Transfer rate and Protocols
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Thread: Transfer rate and Protocols

  1. #1
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    Transfer rate and Protocols

    What protocol is fast in LAN?
    Does network protocol speed depends on what architecture it have?

    Is it some not usual protocols (not TCP/IP or not depends on TCP/IP) can be used to connect to internet or to router and then to internet?
    // too far away outside of limit

  2. #2
    AOs Resident Troll
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    I guess it depends if your router supports other protocols?

    MLF
    How people treat you is their karma- how you react is yours-Wayne Dyer

  3. #3
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    Originally posted here by morganlefay
    I guess it depends if your router supports other protocols?

    MLF
    yes I know, but does them exist?
    // too far away outside of limit

  4. #4
    Shrekkie Reloaded Raiden's Avatar
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    The internet is tcp/ip based, so that would keep your exotic protocols "indoors". Unless you have a cisco router or sumtin alike, one that supports IPX/SPX, IS-IS, Appletalk or other, and you need to learn other protocols and play with, i would stick to tcp/ip. Actually mostly the speed of your lan depends on the hardware and settings you got and which bottelenecks you create.

    A few good tips to speed up a lan :

    - Check all nics, on your boxes and switches, for speed and set them on 100Mb/s Full Duplex (or higher if possible).
    - Also it makes a big difference if you e.g. ftp data to a server with a harddisk with 5400 rpm or a server with a scsi-controlled harddrive (which sits around 10000 rpm if i'm not mistaken).
    I don't believe you would even be able to use up a whole 100Mb/s with a non-scsi drive.
    - A switch is always better than a hub since a switch makes port-2-port channels during a session.
    If you have big lan's it might be better to segment it in several networks with a layer 3 node ( e.g. a router ) which reduces broadcast-traffic, etc etc ...

    Hope this helps

    This might be a good place to start :

    http://www.infosyssec.net/infosyssec/netprot1.htm

  5. #5
    In And Above Man Black Cluster's Avatar
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    Or if the protocol you are about to use is actually routable! not all protocols are routable!

    If you are talking about connecting to the internet through router, you need to use a routable protocol! Like it has to have a Route Discovery Protocol!
    TCP/IP uses both, Open Shortest Path First {OSPF} and Routing Information Protocol {RIP}!

    You must know that also routers have a say about the speed of your network! Let me explain briefly!
    Every router has a routing table! How the information gets to that routing table actually plays a key role in the speed! and they are:

    1- Static Routing: here admins update the routing table, this is no more used anymore!
    2- Dynamic routing: This is use two categories of route discovering protocols, and they are Distance Vector and Link Stat!
    Distance Vector Broadcasts packets {the whole routing table} to other router like {IRP} every 30 seconds!
    While Link state which uses multicasting, which send only the updates to other routers! Here Link state is by far more efficient!

    TCP/IP uses both connection types, TCP for connection-oriented which requires reliable end-to-end flow and error control! and UDP for connectionless which trade reliability for speed!

    We have IPX/SPX and XNS too! But TCP/IP the dominating! and is the protocol of choice!
    Why do you want to shift from TCP/IP, it provides with the most powerful set of protocols!
    After all I don't think you need to change to another protocol, TCP/IP is th best!

    I hope I helped a bit!

    Cheers
    \"The only truly secure system is one that is powered off, cast in a block of concrete and sealed in a lead-lined room with armed guards - and even then I have my doubts\".....Spaf
    Everytime I learn a new thing, I discover how ignorant I am.- ... Black Cluster

  6. #6
    Shrekkie Reloaded Raiden's Avatar
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    1- Static Routing: here admins update the routing table, this is no more used anymore!
    I wouldn't underestimate the use of static routing. It is still very commonly used, as its fast and easy if you only have a few networks to route, whereas a link state protocol like OSPF can be a heavy load on your router. IMO OSPF is very good, very dynamic and very solid but in not much of use if you only have to route a few known networks.

    Cheers

  7. #7
    In And Above Man Black Cluster's Avatar
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    It was used in the past and no longer used these days, unless we have some admins who want to waste time and effort updating and selecting ports ...

    I forgot to mention that OSPT is for TCP/IP and NetWork Link Services Protocol {NLSP} is for IPX/SPX.
    \"The only truly secure system is one that is powered off, cast in a block of concrete and sealed in a lead-lined room with armed guards - and even then I have my doubts\".....Spaf
    Everytime I learn a new thing, I discover how ignorant I am.- ... Black Cluster

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