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Thread: In need of armor

  1. #11
    Junior Member
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    May 2005
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    It would not give you any problems but it's not needed (since your mom already has one in place).

    I would say go with a software firewall (again, just to see what is trying to make outbound connections). When your computer got infected, did any other computers on your home network get infected?

    -ts

  2. #12
    Senior Member
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    actually my computer was the last to get problems because i did have the most protection, althought obviously not enough. im not even going to go into the problems my moms computer is having. my older brother is useing my old computer and its only problem is its windows me, and the other comp had some program that kept downloading spyware that i was able to track down and nuke.
    \"He who shall introduce into public affairs the principles of primitive Christianity will change the face of the world.\"
    Benjamin Franklin

  3. #13
    Hoopy Frood
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
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    662
    Here's my personal recommendation:
    Kerio Personal Firewall (free)
    AVG 7.0 Free Edition
    Spybot: Search and Destroy. (Enable both Hosts File Protection, and Immunization.)
    Put this malicious site blocking list in your HOSTS file: http://www.mvps.org/winhelp2002/hosts.htm
    For instructions on finding/editing the HOSTs file, please see my tutorial:
    http://www.antionline.com/showthread...hreadid=266592

    Turn off File and Printer sharing. (Properties of your LAN.)
    If you must use Internet Explorer, configure the Security Settings to prompt you for just about anything ActiveX related. This will eliminate one hole through which Spyware/Adware/Malware can get through.
    I prefer Firefox, however, because if a vulnerability does manage to get exploited on your system through Firefox, because Firefox isn't directly tied into the Windows Kernel (like I.E. is) I believe that it would be harder for the exploit to do an extreme amount of damage to your system easily.


    - X
    "Personality is only ripe when a man has made the truth his own."

    -- Søren Kierkegaard

  4. #14
    AO's Mr Grumpy
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
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    903
    Originally posted here by xierox
    Here's my personal recommendation:
    My point exactly. Personal, what works for you will not suit everybody. My personal set up has been tried and tested by me for over 6 years with no problems, but that is not to say it will suit anybody and be effective
    Computer says no
    (Carol Beer)

  5. #15
    Banned
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    Put a router (hardware firewall)
    MLF *slap* We just discussed this in the other thread about firewalls that you were involved in. Don't you pay attention at all?

    As for pop-up blocker using a properly configured Firefox instead of IE tends to stop pop-ups.
    Both browsers offer this functionality. There is no security advantage to Firefox or any other full featured browser.

    You can (and probably should) run a personal firewall if for nothing else than seeing what on your box is trying to make outgoing connections. ;-)
    netstat offers the same functionality and is included with his system already.

    I did some looking around and am thinking about going with firefox instead of ie, well come on why wouldn't I
    Because you gain nothing and you can't really remove IE so now you have two browsers on your system for no gain.

    I would say go with a software firewall
    What kind of software firewall? All firewalls are software! This advice says nothing more than you think it should be local. Nothing about the functionality provided.

    actually my computer was the last to get problems because i did have the most protection, althought obviously not enough.
    If the trusted network (the network segment on your side of the router) has been compromised, it is not practical to secure any given system on that segment. You need to clean the entire network first.

    Firefox isn't directly tied into the Windows Kernel (like I.E. is)
    No, IE is not "directly tied into the Windows Kernel" it runs in user space just like every other application.

    I believe that it would be harder for the exploit to do an extreme amount of damage to your system easily.
    The amount of damage that can be done is directly related to the amount of access afforded to the offending application and has nothing to do with the application itself. If Firefox and IE are run under the same rights, exploits of each will be capable of the same amount of damage. Applications do not and cannot control their level of access, this can only be done by the OS.

    Knowing this....
    Create a very limited account for yourself, no installation capabilities. Use this account for all your normal functions. Minimize your use of unneeded services. Use your computer's IP filtering system to restrict incoming access to only services you plan on sharing. Use your web browser's security settings to restrict the functionality of untrusted websites and use an on the spot virus scanner like trenmicro's online scan to verify software packages before installing them.

    cheers,

    catch

  6. #16
    Hoopy Frood
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
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    Originally posted here by catch
    No, IE is not "directly tied into the Windows Kernel" it runs in user space just like every other application.

    The amount of damage that can be done is directly related to the amount of access afforded to the offending application and has nothing to do with the application itself. If Firefox and IE are run under the same rights, exploits of each will be capable of the same amount of damage. Applications do not and cannot control their level of access, this can only be done by the OS.
    Learn something new every day. Thanks!

    You must spread your AntiPoints around before giving it to catch again.


    - Xierox
    "Personality is only ripe when a man has made the truth his own."

    -- Søren Kierkegaard

  7. #17
    Banned
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    xierox,

    http://www.antionline.com/showthread...hreadid=270607 section 8.3

    you even gave it greens. :P

    cheers,

    catch

  8. #18
    AOs Resident Troll
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    Nov 2003
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    MLF *slap*
    Ouch

    Your right..

    I usually refer to a hardware firewall as an external..firewall \appliance\device...or what ever that thingy magigy is

    Not something that runs on the computer..per se

    I will get the terminalogy correct...

    Forgive me

    I have learned so much from this site.....and continue to
    How people treat you is their karma- how you react is yours-Wayne Dyer

  9. #19
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    It isn't so much a terminology issue... but "hardware firewall" doesn't tell you what type of firewall it is... just what kind of system it is running on. :P Which, really isn't very informative.

    cheers,

    catch

  10. #20
    Hoopy Frood
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
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    662
    8.3q. Between application X and Y, which is more secure?
    8.3a. Since applications are not capable of enforcing the level and type of system resources they can access the idea of relying on applications for security is a foolish one.
    That said, you want to seek applications that require minimal access to system resources, this ensures that it can be locked up in the smallest compartment by the operating system, which is ultimately responsible for all system security functionality.
    Yes. And I believed that Internet Explorer required more access to system resources than Firefox did.

    - Xierox
    "Personality is only ripe when a man has made the truth his own."

    -- Søren Kierkegaard

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