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Thread: Setting up a domain?

  1. #11
    The Prancing Pirate
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    HT - Thank you for you intricately long, professional, captivating post. No offence taken btw - the only reason I actually want to set up the network is because it will allow me to discover quite a lot about domains, how to set them up, administer them, etc...After looking at your post, I have come to the conclusion that I'm not going to set up a domain - either get a "proper technician" (yeah right, the guys over here don't know sh1te) to set up the domain, or I could just go for a workgroup. Plus, workgroups aren't that bad right? And I know quite a lot about Samba now when it comes to workgroups (many thanks to Ubuntuguide and the Samba docs).

    So, I'm guessing a workgroup wouldn't be too bad right?

    Oh, and foxy: I was kinda joking at first, but if you look closely, I just gave HT some greenies Just for laughs...

    J_K9

    P.S Foxy, d'you mind if I save the France pic in your sig? - Damn funny!
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  2. #12
    THE Bastard Sys***** dinowuff's Avatar
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    Originally posted here by HTRegz


    I partially agree with dinowuff.... except that Domains aren't a pain in the ass to setup and administrate... they simplify life... (in my opinion anyways)
    HT That's what I ment. Domains are a pain to set up but (if done half ass right) easier to administrate.

    Indeed they do simplify life.

    Edit: Domains are harder to set up initialy than workgroups
    09:F9:11:02:9D:74:E3:5B8:41:56:C5:63:56:88:C0

  3. #13
    The Prancing Pirate
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    How are they easier to administer? Please explain Many thanks,

    J_K9
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  4. #14
    THE Bastard Sys***** dinowuff's Avatar
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    simplified: to administrator a workgroup you (most probably) need to visit each machine on the network.

    on a domain you can administrate all nodes from a central location.

    I could really go on and on. DHCP on workgroups almost always end in ip conflicts. Static IP's are a pain after 15 PC's.

    in a workgroup every user needs to be manually added to everyone else's PC for security/access issues. logon scripts are local.\

    on and on and on
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  5. #15
    The Prancing Pirate
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    Well, the good thing is that there are only about 7 computers in the actual office (it's a small company), so I'm guessing a workgroup would probably be more suited to this environment? Plus, I already know how to set up a workgroup, and the only way to crack the network internally is to be physically inside the office, in other words breaking into the office itself. From the outside, it's the same whether you have a domain or a workgroup, as long as you have a good firewall and other security features on your router. As far as the company's employees go, none of them are even computer savvy enough to be able to use the command-line! lol. Therefore, a workgroup shouldn't be a problem - agreed? Thanks again,

    J_K9
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  6. #16
    THE Bastard Sys***** dinowuff's Avatar
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    7 comupters?

    No Brainer Workgroup
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  7. #17
    The Prancing Pirate
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    Good stuff! Thanks to everyone who posted in this thread! And thank you dino for helping me come to a conclusion

    J_K9
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  8. #18
    The Prancing Pirate
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    Sorry for double-posting...

    &lt;offtopic&gt;

    I was just wondering: I currently have a Linksys WAG54G v1.2, and I'm having a lot of trouble getting SMTP working. IMAP works like a charm, but SMTP has refused to work. Now, if I got the router for the office, how would I go about solving this problem? Many of the employees need to send and check their email on a regular basis, and if SMTP will be a problem, then it just can't be done. I was thinking about port forwarding, but then you can only forward ports to one IP address.

    How can I make it possible for all the clients to use SMTP? Under the "Application and Gaming" tag in my router's settings, there are four subheadings: "Single Port Forwarding, Port Range Forwarding, Port Triggering, DMZ". The port forwarding ones are only able to forward to one address. Could someone please inform me on how to allow the SMTP to work in the network, as it's currently being blocked by the router...

    My workaroud (not sure if this works):
    ADSL line --&gt; Router --&gt; Box 1, running IPCop --&gt; Networked Computers
    Would this work? If it did, all the networked computers would use "Box 1 as their gateway, and Box 1 would be connected to the router, which in turn is connected to the ADSL line. I'm guessing this would be quite good because I would have a hardware and software firewall in place - double protection! Also, the router could forward SMTP to Box 1, and then the networked computers could use Box 1 as their gateway and be able to access SMTP. Would this be too complicated? Is it possible? If it is, would you recommend using IPCop or something else (like Coyote, etc..)? Thanks in advance,

    J_K9

    &lt;/offtopic&gt;
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  9. #19
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    for checking mail the POP protocol is used (Post Office Protocol) SMTP is used for sending mail (Simple mail transfer protocol).

    if users are sending/receiving mail using outside mail servers nothing needs to be mapped.
    Bukhari:V3B48N826 “The Prophet said, ‘Isn’t the witness of a woman equal to half of that of a man?’ The women said, ‘Yes.’ He said, ‘This is because of the deficiency of a woman’s mind.’”

  10. #20
    The Prancing Pirate
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    Originally posted here by Tedob1
    for checking mail the POP protocol is used (Post Office Protocol) SMTP is used for sending mail (Simple mail transfer protocol).
    I know.... Sorry for not making myself clear enough, yes the problem is when I'm tring to send email using SMTP.
    if users are sending/receiving mail using outside mail servers nothing needs to be mapped.
    That's what I always thought, after all aren't incoming connection filtered by consumer grade firewalls (routers), but none of the outgoing ones are? Then why does POP3/IMAP work perfectly and SMTP doesn't? Shouldn't it be the opposite way round? Well, I'd like to be able to fix this problem, no matter what it is.

    I'm going to call Linksys up about my router (whose WLAN now doesn't work), so maybe I should ask them about why the SMTP doesn't work, while I'm there? Thanks again,

    J_K9
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