Little bit of Liux help over here please!
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18

Thread: Little bit of Liux help over here please!

  1. #1
    Right turn Clyde Nokia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Button Moon
    Posts
    1,696

    Question Little bit of Liux help over here please!

    Hi all,

    Could anybody answer these questions for me? My little brother is applying for a job and has been told by the recruiter that they may ask questions such as these in the interview, I dont have much exp with Linux and want to make sure he gives a good answer!

    What do level 2/3 file systems mean/do on a LINUX system?
    What advantage(s) if any does a UNIX system have over LINUX one?

    Thanks for you help guys/gals!
    Drugs have taught an entire generation of kids the metric system.

    http://tazforum.**********.com/

  2. #2
    ********** |ceWriterguy
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    1,608
    can answer 2nd, but not first -

    Unix has zero advantage over Linux. Linux is every bit as powerful. Linux is supported by its vendors, and the glory of open-source means issues are in fact fixed more quickly than those of Unix. The only thing Unix has going for it is that it's an older operating system, ergo there's more documentation out there, but that's rapidly going away...

    [edit]Before giving this answer, I strongly suggest your brother do some 'dirty work' and find out what O/S his potential employer uses. If he's good at thinking on his feet, he can slant his answer either way to fit his *employer's choice* which will score him points in getting hired...unless the employer wants to change...[/edit]
    Even a broken watch is correct twice a day.

    Which coder said that nobody could outcode Microsoft in their own OS? Write a bit and make a fortune!

  3. #3
    Right turn Clyde Nokia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Button Moon
    Posts
    1,696
    Thanks |3lack|ce I figured that was a kind of a trick question!

    Thanks for your help!


    // Funny you should say that, I taking him through researching the company as we speak, might make him do some "dumpster diving" later!
    Drugs have taught an entire generation of kids the metric system.

    http://tazforum.**********.com/

  4. #4
    ********** |ceWriterguy
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    1,608
    np - might pm gore about question one, or other linux gurus around here...
    Even a broken watch is correct twice a day.

    Which coder said that nobody could outcode Microsoft in their own OS? Write a bit and make a fortune!

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    3,914
    Hey Hey,

    There could be a few possible answers to your first question (depending on the context of it)..

    The first is in reference to ISO 9660 (CD File Systems) which has three levels..

    Level 1: 8 Characters + 3 Character Extension (Think DOS)
    Level 2: 31 Characters Max
    Level 3: Allows fragmentation (Multiple writes, incremental recording)

    With the word level in there that would make the most sense, however when I see 2/3 and Linux I usually think of ext2 vs ext3... in which case they are the same filesystem, except that ext3 provides journaling, which means it writes a log of fs changes before actually making the changes.

    Peace,
    HT
    IT Blog: .:Computer Defense:.
    PnCHd (Pronounced Pinched): Acronym - Point 'n Click Hacked. As in: "That website was pinched" or "The skiddie pinched my computer because I forgot to patch".

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    394
    level 2/3 file systems. har har.

    i could be showing my ignorance here but i'm guessing the recruiter doesn't know his ass from his mouth.

    perhaps he means ext2 and ext3 filesystems.

    but more likely, i'm guessing he's refering to RAID levels.
    Hmm...theres something a little peculiar here. Oh i see what it is! the sentence is talking about itself! do you see that? what do you mean? sentences can\'t talk! No, but they REFER to things, and this one refers directly-unambigeously-unmistakably-to the very sentence which it is!

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    3,914
    Originally posted here by (V)/\><
    level 2/3 file systems. har har.

    i could be showing my ignorance here but i'm guessing the recruiter doesn't know his ass from his mouth.

    perhaps he means ext2 and ext3 filesystems.

    but more likely, i'm guessing he's refering to RAID levels.

    RAID??? How often do you hear people using RAID Levels 2 and 3? Because I never have.
    IT Blog: .:Computer Defense:.
    PnCHd (Pronounced Pinched): Acronym - Point 'n Click Hacked. As in: "That website was pinched" or "The skiddie pinched my computer because I forgot to patch".

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    394
    just because _YOU_ don't hear about them doesn't mean they don't exist.

    they do.

    however, they are seldom used.
    Hmm...theres something a little peculiar here. Oh i see what it is! the sentence is talking about itself! do you see that? what do you mean? sentences can\'t talk! No, but they REFER to things, and this one refers directly-unambigeously-unmistakably-to the very sentence which it is!

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    3,914
    Originally posted here by (V)/\><
    just because _YOU_ don't hear about them doesn't mean they don't exist.

    they do.

    however, they are seldom used.
    I never said they don't exist... I said I never hear people talking about them.. (Read: They aren't used)...
    IT Blog: .:Computer Defense:.
    PnCHd (Pronounced Pinched): Acronym - Point 'n Click Hacked. As in: "That website was pinched" or "The skiddie pinched my computer because I forgot to patch".

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    1,675
    What do level 2/3 file systems mean/do on a LINUX system?
    Well they might also be talking about our neighborhood Runlevels. Frequently we want to operate services at different runlevels. Might sound a little confusing, but think multi-user systems. What if you had some corruption you wanted to address and of course you didn't want any other users to be on the system or service during that time? Assigning "Runlevel 1" to that particular service/system etc., would be called for. Here's the general definitions of the various runlevels:

    0 - Halt
    1 - Single-user mode
    2 - Not used (can be user specified)
    3 - Full multi-user mode (almost always the default on many distros)
    4 - Not used ( can be user specified)
    5 - Full multi-user mode (with an X-based logon)
    6 - Reboot

    We generally use 2 & 4 for our personal configs and jump back to 3 or 5.

    Definitely have him stroll through them for familiarity, and how to change the runlevels.

    cheers
    Connection refused, try again later.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •