EU approves two-year data retention policy
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Thread: EU approves two-year data retention policy

  1. #1
    In And Above Man Black Cluster's Avatar
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    Feb 2005
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    912

    EU approves two-year data retention policy

    Yes, EU has officially intorduced this new challenge to EU-based companies: this is related to older thread

    http://www.antionline.com/showthread...hreadid=272234

    Telecommunications companies and Internet service providers face a massive increase in data storage requirements after European Union lawmakers voted yesterday to require companies to keep data for up to two years.

    Members of the European Parliament (MEP), the EU's directly elected assembly, voted overwhelmingly for new rules on data retention that require companies to keep traffic and location information for a minimum of six months and a maximum of two years. Some countries will be allowed to require that data be kept longer. The content of calls will not have to be stored.

    Law-enforcement authorities in the country where data is collected will have an automatic right to access it. Such authorities in countries outside of the European Union will have access if data-sharing agreements exist with the country in question.

    The vote in the Parliament follows an identical decision by representatives of the EU's 25 member governments in the Council of Ministers at the start of December. The common position of the two decision-making bodies means that the new rules will take effect in about 18 months for telephone data. The new rules for Internet data will come into force three years from now.

    The U.K. government, which is currently chairing EU meetings, made getting an agreement on the rules a priority after the London transportation bombings in July. Police and intelligence services used mobile phone records and closed-circuit TV footage to identify and track down suspected perpetrators of the attacks that killed 55 people.

    U.K. Home Secretary Charles Clarke said the agreement sends a "powerful message that Europe is united against terrorism and organized crime."

    However, the new rules have come under fire from civil liberties campaigners. The new requirements are a "green light for mass surveillance, fishing expeditions and profiling," said U.K. Liberal Democrat MEP Sarah Ludford.

    "Real terrorists escape detection by using foreign Internet service providers like Hotmail and Yahoo, Internet cafes, and pay-as-you-go phones while ordinary citizens could find details of their movement, acquaintances and favorite Web sites circulating [among government officials]," she added.

    She also warned that customers may see phone call prices rise as telecom companies and ISPs pass on the cost of storing data and making it available to law enforcement authorities. Ludford has been fighting to limit the period for storing data to a maximum of 12 months.

    Under the agreement, data would have to be retained for "investigation, detection and prosecution of serious crime." Data on calls that are placed, but not answered has to be retained only if the telecommunications company already stores such data. Reimbursement of costs to telcos and ISPs will be up to each member state and the rules will be reviewed three years after they come into force.
    Source
    \"The only truly secure system is one that is powered off, cast in a block of concrete and sealed in a lead-lined room with armed guards - and even then I have my doubts\".....Spaf
    Everytime I learn a new thing, I discover how ignorant I am.- ... Black Cluster

  2. #2
    Kwiep
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    924
    I don't remember exactly, but on the phone thing, location information already is stored for alot of phones (mostly prepaid cellsphones). People with non-prepaid cellphones and people with landlines naturaly have their traffic info saved because they can't be billed without that...

    I read some article a while ago that this thing wouldn't actually help solving more crimes at all. Alot of information is already stored and that information proved to be more then enough in the past.

    Yeah, that's right, I'm basicly just in the dark about what the hell they're approving here and what the consequences are.

    I agree with this from the article:
    "Real terrorists escape detection by using foreign Internet service providers like Hotmail and Yahoo, Internet cafes, and pay-as-you-go phones while ordinary citizens could find details of their movement, acquaintances and favorite Web sites circulating [among government officials]," she added.
    Because, really, if I were a serious terrorist I'd cover my ass for stuff like this.

    And also I have a preemptive (maybe unfounded) deteste for everything wich got anti-terrorism tags on it. They usually are more anti-somthing-else and are just loosely related to something terrorismic then the other way arround. Basicly you can relate everything to terrorism. Maybe the traintickets should be more expensive so low-resource terrorists can't get in the train or maybe you should have a special license for everything electronic that might be used to detonate a bomb. Maybe we should stop voting so high-resource terrorists can't get a seat in the parliament/senate/whatever.
    Double Dutch

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