Online degree programs - they are accredited - but are they respected?
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Thread: Online degree programs - they are accredited - but are they respected?

  1. #1
    Senior Member genXer's Avatar
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    Question Online degree programs - they are accredited - but are they respected?

    I am starting to "jones" for another formal degree - I have my Masters at this point, but NOT an MBA (oh the shame ). So I was going to check out the University of Phoenix and the like - but thought to check with the community here to see that while these schools (like UofP) is accredited - are they respected as a 'valid' school?

    I would like to do the online school, as my current position requires some travel and I do not want to miss any school once I start.

    Thanks!
    \"We\'re the middle children of history.... no purpose or place. We have no Great War, no Great Depression. Our great war is a spiritual war. Our great depression is our lives. We\'ve all been raised by television to believe that one day we\'ll all be millionaires and movie gods and rock stars -- but we won\'t. And we\'re learning slowly that fact. And we\'re very, very pissed off.\" - Tyler (Brad Pitt) Fight Club.

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    AO's Mr Grumpy
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    Re: Online degree programs - they are accredited - but are they respected?

    Originally posted here by genXer
    I am starting to "jones" for another formal degree
    From UK, never come across that expression. What does it mean ?
    Computer says no
    (Carol Beer)

  3. #3
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    Re: Re: Online degree programs - they are accredited - but are they respected?

    Originally posted here by jm459
    From UK, never come across that expression. What does it mean ?
    It means to want or desire something. It originally came from the slang, jonesing for heroin.


    Anyway, Phoenix online is an ok place. I had a friend that finished a degree there recently, and so far no employers have said anything negative about it on his resume. Why not look in to distance learning/degree from a real brick and morter school? I know universities like Duke offer them now but they are more expensive than places like Phoenix.

    Give a man a match and he will be warm for a while, light him on fire and he will be warm for the rest of his life.

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    Senior Member RoadClosed's Avatar
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    Pheonix is an acredited university. In fact my IT degree is with them. But I'll be critical. Most people who have those degrees don't retain jack. UNLESS they have a lot of experience or are and exeptional student. They are more geared to management versus technical ability. It's more about what the student puts in versus what they get out of the learning process with Phoenix. There are a few exeptions but that is my take on it. Would I look down on a degree from them? No but I learned about 4 years ago that degrees show one thing... a willingness to learn and has little to do with knowledge guage. Unfortunately most HR peeps think the opposite.

    If you are getting a degree from the machine, insert handle - turn crank - get paper that's one thing, but if you want to learn find a building to interact with students and teachers.
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  5. #5
    Senior Member genXer's Avatar
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    Thanks for the responses all. I was talking with UofP today about their Doctorate (DBA - doctorate of business admin - yeah! And turn your head and cough! Heh.) program - holy hannah - lots of work and commitment: 30-40 a week for 3 years, plus a residency for 8 days the first year and 3 days the subsequent years, a dissertation that would be defended (in a teleconference or a.k.a audio in the UK). The counsler also stated that another Master's degree would actually mean zip to potential employers and my current employer.

    My work mentor says that an MBA (not just a Masters degree - which I have now) will work to boost one's career - but then again - not sure if the management route is for me - I like it in the trenches.

    Hmmmm.

    Lots of time commitment while balancing work, family w/2 kids and pimpin' - may not work.

    Also I think I just need to think about this more now and reevaluate my goals for life and career. As one famous senior AO member (TH13 - I think) said "You have to own your knowledge" - and maybe another degree is not the way to do it for me. I have been in the security field for just a year now, and maybe I should work to read the many books I have at my disposal on security and see if certs make sense to have for this position.

    Thanks again for the advice!

    Also jm549 - Lv4 already answered your question, but just in case you wanted more - "jonesing" - heh (ok that sucked - but that's why I'm not a comedian) - for more information:

    The Great Jones
    (Etymology)

    Q: East Third Street becomes Great Jones Street between Broadway and the Bowery. Who was Jones and what was so great about him?

    A. Jones is Samuel Jones, a lawyer sometimes called Father of the New York Bar. He owned the land on which Great Jones Street now runs and bequeathed the property to the city with the caveat that any street that ran through the land be named for him.

    In 1789 a street was opened there, but New York already had a Jones Street in Greenwich Village. So the new street was named Great Jones Street because it was wider than the norm.

    In his desire to be remembered, Jones may have linked himself with a different aspect of the city's culture. The slang term "jones," meaning an addiction to drugs, is said to have originated among addicts who lived in Great Jones Alley, off Great Jones Street, between Broadway and Lafayette Street.

    (extract from the "New York Times" site, article by Ed Boland, Jr)

    http://www.nytimes.com/2002/03/17/nyregion/17FYI.html

    My Source: http://www.yaelf.com/slang.shtml
    \"We\'re the middle children of history.... no purpose or place. We have no Great War, no Great Depression. Our great war is a spiritual war. Our great depression is our lives. We\'ve all been raised by television to believe that one day we\'ll all be millionaires and movie gods and rock stars -- but we won\'t. And we\'re learning slowly that fact. And we\'re very, very pissed off.\" - Tyler (Brad Pitt) Fight Club.

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    actually i think that term isn't really used as in "i'm jonesing" it's more like

    i have to drink a six pack to kill the joneses for coke.

  7. #7
    Senior Member RoadClosed's Avatar
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    I agree with one thing, stacking up degrees doesn't mean jack. Go for the doctorate once you feel the need is there. It would be like getting another bachelors degree instead of a masters. As for now, spend time with the family.
    West of House
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    There is a small mailbox here.

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    Senior Member nihil's Avatar
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    Too late my friend,

    1. You have two degrees already.

    2. You have a family and are working.

    Unless you really want to make a serious career change, the additional qualification will mean nothing, unless you want to teach, and it is a teaching ABILITY qualification.

    I can seriously tell you that my time with Price Waterhouse meant more than my educational qualifications..........that is "frontline", not "ivory tower".


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    I've taught in the college setting, though in a vocational program. The Masters you have will get you a faculty position in an academic program, if you are looking that way, without further study. However, the PhD will get you the fat salary.

    The MBA is highly overrated, and MBA's are a dime a dozen. You already have the Masters, look to the PhD if you are ready. Examine the costs in time, effort and money (UofP is very expensive compared to programs available from state institutions or local private schools) Then look at the potential benefit. If you get enough of a raise that it covers the debt you will incur, go for it. But, make sure you have some committment from your employer. A lot can change in two years.




    As for your work mentor, I'd get a second opinion.

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