Who knows?
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Thread: Who knows?

  1. #1
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    Who knows?

    This is not a security issue but definitly an issue for my work. Something has happened in the last 6 months to change a system file or folder that does not allow another user on the network to log onto a different workstation and access their mail or our database program (they still have access to the server hard drives just not email or our db program for shipping and receiving). In the local drive our office file / docs.config file we have tried to delete and replace it with a fresh folder but get an error that this file is bad or currupt (why could we not delete and replace this file? Is there a way to get rid and install a fresh folder?). I am able to go on any desktop and access our database, server hard drives and email along with all the other users in this network except one user (which unfortunitly is the one that travels between two offices so when he is at our other office cannot use or db or email If anyone has some insight as to what could cause this or how to troubleshoot a problem like this please comment.

    Thanks.
    JRUMJ

  2. #2
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    Try minor siesmic adjustments to the cpu

    seriously though that does sound quite odd and i have no idea about any of that so im gonna stick with my smart ass reply and let other people give you the help you need.
    \"He who shall introduce into public affairs the principles of primitive Christianity will change the face of the world.\"
    Benjamin Franklin

  3. #3
    Super Moderator: GMT Zone nihil's Avatar
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    Hi,

    The first thing I would do is try to determine if it is the user profile/permissions, or if it is the remote connection.

    1. Can the user log on locally?
    2. Create a new user (test one) with the same attributes as the one with the problem, and see if someone at the other office can use it.
    3. Does your DB have "repair" and "compact" utilities............if it does then run them and defragment the drive.
    4. How full is the drive that the DB is resident on?

    There's a start for you
    If you cannot do someone any good: don't do them any harm....
    As long as you did this to one of these, the least of my little ones............you did it unto Me.
    What profiteth a man if he gains the entire World at the expense of his immortal soul?

  4. #4
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    OK, so I overclocked my CPU to 6 G and blew it through the side of my case and hit a co-worker in the eye with a pencil.

    He still cannot login and access his mail on a different desktop.

    Thanks for the advise though.. My bos is sending your the medical bill. LOL, kidding dude, I didn't touch my CPU setting.
    Thanks,
    jrumj

  5. #5
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    OK, you weren't clear what OS and network you are using, but I suspect it is Windows and a Windows Domain? If so, the laptop user may have corrupted the locally stored profile on the laptop. Then, when it showed up connected to the domain again, that corruption got synchronized with the domain controller that stores all that stuff.

    Log the person off of all locations. Back up the profile folder located on the server, then remove it. Use AD to edit the user account. Go to the part where you set up the home folder path and the profile path. You can have AD reset these by just deleting the last character or two in each path and retype them. Then click Apply. Not just OK. Then click OK. AD will recreate the home and profile folders for the user on the next login. First, you will have to remove the offender from the laptop, though. This could get tricky and you will probably have to go to the command line and brute force the removal.

    Before you do that, though, run a rootkit check and other malware scans on the system. There may be a connection.

  6. #6
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    Originally posted here by nihil
    Hi,

    The first thing I would do is try to determine if it is the user profile/permissions, or if it is the remote connection.

    1. Can the user log on locally?
    2. Create a new user (test one) with the same attributes as the one with the problem, and see if someone at the other office can use it.
    3. Does your DB have "repair" and "compact" utilities............if it does then run them and defragment the drive.
    4. How full is the drive that the DB is resident on?

    There's a start for you
    Thanks nihil!

    The user has not have problems logging on locally here or in our other office. He can access the company drives from any desktop with his login name and password. However he is not able to move to check his mail or access the server with our database on it, while using any other desktop other than his own.
    We actually just bought a new server and new DB software but are still currently running on the old one (in transit) and I do not believe it has any type of repair.
    As far as defrag, why would this be? There is only one user (the newest user) at this small company that has the problem.
    The capacity of the drive and used percentage I am not sure of I will check.
    I think I need to try and create a new user and see if the same problem still exists.
    Thanks,
    jrumj

  7. #7
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    Originally posted here by rapier57
    OK, you weren't clear what OS and network you are using, but I suspect it is Windows and a Windows Domain? If so, the laptop user may have corrupted the locally stored profile on the laptop. Then, when it showed up connected to the domain again, that corruption got synchronized with the domain controller that stores all that stuff.

    Log the person off of all locations. Back up the profile folder located on the server, then remove it. Use AD to edit the user account. Go to the part where you set up the home folder path and the profile path. You can have AD reset these by just deleting the last character or two in each path and retype them. Then click Apply. Not just OK. Then click OK. AD will recreate the home and profile folders for the user on the next login. First, you will have to remove the offender from the laptop, though. This could get tricky and you will probably have to go to the command line and brute force the removal.

    Before you do that, though, run a rootkit check and other malware scans on the system. There may be a connection.
    Will this make a difference if this user is not on a laptop? I don't think it would make a difference. Yes, these are windows machines running 2003 biz. server and xp on all desktops.

    What do you mean remove the offender? What offender? what is a rootkit?

    Thanks

  8. #8
    Super Moderator: GMT Zone nihil's Avatar
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    What is the database management software?

    Yes I would certainly try a new user.

    I have seen software that would limit a user to using his profile on a particular workstation. Do you have anything like that?

    If you cannot do someone any good: don't do them any harm....
    As long as you did this to one of these, the least of my little ones............you did it unto Me.
    What profiteth a man if he gains the entire World at the expense of his immortal soul?

  9. #9
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    Originally posted here by nihil
    What is the database management software?

    Yes I would certainly try a new user.

    I have seen software that would limit a user to using his profile on a particular workstation. Do you have anything like that?

    No, it's pretty strange. I haven't got too in depth with it yet but this is the only user in the company that has this problem.

    Shipping and receiving software ( the db software we just upgraded but haven't implemented)
    Thanks,
    jrumj

  10. #10
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    Sorry, by offender I meant the original corrupted folder.

    Check www.sysinternals.org for RootKitRevealer.

    Didn't quite get that the person in question was working at another physical location. That may make this a bit more difficult.

    Retiring the userID and creating a new one may be in order, and be simpler. Just forward the old email address to the new one.

    One other thing: If the person is able to log in to both locations, what is the method? Is it just a local login, not to a domain? Or, are you synchronizing the domain between the physical locations?

    That could contribute to the situation if the synchronization didn't go right.

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