growing lazy once they secure their job..

    If you can accomplish this that you're off to a great start....

    Anyways, hope you found this helpful.

    Peace,
    HT

    PS
    Has anyone else had issues with the spell checker freezing?
    IT Blog: .:Computer Defense:.
    PnCHd (Pronounced Pinched): Acronym - Point 'n Click Hacked. As in: "That website was pinched" or "The skiddie pinched my computer because I forgot to patch".

  3. #3
    Frustrated Mad Scientist
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    If you work for a small company and they call you their Sysadmin or Network Admin (or more likely the 'Computer Guy') you will be responsible for everything that plugs into the wall and doesn't make food.

    You will also be resonsible for any random bit of electrical equipment that any member of staff brings to work.

    If you fix a home computer for any other member of staff you have created a binding contract to service their computer/s for the rest of your life, and their friends, relatives and neighbours.

    You will be expected to be an expert in every computer language ever created.

    You must memorise and have instant recall of every windows error code.

    Telepathy and the ability to be in 2 or more places at once are also mandatory for the job.

    You also have no time off and will be expected to solve computer issues in the supermarket, pub, football ground, etc.

    Welcome to the world of IT.

  4. #4
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    You forgot magical skills to know everything about and doing with the internet and what is on the internet.

    If somebody needs the lyrics to a song of wich he only knows the first 5 tones and the name of the band. You will know what song it is and where to find the lyrics. And where to download the song. And how to remove the text from the song so they can use it for karaoke.

    You can also magicly know any and all passwords your boss mistyped in a webapp you have absulutly no knolidge off.

    <all happend>

    Anyway yeah it kinda depends on the organisation. Im am like asp's computer dude. if it dont work call him. If you dont understand call him. If your leased copier(not printer) don't work, make him look at it.
    Since the beginning of time, Man has searched for the answers to the big questions: \'How did we get here?\' \'Is there life after death?\' \'Are we alone?\' But today, in this very theatre, you will be asked to answer the biggest question of them all...WHO LIVES IN A PINEAPPLE UNDER THE SEA?

  5. #5
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    thank you for your great responses. and forgive my english. i hope a lot here can give me more hints regarding my issue of being a system/netwerk admin. english comes second when computer languages is at hand. go figure.
    .sig na ture.

  6. #6
    Senior Member kr5kernel's Avatar
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    Aspman hit the nail right on the head.

    But he forgot one thing,

    No one will ever tell you how great of a job you are doing keeping the network up on a day to day basis, but they sure will let you have it the moment something goes down.

    And then like a TPS report, you will hear about it from as many users as possible in an extremely short period of time.
    kr5kernel
    (kr5kernel at hotmail dot com)
    Linux: Making Penguins Cool Since 1994.

  7. #7
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    Originally posted here by Aspman
    If you work for a small company and they call you their Sysadmin or Network Admin (or more likely the 'Computer Guy') you will be responsible for everything that plugs into the wall and doesn't make food.

    You will also be resonsible for any random bit of electrical equipment that any member of staff brings to work.

    If you fix a home computer for any other member of staff you have created a binding contract to service their computer/s for the rest of your life, and their friends, relatives and neighbours.

    You will be expected to be an expert in every computer language ever created.

    You must memorise and have instant recall of every windows error code.

    Welcome to the world of IT.
    This is very true.

    Some other things I get roped into at my workplace, we have 50 staff so we are fairly small scale.

    Telephone IT support for remote users - usually to people who havent got a clue what their trying to solve, never mind, your telling them how to solve it. I love these people, I get some really entertaining calls.......

    Late nate call outs - terminal services goes down and you get called whatever the time, believe me.

    Technical spreadsheet reports - anything that needs a macro is coming to your office, trust me.

    Expected to know the latest technologys as soon as the MD buys the bit of kit. We just brought a VoIP system and now im meant to be a fluent TAPI programmer when theres barely any source material out there, know the ins and outs of VoIP and be able to record a automated assistant to direct people to the right depts.

    But in all honesty I can truely say its the most rewarding job ever, and no day is ever like the past for me.

  8. #8
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    You are reading my mind

    You guys have all hit this so well it is scary.

    Me personally, I got lucky in finding a small company that is letting me learn to be the computer guy at the same time as being the computer guy. I think the hands on learning I get to do is great.

    One piece of advice in a smaller company would be to try and avoid other non-IT responsibilities. I started out programming a measurement machine and working in QC. When my title changed I was awarded more quality jobs along with finally being recognized as IT. This means that in your job you will have to work hard to find the time to learn when something is not broken.

    But it is still great. I wouldn't change much even if I could. Good luck

    Falcis

  9. #9
    Senior Member kr5kernel's Avatar
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    Oh for sure, small companies especially. The amount of experimentation you get to do and further your knowledge is great.

    And like what was said before, with such a broad range of "skills" to be tapped by the staff, it breaks up the monotony of working in a corporate environment. Everyday is a different challenge, good or bad, but it keeps the job interesting.
    kr5kernel
    (kr5kernel at hotmail dot com)
    Linux: Making Penguins Cool Since 1994.

  10. #10
    THE Bastard Sys***** dinowuff's Avatar
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    Requirements of a SysAdmin:

    [SARCASM] - Sorry long week and it's only Tuesday!

    1. Slap head every time management says: We just bought One Million dollars worth of **** I mean Software.
    1a. Make One Million dollar piece of **** work.

    2. At least a BS in Computer Science. With all the BS in this game, you'll need at least that much.

    3. Good Networking Skills - So that you actually know that your multi-million dollar network is down and the users aren't just complaining because they haven't got the skills, training or a clue as to how to USE it.

    4. Good Communications Skills - So that you can tell a user tactfully and diplomatically that if he (or she) ever does anything as stupid as that again, that you are personally going to choke the living **** out of them.

    5. A Secondary Job Skill - So that when you eventually BURN OUT, you won't starve. You want extra pickle on that?

    6. A deep streak of Masochism, very little life and the ability to wake up nice and cheery at 2am to a panicked phone call from an idiot user who has just done something stupid that is going to cost you two weeks work.

    7. The patience of Job (for eventually you will wish to curse God and die).

    [/SARCASM]
    09:F9:11:02:9D:74:E3:5B8:41:56:C5:63:56:88:C0

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