ip address?
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Thread: ip address?

  1. #1
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    ip address?

    hi there and ty for a quick response as usual

    i am connected to nett trough netcomm router.
    when i do ipconfig i get my ip address as 192.xxx.x.x.
    question is:
    what is my "proper "ip adress.
    when i visit some sites it says my ip address is 220.345.xxx .x
    Why is that?
    How i find it?
    i used to have static ip address but from your advise in past i changed it to dynamic.
    thanks
    sorry i just realized maybe this is not hardware question but my router is responsible for this so it is somhow related.

  2. #2
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    Hey Hey,

    Log into a router and look for your Status page... It'll display your current IP Address... not sure exactly where that is in a netcomm router... or just check out http://www.whatismyipaddress.com/ It'll display it for you.

    Peace,
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  3. #3
    Just Another Geek
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    Re: ip address?

    Originally posted here by unvi$ible
    hi there and ty for a quick response as usual

    i am connected to nett trough netcomm router.
    when i do ipconfig i get my ip address as 192.xxx.x.x.
    Its probably an 192.168.0.0/16 address. These addresses are defined in RFC-1918 and are so called "private" IP ranges.

    question is:
    what is my "proper "ip adress.
    when i visit some sites it says my ip address is 220.345.xxx .x
    That is your "proper" Internet address.
    Why is that?
    Your router is using Network Address Translation (NAT). It "translates" all traffic going to the Internet to your "proper" Internet address.
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  4. #4
    Right turn Clyde Nokia's Avatar
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    In easy terms, your ISP assigns you one IP addy, as you only have one internet connection. So your routers WAN port will hold this.

    Behind the router on your network you could have any ammount of computers on it, all needing internet access. Say you had 50, it would be very unpractical to assign all 50 computers an external IP addess (one from your isp) so they all get an internal IP (192.168.x.x) for use purley and exclusivley on your network, however when they transmit data outside of your network, obviously the traffic has to go through your WAN port on your router.

    The WAN port already has the IP addy assigned to it by your ISP so it attached this to the data packet and you now have a external, routable IP addy!

    In a nutshell NAT!

    To find your external IP log onto your router and look for the WAN IP Address on your status page.

    Hope it made sense to you!
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  5. #5
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    thanks all.
    clear as bell now.

    ok.now another question came to my mind.
    as my router broadast my ip external ip address which is there to be seen by everone, what is happening when somone port scan me?
    as they assigned range of ip addresses that mean that they can see mine external address.
    Say that i have some open ports which are of some interest for them.
    what happenes next if they try to conect to my pc?
    How my router react?
    As router is regarded as hardware firewall what is happening "behind scene"??

    i have noticed when i use to connect with my internal modem and at same time had zone alarm i had a lot of messages saying somone is trying to accesss bla bla (was set up for high threts)
    Since conecting with router that has come to zero.
    ?



  6. #6
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    If your ip gets port scanned they will scan your ip for open ports. If your behind a router when they port scan you they will be scanning your router for used/open ports. Most of the time they wont find many (port 80 maybe a few others). Lets say you have port 21 open so you can let people use your ftp. If someone scans that they will notice that 21 is open and that there is say vsftpd listening for connections.

    If its a NATed router then they cant connect into the router as theres no physical connection to the net, if its firewalled then the packets will most likly get droped. Its not if they connect to your machine its more about how. Noramaly theres no real way for them to connect to a machine behind a router unless theres been access given to that computer via the router. The routers more or less a door man kinda, thats the best i can do.

    if anyone wants to correct me or add to that, then by all means.
    meh. -ech0.

  7. #7
    Right turn Clyde Nokia's Avatar
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    It is possible using some tunneling techniques to connect to a box behind the router and ive done it with netcat occasionaly and I know a few people who use Nmap to scan "through" routers, however as a rule you are pretty safe with a set-up like this, especially if its just at home.
    Not many people would bother with a 1 or 2 host home network that is behing a NAT'd router unless there was some specific reason. IMHO anyway!

    If its a NATed router then they cant connect into the router as theres no physical connection to the net
    - that isnt strictly true, there has to be a physical connection to the net, how would you be scanning the router otherwise??- ,im prolly misinterpreting what you mean tho!
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