a basic question
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18

Thread: a basic question

  1. #1

    Post a basic question

    i wanna know the basic differences between bus speed ,procesor's speed(32 bit or 64 bit),ram memory(256 512 MB ram) and processor's clock speed(2GHz to 3GHz).what are the differences between them and what there specific task.

    reply ?

    may contact or reply at shaleenpandiya@rediff.com

  2. #2
    T̙͓̞̣̯ͦͭͅͅȂͧͭͧ̏̈͏̖̖Z̿ ͆̎̄
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    3,171
    Where are we going with this shals?

    You made a thread and received several replies...which you must have deleted to start another thread...with the exact same question...copy n' paste, eh?...word for word?

    what exactly was wrong with the last thread...didn't like the answers?

    are you going to delete this thread too?

    I'll repeat what I said in the last thread...why do you want people to reply at that site with the answers when they can just post them?

  3. #3
    Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    1,161
    Hey Egal did anyone refer her to http://www.answers.com/. ? This is a great site.

    But if you need any answers on overclocking etc..... post your BIOS , Board, RAM, CPU (Willamette Northwood etc) in the hardware forum and I'll help you out. But that resource will answer your basic questions.

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    27
    Your processor's clock speed is how fast your processer is.It sorts out all of your info and proccess it. It is messerd by Mhz or Ghz. ill give you an example. 2GHz to 3GHz is a 1000 Mhz increase sow its speed has increased by 1 Ghz.

    Ram standes for (Random Assecible Memory) it is what programs use to run on. The more ram you have the smoother your programs wil run most likley. Ill give you an example. Windows Xp needs 128mb of ram to run properly.Sow if you dident have 128mb of ram Windows Xp might run slowly.

    I dount now any thing about bus speed. I think 32bit and 64bit have some thing to do with how the cpu proccess data.

    I all sow think that the site !mitationRust posted is nice you should look in to that.

    sorry for my bad spelling
    There is all way\'s one way to fix a computer. Our i think sow at least

    www.americasarmy.com

  5. #5
    Banned
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    1,004
    Your processor's clock speed is how fast your processer is.It sorts out all of your info and proccess it. It is messerd by Mhz or Ghz. ill give you an example. 2GHz to 3GHz is a 1000 Mhz increase sow its speed has increased by 1 Ghz.
    Close, but not quite. M/G/T-FLOPS or M/G/T-IPS are measures of a processor's speed.

    "In a computer, clock speed refers to the number of pulses per second generated by an oscillator that sets the tempo for the processor. Clock speed is usually measured in MHz (megahertz, or millions of pulses per second) or GHz (gigahertz, or billions of pulses per second)." - http://whatis.techtarget.com/definit...211799,00.html

    CPUs with more advanced instruction sets (x86 is rather aenemic, not as bad as it has historically been, but still so) can perform more instruction per time, for example.

    (VERY simplified)

    CPU X has the following instructions: +1, -1
    CPU Y has the following instructions: +1, +2,... +10,000, -1, -2, ... -10,000

    CPU X has a clock speed of 10GHz
    CPU Y has a clock speed of 1MHz

    CPU X is 10,000 times faster, right?

    Our program calls for a cycle of addition and then auditing with subtaction (to ensure a zero total)

    10000 + 10000 = 20000
    20000 + 10000 = 30000
    30000 + 10000 = 40000

    40000-(10000+10000+10000+10000) = 0

    CPU X requires 110,000 cycles to perform this task
    CPU Y requires 11 cycles to perform this task

    Since CPU X is 10,000 times faster, the two chips work equally fast, CPU Y however will use much less power and subsequently generate less heat.

    Ram standes for (Random Assecible Memory) it is what programs use to run on. The more ram you have the smoother your programs wil run most likley. Ill give you an example. Windows Xp needs 128mb of ram to run properly.Sow if you dident have 128mb of ram Windows Xp might run slowly.
    This is kinda sorta true, first it is Random Access Memory, and this is because the memory can be accessed asequentially. In reality you really don't need RAM, it just happens to be the crossover point of the cheapest/fastest way to handle subject memory.

    Alternate methods of managing this memory are CPU cache (most CPUs have less than one meg of usable cache however). This is the fastest and most expensive method, which is why CPUs high in cache like Intel's Xeon CPUs work so well for servers that repeat the same tasks over and over. These tasks may be loaded into the cache, saving the system from having to look to the RAM. The other method is paging or as you in Linux land call it, the swap file. This is where data is written to a dedicated partition on the hard drive. This method is very cheap (since you more than likely have a little spare disk space and RAM costs money) and most operating systems require a paging file, just as they require RAM and CPU cache. Gotta be universal.

    I dount now any thing about bus speed
    Bus speed is the speed at which data moves from one element of the system to another (from the CPU to the RAM, from the video card to the CPU, from the hard disc to the CPU, from the PCI card to the CPU, etc). This is measured in bits (how wide the pipe is) and clock speed, defined the same as above.

    I think 32bit and 64bit have some thing to do with how the cpu proccess data.
    Sorta again, this is how wide the processor pipe is.

    if CPU A is a one bit processor and CPU B is a two bit processor, processor B can move data through at twice the speed of CPU A. granted the actual data processing still deals with the CPU clock speed and instruction set, but still moving more data through is always a good thing.

    And now... I'm missing ATHF...

    cheers,

    catch

  6. #6
    Frustrated Mad Scientist
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    1,152
    Try www.pcadvisor.co.uk

    Its more of a general computing forum but very friendly and helpful.
    There are some very knowlegeable chaps and chapesses who will happily answer any computing question you care to pose.
    These sorts of questions would be better suited there rather than in a specific security forum.

  7. #7
    T̙͓̞̣̯ͦͭͅͅȂͧͭͧ̏̈͏̖̖Z̿ ͆̎̄
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    3,171
    Hi Everyone,

    These are the same answers shals received in the last thread...the thread that shals deleted...well, hopefully this one won't get deleted too.

    Eg

  8. #8
    Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    1,161
    Well that was quite the damn answer catch for this early in the morning. And if it had been asked, I'm sure you would've given a lengthy post on a reference validation mechanism (RVM) as well at this hour.

    I'm out


    Egal I saw his/her post in hardware......

  9. #9
    T̙͓̞̣̯ͦͭͅͅȂͧͭͧ̏̈͏̖̖Z̿ ͆̎̄
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    3,171
    Hi Rust,

    Something is definitely not right here...not only did shals do the previously mentioned...his/her thread was moved from here to hardware by, I presume the mods, after shals was told in the first post he/she was in the wrong forum...

    now the hardware thread is gone after about seven replies...and it's re-posted back where it was in the wrong forum.

    Only thing I can think of is shals is trying to site SPAM.

    Eg

  10. #10
    thanks first of all catch

    for giving such a wonderful answer to the questrion especially the e.g you give were ood.good job done keep it up(answer all my question which come in this section)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •