Open SSH
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Thread: Open SSH

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Open SSH

    i'm interested in implementing open SSH into my system to keep my passwords n such safe,my isp recommends them.

    however my OS doesn't seem to be on the list of supported OS's,i'm running xp by the way.

    can you in fact use it with xp?? or are there similar or in fact better programs to use??

    how would i go about setting this type of thing up as i am very new to this kind of thing.

  2. #2
    Dissident 4dm1n brokencrow's Avatar
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    I use a program called Putty on my Windows machines. It allows me SSH access to my linux servers.
    “Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.” — Will Rogers

  3. #3
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    Re: Open SSH

    Originally posted here by AstralVortex
    i'm interested in implementing open SSH into my system to keep my passwords n such safe,my isp recommends them.

    however my OS doesn't seem to be on the list of supported OS's,i'm running xp by the way.

    can you in fact use it with xp?? or are there similar or in fact better programs to use??

    how would i go about setting this type of thing up as i am very new to this kind of thing.
    AV: I'm going to have to ask if you know what SSH is.... because I highly doubt your ISP recommends you implement it... most ISP's frown upon running servers.

    You can run SSH while on Windows... check out cygwin if you're really interested.

    Now for a bit of background.

    SSH is a Secure Shell... Usually to a *nix server or a networking device... however it can run on pretty much anything... The idea is to use it instead of rlogin or telnet, which will send your passwords in plain text. SSH negotiates and uses encryption so that nothing can be viewed or sniffed by a third party... unless of course they perform a MitM attack, but that's a whole nother story....

    So yeah.. what exactly are you looking for?

    Peace,
    HT
    IT Blog: .:Computer Defense:.
    PnCHd (Pronounced Pinched): Acronym - Point 'n Click Hacked. As in: "That website was pinched" or "The skiddie pinched my computer because I forgot to patch".

  4. #4
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    sry it seems i had misunderstood it's use,my isp does feature a bit somewhere on site about OpenSSH but clearly it's not intended for novice ppl like me who are simply using a single user pc,running windows xp.what i would actually like to know is how to begin using anonymous proxy servers.

    i hear that they help stop web sites that u connect to from obtaining information on you.

    is this correct??how do i go about this??

    sry for being confused,i don't know a lot about all this stuff

  5. #5
    Just Another Geek
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    Originally posted here by AstralVortex
    what i would actually like to know is how to begin using anonymous proxy servers.
    Ah.. No need to use SSH, eventhough you can use it to proxy traffic, it'll probably be a bit too 'advanced' for you right now. Google on anonymous proxy and you'll get all the info you need, without the need for ssh. Please note that most, if not all, of these "anonymous" proxies aren't as anonymous as you would like.. Remember that the guy/girl running the proxy can see everything you do. There's simply no hiding on the Internet
    Oliver's Law:
    Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.

  6. #6
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    if your worried about your privacy and being profiled for advertising or anything else threw your surfing habits, the last thing you want to do is use just any proxy.

    by using a proxy you putting a list of everything you do **all in one log file**. do you know the people running the proxy server? if it's a "free" service then why is it free, nothing else is free really. you pay for it in one way or another. maybe your just getting some ads, maybe the logs are searched for active email addresses to use or sell. the proxy might even be run by a "marketing reasearch" firm, a government agency or even a hacker group.

    dont get me wrong their are proxys run by privacy groups but IMO you need to check them out first.

    (just noticed SirDice is saying this)
    Bukhari:V3B48N826 “The Prophet said, ‘Isn’t the witness of a woman equal to half of that of a man?’ The women said, ‘Yes.’ He said, ‘This is because of the deficiency of a woman’s mind.’”

  7. #7
    Master-Jedi-Pimps0r & Moderator thehorse13's Avatar
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    Look up the definition of a proxy server. Proxys were not designed to hide your identity. They are intended to complete a transaction on your behalf while not connecting you directy to the target host. They are part of the management controls used by administrators, not part of a skiddie toolbox.

    Since this is one of my pet peeves, I'm not going to tee off on anyone but I have to say, the temptation is great.

    --TH13
    Our scars have the power to remind us that our past was real. -- Hannibal Lecter.
    Talent is God given. Be humble. Fame is man-given. Be grateful. Conceit is self-given. Be careful. -- John Wooden

  8. #8
    The Prancing Pirate
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    Tor is a toolset for a wide range of organizations and people that want to improve their safety and security on the Internet. Using Tor can help you anonymize web browsing and publishing, instant messaging, IRC, SSH, and other applications that use the TCP protocol. Tor also provides a platform on which software developers can build new applications with built-in anonymity, safety, and privacy features.

    Tor aims to defend against traffic analysis, a form of network surveillance that threatens personal anonymity and privacy, confidential business activities and relationships, and state security. Communications are bounced around a distributed network of servers called onion routers, protecting you from websites that build profiles of your interests, local eavesdroppers that read your data or learn what sites you visit, and even the onion routers themselves.
    Tor is probably your best bet. As I said elsewhere, 'free anonymous proxies' are (sometimes) a way of saying - 'here I am, now be the Man in the Middle and log everything I do for use later on'. I'm sure you don't want that

    Cheers,

    -jk
    TAZForum <---- click

  9. #9
    Senior Member
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    Hi,
    But doesn't Tor involve some type of Skype type set up where individual users can run servers on their computers? So, isn't it possible that your traffic is being routed through someone else's box? Please correct me if I'm misunderstanding this.
    For the wages of sin is death, but the free gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.
    (Romans 6:23, WEB)

  10. #10
    What about JAP ? http://anon.inf.tu-dresden.de/index_en.html

    But like they say:

    Attention! The first release of JAP is downloadable free of charge and already protects your privacy against most observers like your ISP, your network operator, or your boss. However, this version does not yet achieve the full security and anonymity that we strive for. It does not protect you against an adversary who has the capability to observe all communication links on the Internet.

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