I'm A Programmer, Not A Computer Guy
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Thread: I'm A Programmer, Not A Computer Guy

  1. #1
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    I'm A Programmer, Not A Computer Guy

    A gentle warning to young or up-and-coming IT professionals: keep your professional identity a secret! Guard your privacy like a superhero, because before you can say "what do you mean reboot?", you'll be the neighborhood troubleshooter, constantly on call to save the day.
    "Did you watch the Raiders game?"

    "No, I don't follow football ------"

    "What do you think of the new quarterback?"

    "Really, football's not my thing. I don't know."

    "I thought that you said that you're a sports fan?"

    "No, I said that I watched tennis."

    "Right, so what did you think of the penalty called in the Raiders game?"

    "I watch tennis."

    "Why would they call a penalty like that?"

    Um.
    The thing is that most programmers are also complete geeks whose hobbies include messing around with these machines. I'm not one of those, but apparently, I'm easily confused with them. Consequently, I'm what they would call, though I'd never lay claim to the name, an "expert."
    i got a laugh out of this article/blog, give it a read.

    source: http://blogcritics.org/archives/2006/01/13/213613.php

  2. #2
    Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    62

    I'm A Programmer, Not A Computer Guy

    A gentle warning to young or up-and-coming IT professionals: keep your professional identity a secret! Guard your privacy like a superhero, because before you can say "what do you mean reboot?", you'll be the neighborhood troubleshooter, constantly on call to save the day.
    "Did you watch the Raiders game?"

    "No, I don't follow football ------"

    "What do you think of the new quarterback?"

    "Really, football's not my thing. I don't know."

    "I thought that you said that you're a sports fan?"

    "No, I said that I watched tennis."

    "Right, so what did you think of the penalty called in the Raiders game?"

    "I watch tennis."

    "Why would they call a penalty like that?"

    Um.
    The thing is that most programmers are also complete geeks whose hobbies include messing around with these machines. I'm not one of those, but apparently, I'm easily confused with them. Consequently, I'm what they would call, though I'd never lay claim to the name, an "expert."
    i got a laugh out of this article/blog, give it a read.

    source: http://blogcritics.org/archives/2006/01/13/213613.php

  3. #3
    you're right... it's funny...

  4. #4
    you're right... it's funny...

  5. #5
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    Hey Hey,

    The sad part is that, from my experience, it's true.... 95% of the time programmers know **** about an actual computer.... I tend to think that's why we have so many vulnerabilities and exploits available. How can you properly code software to run on something you don't actually understand... even if you don't fully understand it.... a partial understanding would be acceptable..

    It was a running joke when I was studying/working at the college... I had three primary focuses in my actual work position... IT Students, Residence Students and Online Students... IT Students... we'd see 15-20 programmers with PC problems to everyone one technology student... As far as school went, we could be sure that when we came in after them (if we both used the same lab that day) that some of the network jacks would be broken, the place would be a mess, etc, etc, etc...

    And so I developped my dislike for most programmers ... Although I considered taking the course.. but only because I felt I did it the right way... get a solid understanding of the PC and then program...

    I don't think going straight into programming is a great idea... not in the least.

    Although it was a fun read

    Peace,
    HT
    IT Blog: .:Computer Defense:.
    PnCHd (Pronounced Pinched): Acronym - Point 'n Click Hacked. As in: "That website was pinched" or "The skiddie pinched my computer because I forgot to patch".

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    Hey Hey,

    The sad part is that, from my experience, it's true.... 95% of the time programmers know **** about an actual computer.... I tend to think that's why we have so many vulnerabilities and exploits available. How can you properly code software to run on something you don't actually understand... even if you don't fully understand it.... a partial understanding would be acceptable..

    It was a running joke when I was studying/working at the college... I had three primary focuses in my actual work position... IT Students, Residence Students and Online Students... IT Students... we'd see 15-20 programmers with PC problems to everyone one technology student... As far as school went, we could be sure that when we came in after them (if we both used the same lab that day) that some of the network jacks would be broken, the place would be a mess, etc, etc, etc...

    And so I developped my dislike for most programmers ... Although I considered taking the course.. but only because I felt I did it the right way... get a solid understanding of the PC and then program...

    I don't think going straight into programming is a great idea... not in the least.

    Although it was a fun read

    Peace,
    HT
    IT Blog: .:Computer Defense:.
    PnCHd (Pronounced Pinched): Acronym - Point 'n Click Hacked. As in: "That website was pinched" or "The skiddie pinched my computer because I forgot to patch".

  7. #7
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    Nothing like a healthy heap of stereotyping to make one's day.

    I did know of a programmer once who had no clue how to move his windows taskbar off the side of his screen. Bright guy, just never needed to know how.

    All that being said, IME it's not typical, though the reverse is -- ie: networking students being incapable of even basic scripting/HTML, but excellent knowledge of OS workings and various networking related technologies.
    Chris Shepherd
    The Nelson-Shepherd cutoff: The point at which you realise someone is an idiot while trying to help them.
    \"Well as far as the spelling, I speak fluently both your native languages. Do you even can try spell mine ?\" -- Failed Insult
    Is your whole family retarded, or did they just catch it from you?

  8. #8
    Senior Member
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    Nothing like a healthy heap of stereotyping to make one's day.

    I did know of a programmer once who had no clue how to move his windows taskbar off the side of his screen. Bright guy, just never needed to know how.

    All that being said, IME it's not typical, though the reverse is -- ie: networking students being incapable of even basic scripting/HTML, but excellent knowledge of OS workings and various networking related technologies.
    Chris Shepherd
    The Nelson-Shepherd cutoff: The point at which you realise someone is an idiot while trying to help them.
    \"Well as far as the spelling, I speak fluently both your native languages. Do you even can try spell mine ?\" -- Failed Insult
    Is your whole family retarded, or did they just catch it from you?

  9. #9
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    Hey Hey,

    I think both are typical.. but it comes down to You don't have to know how to program to deploy a network or setup an OS... it may make it easier.. but it's not needed.. where as you should know an OS in order to program for it..

    As for networking students not being able to program... most of the guys I went to school with couldn't... Our 1st sem. VB class caused the highest dropout rate of all 6 semesters... had the highest failure rate as well.. and it was a very simple class..

    Peace,
    HT
    IT Blog: .:Computer Defense:.
    PnCHd (Pronounced Pinched): Acronym - Point 'n Click Hacked. As in: "That website was pinched" or "The skiddie pinched my computer because I forgot to patch".

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    3,914
    Hey Hey,

    I think both are typical.. but it comes down to You don't have to know how to program to deploy a network or setup an OS... it may make it easier.. but it's not needed.. where as you should know an OS in order to program for it..

    As for networking students not being able to program... most of the guys I went to school with couldn't... Our 1st sem. VB class caused the highest dropout rate of all 6 semesters... had the highest failure rate as well.. and it was a very simple class..

    Peace,
    HT
    IT Blog: .:Computer Defense:.
    PnCHd (Pronounced Pinched): Acronym - Point 'n Click Hacked. As in: "That website was pinched" or "The skiddie pinched my computer because I forgot to patch".

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