2 way electrical circuit
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Thread: 2 way electrical circuit

  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    Question 2 way electrical circuit

    I want to fix another switch to the light in the bedroom for my mom so that she can switch off the light from her bed. I need a circuit which will work as follows:

    switch on the wall => switch next to her => light

    ON => ON => OFF
    ON => OFF => ON
    OFF => ON => ON
    OFF => OFF => OFF

    In other words, the light should switch on only if one of them is switched on and not both.
    Any ideas?
    Never trouble another for what you can do for yourself.
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  2. #2
    T3h Ch3F
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    Link

    Greetings: I would either suggest this.......


    http://www.youcansave.com/clap.asp


    Or this.......................


    http://www.eecs.mit.edu/



    Clap On.............Clap off.......................!!!!!


    Just kidding man.





    I would think a remote control lighting system, there are many of them. You could more than likely figure out a less expensive way to install one.


    lINK>>>>>>>>>>>>(EXAMPLE)

    http://www.alectrosystems.com/lighting/remote.htm

    Good Luck.
    Get some good religion from Bad Religion.

  3. #3
    Leftie Linux Lover the_JinX's Avatar
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    I don't know the english word.. it's called a 'hotel schakelaar' in dutch and a 'interrupteur va-et-vient' in french..

    here's how it works..
    http://www.zowerkt.nl/inenomhuis/ele...schakelaar.htm (DUTCH !!)

    I think the image speaks for itself..
    ASCII stupid question, get a stupid ANSI.
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  4. #4
    T3h Ch3F
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    Originally posted here by the_JinX
    I don't know the english word.. it's called a 'hotel schakelaar'

    Jinx as long as you accept that my 'hotel schakelaar' is bigger than yours I am ok with myself.


    Get some good religion from Bad Religion.

  5. #5
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    Or this.......................


    http://www.eecs.mit.edu/
    <sigh>... i wish i could .
    heh, but not in this lifetime.

    the_jinx:
    Thanks. Just what I was looking for. Looks like a little more work than I thought, but I think I can do it.
    Never trouble another for what you can do for yourself.
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  6. #6
    The Doctor Und3ertak3r's Avatar
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    why not the normal 2-way switch?

    basicly a pair of single pole double throw switches

    http://www.diydoctor.org.uk/projects...d_switches.htm

    scroll down to "Two Way Lighting".. there is the basic system..

    Now you could make a control circuit from the basic building blocks.. the pattern here looks XOR

    0 + 0 = 0
    1 + 0 = 1
    0 + 1 = 1
    1 + 1 = 0

    a single exclusive or-gate .. you can use a simple logic pack IC or build it out of transistors.. not that complex..

    but the 2 spdt switches looks more reliable..

    [Edit] JinXey has the original circuit.. I just didnt read the contents of his links untill now....
    "Consumer technology now exceeds the average persons ability to comprehend how to use it..give up hope of them being able to understand how it works." - Me http://www.cybercrypt.co.nr

  7. #7
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    In the US, we use three-way switches to do what you are asking.
    http://home.howstuffworks.com/three-way.htm

  8. #8
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    Okay, here's our points:
    A-, B-, A+, B+, Lightbulb.

    I think this should work... I have this light switch system all over my house.
    Go from A-, to lightbulb, to B+, and run the other wire from B+ to Lightbulb, then B-.

    Blah, that could be wrong, it's getting late, I'm sleepy... your local home depot fokes would without a doubt be able to tell you for sure.
    Hi.

  9. #9
    Now, RFC Compliant! Noia's Avatar
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    what you need is two single-pole-double-throw switched, and then connect them agains each other...let me try to make an ascii diagram. or PM for further details :P

    / ---------------------------- \
    a--------> <------------b
    \ ---------------------------- /

    basicaly, switches A and B are identical, they have one leg where the power comes in, and two states, either 1 or 2, so, it will either send power down path 1 or 2 depending of how the switch is set, this means that both switches A and B can control the light because they simply need to have the same setting (1-&gt;1 or 2-&gt;2), to turn the ligh of, simply flip a switch, and it will become 1-&gt;2 or 2-&gt;1 which will break the circuit.

    This is atleast how we normaly did it.

    EDIT: ASCII art sucked something cronic!! used \x0160 rather than \x0032 to fix it (I hope)

    EDIT2: **** it, pm me if you want circuit diagrams...
    With all the subtlety of an artillery barrage / Follow blindly, for the true path is sketchy at best. .:Bring OS X to x86!:.
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  10. #10
    ********** |ceWriterguy
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    Undies has it right. It's the classic 'staircase' scenario - one switch at the top of the stairs, one at the bottom. Both on == on, both off == on, one off one on == off.

    If I had my old BEE notes I'd post the diagram - it's not too difficult to wire.
    Even a broken watch is correct twice a day.

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