encrypted file system
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: encrypted file system

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    4

    encrypted file system

    hello

    im going to buy a new laptop (acer aspire 1694), i had a big problem with my last laptop, it was stolen and someone got access to all the data in the harddrive!

    i used microsoft windows xp in a fat32 partition, now i want to use both microsot windows xp and slackware linux, i know almost nothing about linux but im going to learn...

    my question is, what option should i take to save and secure all my data/files?

    1- i need to have read and write (or at least read) in both operating systems.

    this means... i can't put all the files in a ntfs drive or ext2, i know there are some third party add-ons that let me work in other file systems, i saw a microsoft windows xp add-on that would let me work in ext2 partitions, but i don't know if i can trust them!

    2- i would like to use encrypted file system so that if someone i don't know gets access to my data/files they can't view them!

    the problem is that i really don't know how encypted file system work! i have no clue! i mean, it would be great it worked like e a normal file system after the user loging in, for example: in microft windows xp or linux "welcome screen" (where people type the username and password) i enter them as i normaly do, and then get access to my harddrive like a normal file system, this means that if someone doesn't login with the rigth username/password they can't view my files!

    this would be great if it worked like this, but i think theres lots more... ca anyone explain me how encrypted file systems work in ntfs ext2?

    3- if i use a encrypted file system i'm almost sure that i won't be able to access and work in files as i said in "1-" (being able to use/work with files encrypted in ntfs or ext2 using both operating systems. i would only be able to work with ntfs files in microsoft windows and ext2 files in linux) maybe i will use a normal fat32 partition to install microsoft windows xp, leaving the files unecrypted and only encrypt the ext2 partition, saving all files (that don't need to be encrypted) in the fat32 this way i could work with them using both operating systems.

    i coul also use a encrypted ntfs partition to install microsoft windows, a encrypted ext2 partition to install linux and then create a fat32 partition to store files that don't need to be encrypted and to have read/write access from both operating systems

    but i don't even know how encrypted file systems work anyway eh eh, i did already search google for it but didn't help, i know that for microsoft windows xp i need the professional version, that's not a problem

    thanks!!!

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    188
    Hi

    I'm not sure about the model of the computer u r buying has got the biometric security or not but if you can squeeze in some extra bucks and get urself the one with it u'll save urself a lot of hassles.

    The problem will be solved as to open the laptop u'll need ur fingerprint or the one of ur trusted person. IBM ThinkPad T42 with Biometric Security is the one that may answer your need. If u can spend some more money for this its worth it !

    Good Luck
    \"The Smilie Wars\" ... just arrived after the great crusades

    .... computers come to the rescue .... ah technology at last has some use.

  3. #3
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    445
    Except that biometric security is not some kind of panacea for security needs. There is very little Linux support for it, and he has already said he is new to Linux.

    In a dual boot system with the requirements you have suggested, why not run Windows on an encrypted NTFS fs, and slackware on an encrypted Reiser file system, with a FAT32 drive in the middle.

    On the FAT32, keep your stuff in an encrypted archive.

    There is no fs compatability that I know of when encryption is involved, also, write support for NTFS is insanely limited and unreliable, as well as the reverse involving Reiser.

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    4
    the problem is that i don't know how to create or work with encrypted file systems

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    1,675
    Could always save your data on USB JumpDrives like a Lexar, and take the bugger with you.

    !~cheers~!
    Connection refused, try again later.

  6. #6
    Super Moderator: GMT Zone nihil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    United Kingdom: Bridlington
    Posts
    17,192
    I suspect Relyt may be heading in the right direction. How much data are you talking about? I would have thought that the 4.7Gig on a R/RW/W DVD would be adequate? or even a CD?

    If they have stolen your machine, they have all the time in the world to crack it..............best if the data are never there in the first place.

    If you cannot do someone any good: don't do them any harm....
    As long as you did this to one of these, the least of my little ones............you did it unto Me.
    What profiteth a man if he gains the entire World at the expense of his immortal soul?

  7. #7
    Banned
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    1,004
    One word and one acronym:

    Momentus FDE (Full Drive Encryption)

    http://www.seagate.com/products/notebook/momentus.html

    Laptop drives using drive level encryption... boot the computer, enter the drive passphrase and load your operating system as normal.

    cheers,

    catch

  8. #8
    Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Yes
    Posts
    4,429
    Didn't you have a thread recently about how Seagate sucks?

  9. #9
    Banned
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    1,004
    I did, I did... and I know... I am hoping that I must just be very unlucky because seriously as far as drives go, they have been the best for so long.

    cheers,

    catch

  10. #10
    Custom User
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    503
    I wouldn't rate fingerprint scanners anyway because of the fact that they are relatively easy to fool. I'm sure there was a tutorial about it not long ago which showed that with a few simple materials you could lift someone's fingerprint from the surface of the scanner and create a false copy of it to then use.

    Another point is that stopping someone from getting access to a machine by not allowing them to log on or whatever is relatively limited since the data is still stored on the machine and can be accessed by removing the drive.

    ac

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

 Security News

     Patches

       Security Trends

         How-To

           Buying Guides